Alpilles

    Saint Rémy de Provence village

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    Address

    Town

    Saint-Rémy-de-Provence

    Website

    http://www.saintremy-de-provence.com/

    Map


    Description

    Saint-Rémy de Provence lies at the foot of the Alpilles Massif, in the golden triangle surrounded by the Durance and the Rhône and at the heart of a region of uniquely diverse landscapes, including La Crau, Camargue and Le Comtat. The Alpilles are a small rocky limestone massif, which starts at the Durance; they extend 40 km from East to West and 10 km across. The town is surrounded by extremely diverse The upper, narrower part is devoted to the sanctuary around the sacred source, with small temples dedicated to deities including Valetudo, the goddess of health, and Hercules. The middle zone contains the monumental centre with a Basilica, the Forum, the Curia and some more temples. The upper, narrower part is devoted to the sanctuary around the sacred source, with small temples dedicated to deities including Valetudo, the goddess of health, and Hercules. The middle zone contains the monumental centre with a Basilica, the Forum, the Curia and some more temples.landscapes which have been shaped by human activity since Antiquity. The first tribes settled at the bottom of a valley on the north face of the Alpilles in approximately 600 B.C. There was plentiful water and the forest provided them with game and wood. This wonderful site provided everything required for human settlement. The Greeks planted olive trees and vines in Provence. Stone quarries began to be operated at the foot of the Alpilles in Antiquity. The Romans created an irrigation network around Glanum, part of which is still used. In the Middle Ages, the amount of farmable land available was considerably increased by the drying out of the marshlands to the north of the town and the construction of the Réal Canal. The town of Saint-Rémy grew over the centuries; its main activities were subsistence agriculture and the operation of the quarries. From the 19th century, economic salvation for the region came from trading agricultural industry products. Agricultural specialisation resulted in a landscape characterised by rural life, with no heavy industrialisation or urban development; this is one of the main reasons for the harmonious nature of the Saint Rémy countryside. Today, vines and olive trees are grown to the south, at the foot of the rocky cliffs, the forest and the garrigue of the Alpilles. A rich agricultural plain extends in the other three directions, interspersed with cypress bushes and covered mainly with fruit trees, vegetable crops, fields of cereals and sunflowers. Ewes and horses are also bred there. The water from the canals does not reach the foot of the Alpilles, where most of the vineyards and olive groves are. The vineyards are organic and many vintages are classified as ‘Les Baux de Provence’ AOC. In 1956, a terrible frost killed all the region’s olive groves; some trees grew back from stumps, and many more have been planted over the last few years, resulting in the construction of a new oil mill in Saint Rémy. This land is dominated by the limestone cliffs, aromatic garrigue and forests of Alep pine and green oak which make up the rich natural spaces of the Alpilles. Enjoy an unforgettable view of Saint Rémy, nestled at the foot of the Massif, from the top of the Alpilles. The beauty of these landscapes and the wealth of flora and fauna are the reasons for the protection measures (red zone and biotope protection orders). Saint-Rémy de Provence lies at the foot of the Alpilles Massif, in the golden triangle surrounded by the Durance and the Rhône and at the heart of a region of uniquely diverse landscapes, including La Crau, Camargue and Le Comtat. The Alpilles are a small rocky limestone massif, which starts at the Durance; they extend 40 km from East to West and 10 km across. The town is surrounded by extremely diverse landscapes which have been shaped by human activity since Antiquity. The first tribes settled at the bottom of a valley on the north face of the Alpilles in approximately 600 B.C. There was plentiful water and the forest provided them with game and wood. This wonderful site provided everything required for human settlement. The Greeks planted olive trees and vines in Provence. Stone quarries began to be operated at the foot of the Alpilles in Antiquity. The Romans created an irrigation network around Glanum, part of which is still used. In the Middle Ages, the amount of farmable land available was considerably increased by the drying out of the marshlands to the north of the town and the construction of the Réal Canal. The town of Saint-Rémy grew over the centuries; its main activities were subsistence agriculture and the operation of the quarries. From the 19th century, economic salvation for the region came from trading agricultural industry products. Agricultural specialisation resulted in a landscape characterised by rural life, with no heavy industrialisation or urban development; this is one of the main reasons for the harmonious nature of the Saint Rémy countryside. Today, vines and olive trees are grown to the south, at the foot of the rocky cliffs, the forest and the garrigue of the Alpilles. A rich agricultural plain extends in the other three directions, interspersed with cypress bushes and covered mainly with fruit trees, vegetable crops, fields of cereals and sunflowers. Ewes and horses are also bred there. The water from the canals does not reach the foot of the Alpilles, where most of the vineyards and olive groves are. The vineyards are organic and many vintages are classified as ‘Les Baux de Provence’ AOC. In 1956, a terrible frost killed all the region’s