Alpilles

    Saint paul de Mausole Cloister

    €5,00

    Category: Tag:

    Address

    address

    Chemin Saint-Paul

    Town

    Saint-Rémy-de-Provence

    Postal code

    13210

    Website

    http://www.saintpauldemausole.fr/van-gogh.html

    Map


    Description

    The monastery is named after the nearby mausoleum of Glanum. From 982 onwards the monastery was a priory of the abbey of Saint-André of Villeneuve-lès-Avignon before becoming the seat of a monastery of canons under the rule of St Augustine in 1080.[. ][] In 1316 the newly-elected Pope John XXII annexed the monastery to the property of the canonical chapter of Notre-Dame des Doms d’Avignon cathedral. The cloister dates back to the 11th and 12th centuries and is a masterpiece of Provençal Romanesque art. It backs onto the chapel in pure Romanesque style with its facade modified in the 18th century, and which is crowned by a square, Lombard-style belfry. The monastery is most famous for having been Vincent van Gogh’s home from May 1889 to May 1890, when the painter was confined here at his own request. Van Gogh was fascinated and greatly inspired by the quality of the light and fiery beauty of the landscapes that he discovered in Saint Rémy. He finished almost 150 paintings and numerous drawings over a year spent in a peaceful atmosphere surrounded by the nuns and other staff who welcomed him. The artist painted and drew major works here, the best known of which include: self-portraits, Starry Night, Iris, The Cypresses, Wheat Field with a Reaper, View of the Church of Saint-Paul-de-Mausole, Fountain in the Garden of Saint-Paul Hospital, The Garden of Saint-Paul Hospital, The Entrance Hall of Saint-Paul Hospital, Vincent’s Room at Saint-Paul Hospital, Corridor in Saint-Paul Hospital, View of the Alpilles, Hill at Saint-Rémy, and Trees in the Garden of Saint-Paul Hospital. A museum tracing the period that van Gogh was interned in the hospital is housed in a wing of the cloister. You can visit a re-creation of van Gogh’s bedroom, and on the tour to ‘Van Gogh’s field’ you can admire more than 20 large-scale reproductions of his most famous works on the sites where they were actually painted. A sculpture depicting the bust of the painter can be found in the alley of the cloister. The visitor is struck by the great calmness of this spot, which remains a hospital to this day. You can also enjoy an unguided walk in the footsteps of Vincent van Gogh. Mass is celebrated in the chapel of Saint-Paul de Mausole on Saturdays in winter at 5pm. The monastery is named after the nearby mausoleum of Glanum. From 982 onwards the monastery was a priory of the abbey of Saint-André of Villeneuve-lès-Avignon before becoming the seat of a monastery of canons under the rule of St Augustine in 1080.[. ][] In 1316 the newly-elected Pope John XXII annexed the monastery to the property of the canonical chapter of Notre-Dame des Doms d’Avignon cathedral. The cloister dates back to the 11th and 12th centuries and is a masterpiece of Provençal Romanesque art. It backs onto the chapel in pure Romanesque style with its facade modified in the 18th century, and which is crowned by a square, Lombard-style belfry. The monastery is most famous for having been Vincent van Gogh’s home from May 1889 to May 1890, when the painter was confined here at his own request. Van Gogh was fascinated and greatly inspired by the quality of the light and fiery beauty of the landscapes that he discovered in Saint Rémy. He finished almost 150 paintings and numerous drawings over a year spent in a peaceful atmosphere surrounded by the nuns and other staff who welcomed him. The artist painted and drew major works here, the best known of which include: self-portraits, Starry Night, Iris, The Cypresses, Wheat Field with a Reaper, View of the Church of Saint-Paul-de-Mausole, Fountain in the Garden of Saint-Paul Hospital, The Garden of Saint-Paul Hospital, The Entrance Hall of Saint-Paul Hospital, Vincent’s Room at Saint-Paul Hospital, Corridor in Saint-Paul Hospital, View of the Alpilles, Hill at Saint-Rémy, and Trees in the Garden of Saint-Paul Hospital. A museum tracing the period that van Gogh was interned in the hospital is housed in a wing of the cloister. You can visit a re-creation of van Gogh’s bedroom, and on the tour to ‘Van Gogh’s field’ you can admire more than 20 large-scale reproductions of his most famous works on the sites where they were actually painted. A sculpture depicting the bust of the painter can be found in the alley of the cloister. The visitor is struck by the great calmness of this spot, which remains a hospital to this day. You can also enjoy an unguided walk in the footsteps of Vincent van Gogh. Mass is celebrated in the chapel of Saint-Paul de Mausole on Saturdays in winter at 5pm. The monastery is named after the nearby mausoleum of Glanum. From 982 onwards the monastery was a priory of the abbey of Saint-André of Villeneuve-lès-Avignon before becoming the seat of a monastery of canons under the rule of St Augustine in 1080.