Alpilles

    Sainte Croix Chapel

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    Maussane-les-Alpilles

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    Church of St Croix The Church of St Croix owes its name to the pieces of the Cross of Christ that it is said to contain. The church was consecrated in 1754 after four years of work. The belfry consists of a square tower topped by an openwork balustrade. A wrought iron campanile crowns the structure. The main altar and panelling date from the 19th century. The church square of Maussane now bears the name of its patron, Joseph Laugier de Monblan (1708-1775). Maussane has three oratories, each dedicated to a saint: The Oratory of St Roch in the village was erected as a tribute to the protection afforded by the saint during the 1720-1721 plague. The Oratory of St Marc was built in 1852 alongside a transhumance route, as St Marc was the patron saint of shepherds. Lastly, the Oratory of St Éloi is situated to the south-east of the village adjacent to the arena. Constructed in the 18th century, the church served as the southern boundary of the village for many years. From the 17th century industrial development gave significant impetus to farming in Maussane, with olive production becoming the region’s specialty. The village had up to seven oil mills, the oldest of which – Manville – went back to around the 16th century. There is an annual festival, based on a tradition that probably dates from the late 18th century, in honour of St Éloi (the patron saint of farmers) in Maussane and other villages in the Alpilles. A cart laden with green branches and leaves is drawn by 15 or 20 donkeys or mules as it parades through the village streets accompanied by drums and tambourines. The parish priest blesses the donkeys, mules and horses. The festival is often the opportunity to see the Queen of Arles make an appearance. Secular olive cultivation in Maussane gave the village the reputation of being an olive-growing area. Whilst there were several mills in operation until the close of the 19th century, only two are still active: the mill at Mas des Barres, situated outside the village on the road to Les Calans, and the Jean-Marie Cornille mill in the heart of the village. Numerous mas in the countryside around Maussane sell locally-produced products, such as the Confiserie Raymond Gonfond [72] at Mas Saint-Roman or the beekeeper Blochet [73] in the district of Les Jardins-Neufs. The Maussane wash-house was designed by the architect Louis Astruc. His was an innovative concept that was enthusiastically received by the washerwomen as it made it possible for them to wash clothes without having to bend down. The market is held every Thursday morning on the Place Henri Giraud under the plane trees close to the bowling area where the villagers play pétanque. Church of St Croix The Church of St Croix owes its name to the pieces of the Cross of Christ that it is said to contain. The church was consecrated in 1754 after four years of work. The belfry consists of a square tower topped by an openwork balustrade. A wrought iron campanile crowns the structure. The main altar and panelling date from the 19th century. The church square of Maussane now bears the name of its patron, Joseph Laugier de Monblan (1708-1775). Maussane has three oratories, each dedicated to a saint: The Oratory of St Roch in the village was erected as a tribute to the protection afforded by the saint during the 1720-1721 plague. The Oratory of St Marc was built in 1852 alongside a transhumance route, as St Marc was the patron saint of shepherds. Lastly, the Oratory of St Éloi is situated to the south-east of the village adjacent to the arena. Constructed in the 18th century, the church served as the southern boundary of the village for many years. From the 17th century industrial development gave significant impetus to farming in Maussane, with olive production becoming the region’s specialty. The village had up to seven oil mills, the oldest of which – Manville – went back to around the 16th century. There is an annual festival, based on a tradition that probably dates from the late 18th century, in honour of St Éloi (the patron saint of farmers) in Maussane and other villages in the Alpilles. A cart laden with green branches and leaves is drawn by 15 or 20 donkeys or mules as it parades through the village streets accompanied by drums and tambourines. The parish priest blesses the donkeys, mules and horses. The festival is often the opportunity to see the Queen of Arles make an appearance. Secular olive cultivation in Maussane gave the village the reputation of being an olive-growing area. Whilst there were several mills in operation until the close of the 19th century, only two are still active: the mill at Mas des Barres, situated outside the village on the road to Les Calans, and the Jean-Marie Cornille mill in the heart of the village. Numerous mas in the countryside around Maussane sell locally-produced products, such as the Confiserie Raymond Gonfond [72] at Mas Saint-Roman or the beekeeper Blochet [73] in the district of Les Jardins-Neufs. The Maussane wash-house was designed by the architect Louis Astruc. His was an innovative concept that was enthusiastically received by the washerwomen as it made it possible for them to wash clothes without having to bend down. The market is held every Thursday