olive groves; some trees grew back from stumps, and many more have been planted over the last few years, resulting in the construction of a new oil mill in Saint Rémy. This land is dominated by the limestone cliffs, aromatic garrigue and forests of Alep pine and green oak which make up the rich natural spaces of the Alpilles. Enjoy an unforgettable view of Saint Rémy, nestled at the foot of the Massif, from the top of the Alpilles. The beauty of these landscapes and the wealth of flora and fauna are the reasons for the protection measures (red zone and biotope protection orders). Saint-Rémy de Provence lies at the foot of the Alpilles Massif, in the golden triangle surrounded by the Durance and the Rhône and at the heart of a region of uniquely diverse landscapes, including La Crau, Camargue and Le Comtat. The Alpilles are a small rocky limestone massif, which starts at the Durance; they extend 40 km from East to West and 10 km across. The town is surrounded by extremely diverse landscapes which have been shaped by human activity since Antiquity. The first tribes settled at the bottom of a valley on the north face of the Alpilles in approximately 600 B.C. There was plentiful water and the forest provided them with game and wood. This wonderful site provided everything required for human settlement. The Greeks planted olive trees and vines in Provence. Stone quarries began to be operated at the foot of the Alpilles in Antiquity. The Romans created an irrigation network around Glanum, part of which is still used. In the Middle Ages, the amount of farmable land available was considerably increased by the drying out of the marshlands to the north of the town and the construction of the Réal Canal. The town of Saint-Rémy grew over the centuries; its main activities were subsistence agriculture and the operation of the quarries. From the 19th century, economic salvation for the region came from trading agricultural industry products. Agricultural specialisation resulted in a landscape characterised by rural life, with no heavy industrialisation or urban development; this is one of the main reasons for the harmonious nature of the Saint Rémy countryside. Today, vines and olive trees are grown to the south, at the foot of the rocky cliffs, the forest and the garrigue of the Alpilles. A rich agricultural plain extends in the other three directions, interspersed with cypress bushes and covered mainly with fruit trees, vegetable crops, fields of cereals and sunflowers. Ewes and horses are also bred there. The water from the canals does not reach the foot of the Alpilles, where most of the vineyards and olive groves are. The vineyards are organic and many vintages are classified as ‘Les Baux de Provence’ AOC. In 1956, a terrible frost killed all the region’s olive groves; some trees grew back from stumps, and many more have been planted over the last few years, resulting in the construction of a new oil mill in Saint Rémy. This land is dominated by the limestone cliffs, aromatic garrigue and forests of Alep pine and green oak which make up the rich natural spaces of the Alpilles. Enjoy an unforgettable view of Saint Rémy, nestled at the foot of the Massif, from the top of the Alpilles. The beauty of these landscapes and the wealth of flora and fauna are the reasons for the protection measures (red zone and biotope protection orders). Saint-Rémy de Provence lies at the foot of the Alpilles Massif, in the golden triangle surrounded by the Durance and the Rhône and at the heart of a region of uniquely diverse landscapes, including La Crau, Camargue and Le Comtat. The Alpilles are a small rocky limestone massif, which starts at the Durance; they extend 40 km from East to West and 10 km across. The town is surrounded by extremely diverse landscapes which have been shaped by human activity since Antiquity. The first tribes settled at the bottom of a valley on the north face of the Alpilles in approximately 600 B.C. There was plentiful water and the forest provided them with game and wood. This wonderful site provided everything required for human settlement. The Greeks planted olive trees and vines in Provence. Stone quarries began to be operated at the foot of the Alpilles in Antiquity. The Romans created an irrigation network around Glanum, part of which is still used. In the Middle Ages, the amount of farmable land available was considerably increased by the drying out of the marshlands to the north of the town and the construction of the Réal Canal. The town of Saint-Rémy grew over the centuries; its main activities were subsistence agriculture and the operation of the quarries. From the 19th century, economic salvation for the region came from trading agricultural industry products. Agricultural specialisation resulted in a landscape characterised by rural life, with no heavy industrialisation or urban development; this is one of the main reasons for the harmonious nature of the Saint Rémy countryside. Today, vines and olive trees are grown to the south, at the foot of the rocky cliffs, the forest and the garrigue of the Alpilles. A rich agricultural plain extends in the other three directions, interspersed with cypress bushes and covered mainly with fruit trees, vegetable crops, fields of cereals and sunflowers. Ewes and horses are also bred there. The water from the canals does not reach the foot of the Alpilles, where most of the vineyards and olive groves are. The vineyards are organic and many vintages are classified as ‘Les Baux de Provence’ AOC. In 1956, a terrible frost killed all the region’s olive groves; some trees grew back from stumps, and many more have been planted over the last few years, resulting in the construction of a new oil mill in Saint Rémy. This land is dominated by the limestone