[. ][] In 1316 the newly-elected Pope John XXII annexed the monastery to the property of the canonical chapter of Notre-Dame des Doms d’Avignon cathedral. The cloister dates back to the 11th and 12th centuries and is a masterpiece of Provençal Romanesque art. It backs onto the chapel in pure Romanesque style with its facade modified in the 18th century, and which is crowned by a square, Lombard-style belfry. The monastery is most famous for having been Vincent van Gogh’s home from May 1889 to May 1890, when the painter was confined here at his own request. Van Gogh was fascinated and greatly inspired by the quality of the light and fiery beauty of the landscapes that he discovered in Saint Rémy. He finished almost 150 paintings and numerous drawings over a year spent in a peaceful atmosphere surrounded by the nuns and other staff who welcomed him. The artist painted and drew major works here, the best known of which include: self-portraits, Starry Night, Iris, The Cypresses, Wheat Field with a Reaper, View of the Church of Saint-Paul-de-Mausole, Fountain in the Garden of Saint-Paul Hospital, The Garden of Saint-Paul Hospital, The Entrance Hall of Saint-Paul Hospital, Vincent’s Room at Saint-Paul Hospital, Corridor in Saint-Paul Hospital, View of the Alpilles, Hill at Saint-Rémy, and Trees in the Garden of Saint-Paul Hospital. A museum tracing the period that van Gogh was interned in the hospital is housed in a wing of the cloister. You can visit a re-creation of van Gogh’s bedroom, and on the tour to ‘Van Gogh’s field’ you can admire more than 20 large-scale reproductions of his most famous works on the sites where they were actually painted. A sculpture depicting the bust of the painter can be found in the alley of the cloister. The visitor is struck by the great calmness of this spot, which remains a hospital to this day. You can also enjoy an unguided walk in the footsteps of Vincent van Gogh. Mass is celebrated in the chapel of Saint-Paul de Mausole on Saturdays in winter at 5pm. The monastery is named after the nearby mausoleum of Glanum. From 982 onwards the monastery was a priory of the abbey of Saint-André of Villeneuve-lès-Avignon before becoming the seat of a monastery of canons under the rule of St Augustine in 1080.[. ][] In 1316 the newly-elected Pope John XXII annexed the monastery to the property of the canonical chapter of Notre-Dame des Doms d’Avignon cathedral. The cloister dates back to the 11th and 12th centuries and is a masterpiece of Provençal Romanesque art. It backs onto the chapel in pure Romanesque style with its facade modified in the 18th century, and which is crowned by a square, Lombard-style belfry. The monastery is most famous for having been Vincent van Gogh’s home from May 1889 to May 1890, when the painter was confined here at his own request. Van Gogh was fascinated and greatly inspired by the quality of the light and fiery beauty of the landscapes that he discovered in Saint Rémy. He finished almost 150 paintings and numerous drawings over a year spent in a peaceful atmosphere surrounded by the nuns and other staff who welcomed him. The artist painted and drew major works here, the best known of which include: self-portraits, Starry Night, Iris, The Cypresses, Wheat Field with a Reaper, View of the Church of Saint-Paul-de-Mausole, Fountain in the Garden of Saint-Paul Hospital, The Garden of Saint-Paul Hospital, The Entrance Hall of Saint-Paul Hospital, Vincent’s Room at Saint-Paul Hospital, Corridor in Saint-Paul Hospital, View of the Alpilles, Hill at Saint-Rémy, and Trees in the Garden of Saint-Paul Hospital. A museum tracing the period that van Gogh was interned in the hospital is housed in a wing of the cloister. You can visit a re-creation of van Gogh’s bedroom, and on the tour to ‘Van Gogh’s field’ you can admire more than 20 large-scale reproductions of his most famous works on the sites where they were actually painted. A sculpture depicting the bust of the painter can be found in the alley of the cloister. The visitor is struck by the great calmness of this spot, which remains a hospital to this day. You can also enjoy an unguided walk in the footsteps of Vincent van Gogh. Mass is celebrated in the chapel of Saint-Paul de Mausole on Saturdays in winter at 5pm. The monastery is named after the nearby mausoleum of Glanum. From 982 onwards the monastery was a priory of the abbey of Saint-André of Villeneuve-lès-Avignon before becoming the seat of a monastery of canons under the rule of St Augustine in 1080.