morning on the Place Henri Giraud under the plane trees close to the bowling area where the villagers play pétanque. Church of St Croix The Church of St Croix owes its name to the pieces of the Cross of Christ that it is said to contain. The church was consecrated in 1754 after four years of work. The belfry consists of a square tower topped by an openwork balustrade. A wrought iron campanile crowns the structure. The main altar and panelling date from the 19th century. The church square of Maussane now bears the name of its patron, Joseph Laugier de Monblan (1708-1775). Maussane has three oratories, each dedicated to a saint: The Oratory of St Roch in the village was erected as a tribute to the protection afforded by the saint during the 1720-1721 plague. The Oratory of St Marc was built in 1852 alongside a transhumance route, as St Marc was the patron saint of shepherds. Lastly, the Oratory of St Éloi is situated to the south-east of the village adjacent to the arena. Constructed in the 18th century, the church served as the southern boundary of the village for many years. From the 17th century industrial development gave significant impetus to farming in Maussane, with olive production becoming the region’s specialty. The village had up to seven oil mills, the oldest of which – Manville – went back to around the 16th century. There is an annual festival, based on a tradition that probably dates from the late 18th century, in honour of St Éloi (the patron saint of farmers) in Maussane and other villages in the Alpilles. A cart laden with green branches and leaves is drawn by 15 or 20 donkeys or mules as it parades through the village streets accompanied by drums and tambourines. The parish priest blesses the donkeys, mules and horses. The festival is often the opportunity to see the Queen of Arles make an appearance. Secular olive cultivation in Maussane gave the village the reputation of being an olive-growing area. Whilst there were several mills in operation until the close of the 19th century, only two are still active: the mill at Mas des Barres, situated outside the village on the road to Les Calans, and the Jean-Marie Cornille mill in the heart of the village. Numerous mas in the countryside around Maussane sell locally-produced products, such as the Confiserie Raymond Gonfond [72] at Mas Saint-Roman or the beekeeper Blochet [73] in the district of Les Jardins-Neufs. The Maussane wash-house was designed by the architect Louis Astruc. His was an innovative concept that was enthusiastically received by the washerwomen as it made it possible for them to wash clothes without having to bend down. The market is held every Thursday morning on the Place Henri Giraud under the plane trees close to the bowling area where the villagers play pétanque. Church of St Croix The Church of St Croix owes its name to the pieces of the Cross of Christ that it is said to contain. The church was consecrated in 1754 after four years of work. The belfry consists of a square tower topped by an openwork balustrade. A wrought iron campanile crowns the structure. The main altar and panelling date from the 19th century. The church square of Maussane now bears the name of its patron, Joseph Laugier de Monblan (1708-1775). Maussane has three oratories, each dedicated to a saint: The Oratory of St Roch in the village was erected as a tribute to the protection afforded by the saint during the 1720-1721 plague. The Oratory of St Marc was built in 1852 alongside a transhumance route, as St Marc was the patron saint of shepherds. Lastly, the Oratory of St Éloi is situated to the south-east of the village adjacent to the arena. Constructed in the 18th century, the church served as the southern boundary of the village for many years. From the 17th century industrial development gave significant impetus to farming in Maussane, with olive production becoming the region’s specialty. The village had up to seven oil mills, the oldest of which – Manville – went back to around the 16th century. There is an annual festival, based on a tradition that probably dates from the late 18th century, in honour of St Éloi (the patron saint of farmers) in Maussane and other villages in the Alpilles. A cart laden with green branches and leaves is drawn by 15 or 20 donkeys or mules as it parades through the village streets accompanied by drums and tambourines. The parish priest blesses the donkeys, mules and horses. The festival is often the opportunity to see the Queen of Arles make an appearance. Secular olive cultivation in Maussane gave the village the reputation of being an olive-growing area. Whilst there were several mills in operation until the close of the 19th century, only two are still active: the mill at Mas des Barres, situated outside the village on the road to Les Calans, and the Jean-Marie Cornille mill in the heart of the village. Numerous mas in the countryside around Maussane sell locally-produced products, such as the Confiserie Raymond Gonfond [72] at Mas Saint-Roman or the beekeeper Blochet [73] in the district of Les Jardins-Neufs. The Maussane wash-house was designed by the architect Louis Astruc. His was an innovative concept that was enthusiastically received by the washerwomen as it made it possible for them to wash clothes without having to bend down. The market is held every Thursday morning on the Place Henri Giraud under the plane trees