cliffs, aromatic garrigue and forests of Alep pine and green oak which make up the rich natural spaces of the Alpilles. Enjoy an unforgettable view of Saint Rémy, nestled at the foot of the Massif, from the top of the Alpilles. The beauty of these landscapes and the wealth of flora and fauna are the reasons for the protection measures (red zone and biotope protection orders). Saint-Rémy de Provence lies at the foot of the Alpilles Massif, in the golden triangle surrounded by the Durance and the Rhône and at the heart of a region of uniquely diverse landscapes, including La Crau, Camargue and Le Comtat. The Alpilles are a small rocky limestone massif, which starts at the Durance; they extend 40 km from East to West and 10 km across. The town is surrounded by extremely diverse landscapes which have been shaped by human activity since Antiquity. The first tribes settled at the bottom of a valley on the north face of the Alpilles in approximately 600 B.C. There was plentiful water and the forest provided them with game and wood. This wonderful site provided everything required for human settlement. The Greeks planted olive trees and vines in Provence. Stone quarries began to be operated at the foot of the Alpilles in Antiquity. The Romans created an irrigation network around Glanum, part of which is still used. In the Middle Ages, the amount of farmable land available was considerably increased by the drying out of the marshlands to the north of the town and the construction of the Réal Canal. The town of Saint-Rémy grew over the centuries; its main activities were subsistence agriculture and the operation of the quarries. From the 19th century, economic salvation for the region came from trading agricultural industry products. Agricultural specialisation resulted in a landscape characterised by rural life, with no heavy industrialisation or urban development; this is one of the main reasons for the harmonious nature of the Saint Rémy countryside. Today, vines and olive trees are grown to the south, at the foot of the rocky cliffs, the forest and the garrigue of the Alpilles. A rich agricultural plain extends in the other three directions, interspersed with cypress bushes and covered mainly with fruit trees, vegetable crops, fields of cereals and sunflowers. Ewes and horses are also bred there. The water from the canals does not reach the foot of the Alpilles, where most of the vineyards and olive groves are. The vineyards are organic and many vintages are classified as ‘Les Baux de Provence’ AOC. In 1956, a terrible frost killed all the region’s olive groves; some trees grew back from stumps, and many more have been planted over the last few years, resulting in the construction of a new oil mill in Saint Rémy. This land is dominated by the limestone cliffs, aromatic garrigue and forests of Alep pine and green oak which make up the rich natural spaces of the Alpilles. Enjoy an unforgettable view of Saint Rémy, nestled at the foot of the Massif, from the top of the Alpilles. The beauty of these landscapes and the wealth of flora and fauna are the reasons for the protection measures (red zone and biotope protection orders). Saint-Rémy de Provence lies at the foot of the Alpilles Massif, in the golden triangle surrounded by the Durance and the Rhône and at the heart of a region of uniquely diverse landscapes, including La Crau, Camargue and Le Comtat. The Alpilles are a small rocky limestone massif, which starts at the Durance; they extend 40 km from East to West and 10 km across. The town is surrounded by extremely diverse landscapes which have been shaped by human activity since Antiquity. The first tribes settled at the bottom of a valley on the north face of the Alpilles in approximately 600 B.C. There was plentiful water and the forest provided them with game and wood. This wonderful site provided everything required for human settlement. The Greeks planted olive trees and vines in Provence. Stone quarries began to be operated at the foot of the Alpilles in Antiquity. The Romans created an irrigation network around Glanum, part of which is still used. In the Middle Ages, the amount of farmable land available was considerably increased by the drying out of the marshlands to the north of the town and the construction of the Réal Canal. The town of Saint-Rémy grew over the centuries; its main activities were subsistence agriculture and the operation of the quarries. From the 19th century, economic salvation for the region came from trading agricultural industry products. Agricultural specialisation resulted in a landscape characterised by rural life, with no heavy industrialisation or urban development; this is one of the main reasons for the harmonious nature of the Saint Rémy countryside. Today, vines and olive trees are grown to the south, at the foot of the rocky cliffs, the forest and the garrigue of the Alpilles. A rich agricultural plain extends in the other three directions, interspersed with cypress bushes and covered mainly with fruit trees, vegetable crops, fields of cereals and sunflowers. Ewes and horses are also bred there. The water from the canals does not reach the foot of the Alpilles, where most of the vineyards and olive groves are. The vineyards are organic and many vintages are classified as ‘Les Baux de Provence’ AOC. In 1956, a terrible frost killed all the region’s olive groves; some trees grew back from stumps, and many more have been planted over the last few years, resulting in the construction of a new oil mill in Saint Rémy. This land is dominated by the limestone cliffs, aromatic garrigue and forests of Alep pine and green oak which make up the rich natural spaces of the Alpilles. Enjoy an unforgettable view of Saint Rémy, nestled at the foot of the Massif, from the top of the