[. ][] In 1316 the newly-elected Pope John XXII annexed the monastery to the property of the canonical chapter of Notre-Dame des Doms d’Avignon cathedral. The cloister dates back to the 11th and 12th centuries and is a masterpiece of Provençal Romanesque art. It backs onto the chapel in pure Romanesque style with its facade modified in the 18th century, and which is crowned by a square, Lombard-style belfry. The monastery is most famous for having been Vincent van Gogh’s home from May 1889 to May 1890, when the painter was confined here at his own request. Van Gogh was fascinated and greatly inspired by the quality of the light and fiery beauty of the landscapes that he discovered in Saint Rémy. He finished almost 150 paintings and numerous drawings over a year spent in a peaceful atmosphere surrounded by the nuns and other staff who welcomed him. The artist painted and drew major works here, the best known of which include: self-portraits, Starry Night, Iris, The Cypresses, Wheat Field with a Reaper, View of the Church of Saint-Paul-de-Mausole, Fountain in the Garden of Saint-Paul Hospital, The Garden of Saint-Paul Hospital, The Entrance Hall of Saint-Paul Hospital, Vincent’s Room at Saint-Paul Hospital, Corridor in Saint-Paul Hospital, View of the Alpilles, Hill at Saint-Rémy, and Trees in the Garden of Saint-Paul Hospital. A museum tracing the period that van Gogh was interned in the hospital is housed in a wing of the cloister. You can visit a re-creation of van Gogh’s bedroom, and on the tour to ‘Van Gogh’s field’ you can admire more than 20 large-scale reproductions of his most famous works on the sites where they were actually painted. A sculpture depicting the bust of the painter can be found in the alley of the cloister. The visitor is struck by the great calmness of this spot, which remains a hospital to this day. You can also enjoy an unguided walk in the footsteps of Vincent van Gogh. Mass is celebrated in the chapel of Saint-Paul de Mausole on Saturdays in winter at 5pm. The monastery is named after the nearby mausoleum of Glanum. From 982 onwards the monastery was a priory of the abbey of Saint-André of Villeneuve-lès-Avignon before becoming the seat of a monastery of canons under the rule of St Augustine in 1080.[. ][] In 1316 the newly-elected Pope John XXII annexed the monastery to the property of the canonical chapter of Notre-Dame des Doms d’Avignon cathedral. The cloister dates back to the 11th and 12th centuries and is a masterpiece of Provençal Romanesque art. It backs onto the chapel in pure Romanesque style with its facade modified in the 18th century, and which is crowned by a square, Lombard-style belfry. The monastery is most famous for having been Vincent van Gogh’s home from May 1889 to May 1890, when the painter was confined here at his own request. Van Gogh was fascinated and greatly inspired by the quality of the light and fiery beauty of the landscapes that he discovered in Saint Rémy. He finished almost 150 paintings and numerous drawings over a year spent in a peaceful atmosphere surrounded by the nuns and other staff who welcomed him. The artist painted and drew major works here, the best known of which include: self-portraits, Starry Night, Iris, The Cypresses, Wheat Field with a Reaper, View of the Church of Saint-Paul-de-Mausole, Fountain in the Garden of Saint-Paul Hospital, The Garden of Saint-Paul Hospital, The Entrance Hall of Saint-Paul Hospital, Vincent’s Room at Saint-Paul Hospital, Corridor in Saint-Paul Hospital, View of the Alpilles, Hill at Saint-Rémy, and Trees in the Garden of Saint-Paul Hospital. A museum tracing the period that van Gogh was interned in the hospital is housed in a wing of the cloister. You can visit a re-creation of van Gogh’s bedroom, and on the tour to ‘Van Gogh’s field’ you can admire more than 20 large-scale reproductions of his most famous works on the sites where they were actually painted. A sculpture depicting the bust of the painter can be found in the alley of the cloister. The visitor is struck by the great calmness of this spot, which remains a hospital to this day. You can also enjoy an unguided walk in the footsteps of Vincent van Gogh. Mass is celebrated in the chapel of Saint-Paul de Mausole on Saturdays in winter at 5pm. The monastery is named after the nearby mausoleum of Glanum. From 982 onwards the monastery was a priory of the abbey of Saint-André of Villeneuve-lès-Avignon before becoming the seat of a monastery of canons under the rule of St Augustine in 1080.