close to the bowling area where the villagers play pétanque. Church of St Croix The Church of St Croix owes its name to the pieces of the Cross of Christ that it is said to contain. The church was consecrated in 1754 after four years of work. The belfry consists of a square tower topped by an openwork balustrade. A wrought iron campanile crowns the structure. The main altar and panelling date from the 19th century. The church square of Maussane now bears the name of its patron, Joseph Laugier de Monblan (1708-1775). Maussane has three oratories, each dedicated to a saint: The Oratory of St Roch in the village was erected as a tribute to the protection afforded by the saint during the 1720-1721 plague. The Oratory of St Marc was built in 1852 alongside a transhumance route, as St Marc was the patron saint of shepherds. Lastly, the Oratory of St Éloi is situated to the south-east of the village adjacent to the arena. Constructed in the 18th century, the church served as the southern boundary of the village for many years. From the 17th century industrial development gave significant impetus to farming in Maussane, with olive production becoming the region’s specialty. The village had up to seven oil mills, the oldest of which – Manville – went back to around the 16th century. There is an annual festival, based on a tradition that probably dates from the late 18th century, in honour of St Éloi (the patron saint of farmers) in Maussane and other villages in the Alpilles. A cart laden with green branches and leaves is drawn by 15 or 20 donkeys or mules as it parades through the village streets accompanied by drums and tambourines. The parish priest blesses the donkeys, mules and horses. The festival is often the opportunity to see the Queen of Arles make an appearance. Secular olive cultivation in Maussane gave the village the reputation of being an olive-growing area. Whilst there were several mills in operation until the close of the 19th century, only two are still active: the mill at Mas des Barres, situated outside the village on the road to Les Calans, and the Jean-Marie Cornille mill in the heart of the village. Numerous mas in the countryside around Maussane sell locally-produced products, such as the Confiserie Raymond Gonfond [72] at Mas Saint-Roman or the beekeeper Blochet [73] in the district of Les Jardins-Neufs. The Maussane wash-house was designed by the architect Louis Astruc. His was an innovative concept that was enthusiastically received by the washerwomen as it made it possible for them to wash clothes without having to bend down. The market is held every Thursday morning on the Place Henri Giraud under the plane trees close to the bowling area where the villagers play pétanque. Church of St Croix The Church of St Croix owes its name to the pieces of the Cross of Christ that it is said to contain. The church was consecrated in 1754 after four years of work. The belfry consists of a square tower topped by an openwork balustrade. A wrought iron campanile crowns the structure. The main altar and panelling date from the 19th century. The church square of Maussane now bears the name of its patron, Joseph Laugier de Monblan (1708-1775). Maussane has three oratories, each dedicated to a saint: The Oratory of St Roch in the village was erected as a tribute to the protection afforded by the saint during the 1720-1721 plague. The Oratory of St Marc was built in 1852 alongside a transhumance route, as St Marc was the patron saint of shepherds. Lastly, the Oratory of St Éloi is situated to the south-east of the village adjacent to the arena. Constructed in the 18th century, the church served as the southern boundary of the village for many years. From the 17th century industrial development gave significant impetus to farming in Maussane, with olive production becoming the region’s specialty. The village had up to seven oil mills, the oldest of which – Manville – went back to around the 16th century. There is an annual festival, based on a tradition that probably dates from the late 18th century, in honour of St Éloi (the patron saint of farmers) in Maussane and other villages in the Alpilles. A cart laden with green branches and leaves is drawn by 15 or 20 donkeys or mules as it parades through the village streets accompanied by drums and tambourines. The parish priest blesses the donkeys, mules and horses. The festival is often the opportunity to see the Queen of Arles make an appearance. Secular olive cultivation in Maussane gave the village the reputation of being an olive-growing area. Whilst there were several mills in operation until the close of the 19th century, only two are still active: the mill at Mas des Barres, situated outside the village on the road to Les Calans, and the Jean-Marie Cornille mill in the heart of the village. Numerous mas in the countryside around Maussane sell locally-produced products, such as the Confiserie Raymond Gonfond [72] at Mas Saint-Roman or the beekeeper Blochet [73] in the district of Les Jardins-Neufs. The Maussane wash-house was designed by the architect Louis Astruc. His was an innovative concept that was enthusiastically received by the washerwomen as it made it possible for them to wash clothes without having to bend down. The market is held every Thursday morning on the Place Henri Giraud under the plane trees close to the bowling area where the villagers play