Alpilles. The beauty of these landscapes and the wealth of flora and fauna are the reasons for the protection measures (red zone and biotope protection orders). Saint-Rémy de Provence lies at the foot of the Alpilles Massif, in the golden triangle surrounded by the Durance and the Rhône and at the heart of a region of uniquely diverse landscapes, including La Crau, Camargue and Le Comtat. The Alpilles are a small rocky limestone massif, which starts at the Durance; they extend 40 km from East to West and 10 km across. The town is surrounded by extremely diverse landscapes which have been shaped by human activity since Antiquity. The first tribes settled at the bottom of a valley on the north face of the Alpilles in approximately 600 B.C. There was plentiful water and the forest provided them with game and wood. This wonderful site provided everything required for human settlement. The Greeks planted olive trees and vines in Provence. Stone quarries began to be operated at the foot of the Alpilles in Antiquity. The Romans created an irrigation network around Glanum, part of which is still used. In the Middle Ages, the amount of farmable land available was considerably increased by the drying out of the marshlands to the north of the town and the construction of the Réal Canal. The town of Saint-Rémy grew over the centuries; its main activities were subsistence agriculture and the operation of the quarries. From the 19th century, economic salvation for the region came from trading agricultural industry products. Agricultural specialisation resulted in a landscape characterised by rural life, with no heavy industrialisation or urban development; this is one of the main reasons for the harmonious nature of the Saint Rémy countryside. Today, vines and olive trees are grown to the south, at the foot of the rocky cliffs, the forest and the garrigue of the Alpilles. A rich agricultural plain extends in the other three directions, interspersed with cypress bushes and covered mainly with fruit trees, vegetable crops, fields of cereals and sunflowers. Ewes and horses are also bred there. The water from the canals does not reach the foot of the Alpilles, where most of the vineyards and olive groves are. The vineyards are organic and many vintages are classified as ‘Les Baux de Provence’ AOC. In 1956, a terrible frost killed all the region’s olive groves; some trees grew back from stumps, and many more have been planted over the last few years, resulting in the construction of a new oil mill in Saint Rémy. This land is dominated by the limestone cliffs, aromatic garrigue and forests of Alep pine and green oak which make up the rich natural spaces of the Alpilles. Enjoy an unforgettable view of Saint Rémy, nestled at the foot of the Massif, from the top of the Alpilles. The beauty of these landscapes and the wealth of flora and fauna are the reasons for the protection measures (red zone and biotope protection orders). Saint-Rémy de Provence lies at the foot of the Alpilles Massif, in the golden triangle surrounded by the Durance and the Rhône and at the heart of a region of uniquely diverse landscapes, including La Crau, Camargue and Le Comtat. The Alpilles are a small rocky limestone massif, which starts at the Durance; they extend 40 km from East to West and 10 km across. The town is surrounded by extremely diverse landscapes which have been shaped by human activity since Antiquity. The first tribes settled at the bottom of a valley on the north face of the Alpilles in approximately 600 B.C. There was plentiful water and the forest provided them with game and wood. This wonderful site provided everything required for human settlement. The Greeks planted olive trees and vines in Provence. Stone quarries began to be operated at the foot of the Alpilles in Antiquity. The Romans created an irrigation network around Glanum, part of which is still used. In the Middle Ages, the amount of farmable land available was considerably increased by the drying out of the marshlands to the north of the town and the construction of the Réal Canal. The town of Saint-Rémy grew over the centuries; its main activities were subsistence agriculture and the operation of the quarries. From the 19th century, economic salvation for the region came from trading agricultural industry products. Agricultural specialisation resulted in a landscape characterised by rural life, with no heavy industrialisation or urban development; this is one of the main reasons for the harmonious nature of the Saint Rémy countryside. Today, vines and olive trees are grown to the south, at the foot of the rocky cliffs, the forest and the garrigue of the Alpilles. A rich agricultural plain extends in the other three directions, interspersed with cypress bushes and covered mainly with fruit trees, vegetable crops, fields of cereals and sunflowers. Ewes and horses are also bred there. The water from the canals does not reach the foot of the Alpilles, where most of the vineyards and olive groves are. The vineyards are organic and many vintages are classified as ‘Les Baux de Provence’ AOC. In 1956, a terrible frost killed all the region’s olive groves; some trees grew back from stumps, and many more have been planted over the last few years, resulting in the construction of a new oil mill in Saint Rémy. This land is dominated by the limestone cliffs, aromatic garrigue and forests of Alep pine and green oak which make up the rich natural spaces of the Alpilles. Enjoy an unforgettable view of Saint Rémy, nestled at the foot of the Massif, from the top of the Alpilles. The beauty of these landscapes and the wealth of flora and fauna are the reasons for the protection measures (red zone and biotope protection orders).


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