[. ][] In 1316 the newly-elected Pope John XXII annexed the monastery to the property of the canonical chapter of Notre-Dame des Doms d’Avignon cathedral. The cloister dates back to the 11th and 12th centuries and is a masterpiece of Provençal Romanesque art. It backs onto the chapel in pure Romanesque style with its facade modified in the 18th century, and which is crowned by a square, Lombard-style belfry. The monastery is most famous for having been Vincent van Gogh’s home from May 1889 to May 1890, when the painter was confined here at his own request. Van Gogh was fascinated and greatly inspired by the quality of the light and fiery beauty of the landscapes that he discovered in Saint Rémy. He finished almost 150 paintings and numerous drawings over a year spent in a peaceful atmosphere surrounded by the nuns and other staff who welcomed him. The artist painted and drew major works here, the best known of which include: self-portraits, Starry Night, Iris, The Cypresses, Wheat Field with a Reaper, View of the Church of Saint-Paul-de-Mausole, Fountain in the Garden of Saint-Paul Hospital, The Garden of Saint-Paul Hospital, The Entrance Hall of Saint-Paul Hospital, Vincent’s Room at Saint-Paul Hospital, Corridor in Saint-Paul Hospital, View of the Alpilles, Hill at Saint-Rémy, and Trees in the Garden of Saint-Paul Hospital. A museum tracing the period that van Gogh was interned in the hospital is housed in a wing of the cloister. You can visit a re-creation of van Gogh’s bedroom, and on the tour to ‘Van Gogh’s field’ you can admire more than 20 large-scale reproductions of his most famous works on the sites where they were actually painted. A sculpture depicting the bust of the painter can be found in the alley of the cloister. The visitor is struck by the great calmness of this spot, which remains a hospital to this day. You can also enjoy an unguided walk in the footsteps of Vincent van Gogh. Mass is celebrated in the chapel of Saint-Paul de Mausole on Saturdays in winter at 5pm. The monastery is named after the nearby mausoleum of Glanum. From 982 onwards the monastery was a priory of the abbey of Saint-André of Villeneuve-lès-Avignon before becoming the seat of a monastery of canons under the rule of St Augustine in 1080.[. ][] In 1316 the newly-elected Pope John XXII annexed the monastery to the property of the canonical chapter of Notre-Dame des Doms d’Avignon cathedral. The cloister dates back to the 11th and 12th centuries and is a masterpiece of Provençal Romanesque art. It backs onto the chapel in pure Romanesque style with its facade modified in the 18th century, and which is crowned by a square, Lombard-style belfry. The monastery is most famous for having been Vincent van Gogh’s home from May 1889 to May 1890, when the painter was confined here at his own request. Van Gogh was fascinated and greatly inspired by the quality of the light and fiery beauty of the landscapes that he discovered in Saint Rémy. He finished almost 150 paintings and numerous drawings over a year spent in a peaceful atmosphere surrounded by the nuns and other staff who welcomed him. The artist painted and drew major works here, the best known of which include: self-portraits, Starry Night, Iris, The Cypresses, Wheat Field with a Reaper, View of the Church of Saint-Paul-de-Mausole, Fountain in the Garden of Saint-Paul Hospital, The Garden of Saint-Paul Hospital, The Entrance Hall of Saint-Paul Hospital, Vincent’s Room at Saint-Paul Hospital, Corridor in Saint-Paul Hospital, View of the Alpilles, Hill at Saint-Rémy, and Trees in the Garden of Saint-Paul Hospital. A museum tracing the period that van Gogh was interned in the hospital is housed in a wing of the cloister. You can visit a re-creation of van Gogh’s bedroom, and on the tour to ‘Van Gogh’s field’ you can admire more than 20 large-scale reproductions of his most famous works on the sites where they were actually painted. A sculpture depicting the bust of the painter can be found in the alley of the cloister. The visitor is struck