pétanque. Church of St Croix The Church of St Croix owes its name to the pieces of the Cross of Christ that it is said to contain. The church was consecrated in 1754 after four years of work. The belfry consists of a square tower topped by an openwork balustrade. A wrought iron campanile crowns the structure. The main altar and panelling date from the 19th century. The church square of Maussane now bears the name of its patron, Joseph Laugier de Monblan (1708-1775). Maussane has three oratories, each dedicated to a saint: The Oratory of St Roch in the village was erected as a tribute to the protection afforded by the saint during the 1720-1721 plague. The Oratory of St Marc was built in 1852 alongside a transhumance route, as St Marc was the patron saint of shepherds. Lastly, the Oratory of St Éloi is situated to the south-east of the village adjacent to the arena. Constructed in the 18th century, the church served as the southern boundary of the village for many years. From the 17th century industrial development gave significant impetus to farming in Maussane, with olive production becoming the region’s specialty. The village had up to seven oil mills, the oldest of which – Manville – went back to around the 16th century. There is an annual festival, based on a tradition that probably dates from the late 18th century, in honour of St Éloi (the patron saint of farmers) in Maussane and other villages in the Alpilles. A cart laden with green branches and leaves is drawn by 15 or 20 donkeys or mules as it parades through the village streets accompanied by drums and tambourines. The parish priest blesses the donkeys, mules and horses. The festival is often the opportunity to see the Queen of Arles make an appearance. Secular olive cultivation in Maussane gave the village the reputation of being an olive-growing area. Whilst there were several mills in operation until the close of the 19th century, only two are still active: the mill at Mas des Barres, situated outside the village on the road to Les Calans, and the Jean-Marie Cornille mill in the heart of the village. Numerous mas in the countryside around Maussane sell locally-produced products, such as the Confiserie Raymond Gonfond [72] at Mas Saint-Roman or the beekeeper Blochet [73] in the district of Les Jardins-Neufs. The Maussane wash-house was designed by the architect Louis Astruc. His was an innovative concept that was enthusiastically received by the washerwomen as it made it possible for them to wash clothes without having to bend down. The market is held every Thursday morning on the Place Henri Giraud under the plane trees close to the bowling area where the villagers play pétanque. Church of St Croix The Church of St Croix owes its name to the pieces of the Cross of Christ that it is said to contain. The church was consecrated in 1754 after four years of work. The belfry consists of a square tower topped by an openwork balustrade. A wrought iron campanile crowns the structure. The main altar and panelling date from the 19th century. The church square of Maussane now bears the name of its patron, Joseph Laugier de Monblan (1708-1775). Maussane has three oratories, each dedicated to a saint: The Oratory of St Roch in the village was erected as a tribute to the protection afforded by the saint during the 1720-1721 plague. The Oratory of St Marc was built in 1852 alongside a transhumance route, as St Marc was the patron saint of shepherds. Lastly, the Oratory of St Éloi is situated to the south-east of the village adjacent to the arena. Constructed in the 18th century, the church served as the southern boundary of the village for many years. From the 17th century industrial development gave significant impetus to farming in Maussane, with olive production becoming the region’s specialty. The village had up to seven oil mills, the oldest of which – Manville – went back to around the 16th century. There is an annual festival, based on a tradition that probably dates from the late 18th century, in honour of St Éloi (the patron saint of farmers) in Maussane and other villages in the Alpilles. A cart laden with green branches and leaves is drawn by 15 or 20 donkeys or mules as it parades through the village streets accompanied by drums and tambourines. The parish priest blesses the donkeys, mules and horses. The festival is often the opportunity to see the Queen of Arles make an appearance. Secular olive cultivation in Maussane gave the village the reputation of being an olive-growing area. Whilst there were several mills in operation until the close of the 19th century, only two are still active: the mill at Mas des Barres, situated outside the village on the road to Les Calans, and the Jean-Marie Cornille mill in the heart of the village. Numerous mas in the countryside around Maussane sell locally-produced products, such as the Confiserie Raymond Gonfond [72] at Mas Saint-Roman or the beekeeper Blochet [73] in the district of Les Jardins-Neufs. The Maussane wash-house was designed by the architect Louis Astruc. His was an innovative concept that was enthusiastically received by the washerwomen as it made it possible for them to wash clothes without having to bend down. The market is held every Thursday morning on the Place Henri Giraud under the plane trees close to the bowling area where the villagers play pétanque.


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