by the great calmness of this spot, which remains a hospital to this day. You can also enjoy an unguided walk in the footsteps of Vincent van Gogh. Mass is celebrated in the chapel of Saint-Paul de Mausole on Saturdays in winter at 5pm. One wing of the former monastery’s pretty Romanesque cloisters now houses a museum recounting Vincent van Gogh’s stay as a mental patient in the Saint Paul hospital. Visitors can also see a deeply moving reproduction of the brilliant painter’s bedroom, with the view over a wheat field that the artist contemplated at length and made fifteen paintings of during his stay. A tour of ‘Van Gogh’s Field’ takes you out to see where he painted many of his most famous paintings, with more than 20 large-scale reproductions displayed on site. Saint Paul de Mausole still operates as a mental health institution so it’s important to respect and maintain the peaceful atmosphere. In 1995 an Art Therapy workshop called Valetudo was set up at Saint Paul as a complement to medical treatment, combining art, research and medical care. One wing of the former monastery’s pretty Romanesque cloisters now houses a museum recounting Vincent van Gogh’s stay as a mental patient in the Saint Paul hospital. Visitors can also see a deeply moving reproduction of the brilliant painter’s bedroom, with the view over a wheat field that the artist contemplated at length and made fifteen paintings of during his stay. A tour of ‘Van Gogh’s Field’ takes you out to see where he painted many of his most famous paintings, with more than 20 large-scale reproductions displayed on site. Saint Paul de Mausole still operates as a mental health institution so it’s important to respect and maintain the peaceful atmosphere. In 1995 an Art Therapy workshop called Valetudo was set up at Saint Paul as a complement to medical treatment, combining art, research and medical care. One wing of the former monastery’s pretty Romanesque cloisters now houses a museum recounting Vincent van Gogh’s stay as a mental patient in the Saint Paul hospital. Visitors can also see a deeply moving reproduction of the brilliant painter’s bedroom, with the view over a wheat field that the artist contemplated at length and made fifteen paintings of during his stay. A tour of ‘Van Gogh’s Field’ takes you out to see where he painted many of his most famous paintings, with more than 20 large-scale reproductions displayed on site. Saint Paul de Mausole still operates as a mental health institution so it’s important to respect and maintain the peaceful atmosphere. In 1995 an Art Therapy workshop called Valetudo was set up at Saint Paul as a complement to medical treatment, combining art, research and medical care. One wing of the former monastery’s pretty Romanesque cloisters now houses a museum recounting Vincent van Gogh’s stay as a mental patient in the Saint Paul hospital. Visitors can also see a deeply moving reproduction of the brilliant painter’s bedroom, with the view over a wheat field that the artist contemplated at length and made fifteen paintings of during his stay. A tour of ‘Van Gogh’s Field’ takes you out to see where he painted many of his most famous paintings, with more than 20 large-scale reproductions displayed on site. Saint Paul de Mausole still operates as a mental health institution so it’s important to respect and maintain the peaceful atmosphere. In 1995 an Art Therapy workshop called Valetudo was set up at Saint Paul as a complement to medical treatment, combining art, research and medical care. One wing of the former monastery’s pretty Romanesque cloisters now houses a museum recounting Vincent van Gogh’s stay as a mental patient in the Saint Paul hospital. Visitors can also see a deeply moving reproduction of the brilliant painter’s bedroom, with the view over a wheat field that the artist contemplated at length and made fifteen paintings of during his stay. A tour of ‘Van Gogh’s Field’ takes you out to see where he painted many of his most famous paintings, with more than 20 large-scale reproductions displayed on site. Saint Paul de Mausole still operates as a mental health institution so it’s important to respect and maintain the peaceful atmosphere. In 1995 an Art Therapy workshop called Valetudo was set up at Saint Paul as a complement to medical treatment, combining art, research and medical care.


    Practical Information

    Full price (in €)

    5,00

    Price conditions

    Full price : 5 € / Reduced price: 3,5 €

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