Alpilles

    Saint Gabriel de Tarascon Chapel

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    Tarascon

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    Chapel of St Gabriel This 12th-century chapel is one of the finest examples of Provençal Romanesque art inspired by antiquity. It was included in the first-ever list of French Historic Monuments at the suggestion of Prosper Mérimée, erstwhile inspector-general of the French Commission for Historic Monuments, at the same time as the cloister of the Church of St Trophîme in Arles. Architectural studies have highlighted the close links between the chapel’s architecture and sculpture and the north gallery of the cloister of St Trophîme (circa 1170), as well as the west portal of Saint-Paul-Trois-Châteaux Cathedral (circa 1180). The chapel can be dated in all likelihood, therefore, to around 1175. The facade of the chapel has a rather complex structure: a first portal, topped by a carved tympanum, forms an integral part of a second portal surmounted by a classical-style triangular pediment. This double portal is housed beneath a huge semicircular discharging arch, which is itself topped by an oculus surrounded by the tetramorph and lodged under a pointed arch. The church facade is rich in decoration inspired by antiquity with columns surmounted by acanthus-leaf capitals. St Gabriel also boasts purely Romanesque carved decorative work, such as the tympanum on the first portal depicting Daniel in the lions’ den (on the left), and Adam and Eve next to the tree of knowledge of good and evil surrounded by the snake (on the right). On entering the chapel, the light and wealth of decoration on the portal give way to shadow and simplicity. A single rectangular nave is divided into three barrel-vaulted bays separated by twin-projecting transverse arches supported by abutments to floor-level. In Roman times the site was situated at the intersection of two major branches of the mythical route travelled by Hercules. One of these roads, the Via Domitia, followed the river Durance, crossing it at Cavaillon to the north of the Alpilles before passing through Glanum (Saint-Rémy-de-Provence) and Ernaginum. The other road, which came from the coast over the plain of La Crau, also served as the northern branch of the Via Aurelia from Aix-en-Provence, coming to an end at St Gabriel next to a large area of marshland. A third road connected Avignon and Arles. The route here was so marshy that utricularii (‘raft masters’) were needed to help people and goods across, with the result that the site became an important settlement in antiquity. The community declined, however, as the marshes gradually began to dry out. Chapel of St Gabriel This 12th-century chapel is one of the finest examples of Provençal Romanesque art inspired by antiquity. It was included in the first-ever list of French Historic Monuments at the suggestion of Prosper Mérimée, erstwhile inspector-general of the French Commission for Historic Monuments, at the same time as the cloister of the Church of St Trophîme in Arles. Architectural studies have highlighted the close links between the chapel’s architecture and sculpture and the north gallery of the cloister of St Trophîme (circa 1170), as well as the west portal of Saint-Paul-Trois-Châteaux Cathedral (circa 1180). The chapel can be dated in all likelihood, therefore, to around 1175. The facade of the chapel has a rather complex structure: a first portal, topped by a carved tympanum, forms an integral part of a second portal surmounted by a classical-style triangular pediment. This double portal is housed beneath a huge semicircular discharging arch, which is itself topped by an oculus surrounded by the tetramorph and lodged under a pointed arch. The church facade is rich in decoration inspired by antiquity with columns surmounted by acanthus-leaf capitals. St Gabriel also boasts purely Romanesque carved decorative work, such as the tympanum on the first portal depicting Daniel in the lions’ den (on the left), and Adam and Eve next to the tree of knowledge of good and evil surrounded by the snake (on the right). On entering the chapel, the light and wealth of decoration on the portal give way to shadow and simplicity. A single rectangular nave is divided into three barrel-vaulted bays separated by twin-projecting transverse arches supported by abutments to floor-level. In Roman times the site was situated at the intersection of two major branches of the mythical route travelled by Hercules. One of these roads, the Via Domitia, followed the river Durance, crossing it at Cavaillon to the north of the Alpilles before passing through Glanum (Saint-Rémy-de-Provence) and Ernaginum. The other road, which came from the coast over the plain of La Crau, also served as the northern branch of the Via Aurelia from Aix-en-Provence, coming to an end at St Gabriel next to a large area of marshland. A third road connected Avignon and Arles. The route here was so marshy that utricularii (‘raft masters’) were needed to help people and goods across, with the result that the site became an important settlement in antiquity. The community declined, however, as the marshes gradually began to dry out. Chapel of St Gabriel This 12th-century chapel is one of the finest examples of Provençal Romanesque art inspired by antiquity. It was included in the first-ever list of French Historic Monuments at the suggestion of Prosper Mérimée, erstwhile inspector-general of the French Commission for Historic Monuments, at the same time as the cloister of the Church of St Trophîme in Arles. Architectural studies have highlighted the close links between the chapel’s architecture and sculpture and the north gallery of the cloister of St Trophîme (circa 1170), as well as the west portal of Saint-Paul-Trois-Châteaux Cathedral (circa 1180). The chapel can be dated in all likelihood, therefore, to around 1175. The facade of the chapel has a rather complex structure: a first portal, topped by a carved tympanum, forms an integral part of a second portal surmounted by a classical-style triangular pediment. This double portal is housed beneath a huge semicircular discharging arch, which is itself topped by an oculus surrounded by the tetramorph and lodged under a pointed arch. The church facade is rich in decoration inspired by antiquity with columns surmounted by acanthus-leaf capitals. St Gabriel also boasts purely Romanesque carved decorative work, such as the tympanum on the first portal depicting Daniel in the lions’ den (on the left), and Adam and Eve next to the tree of knowledge of good and evil surrounded by the snake (on the right). On entering the chapel, the light and wealth of decoration on the portal give way to shadow and simplicity. A single rectangular nave is divided into three barrel-vaulted bays separated by twin-projecting transverse arches supported by abutments to floor-level. In Roman times the site was situated at the intersection of two major branches of the mythical route travelled by Hercules. One of these roads, the Via Domitia, followed the river Durance, crossing it at Cavaillon to the north of the Alpilles before passing through Glanum (Saint-Rémy-de-Provence) and Ernaginum. The other road, which came from the coast over the plain of La Crau, also served as the northern branch of the Via Aurelia from Aix-en-Provence, coming to an end at St Gabriel next to a large area of marshland. A third road connected Avignon and Arles. The route here was so marshy that utricularii (‘raft masters’) were needed to help people and goods across, with the result that the site became an important settlement in antiquity. The community declined, however, as the marshes gradually began to dry out. Chapel of St Gabriel This 12th-century chapel is one of the finest examples of Provençal Romanesque art inspired by antiquity. It was included in the first-ever list of French Historic Monuments at the suggestion of Prosper Mérimée, erstwhile inspector-general of the French Commission for Historic Monuments, at the same time as the cloister of the Church of St Trophîme in Arles. Architectural studies have highlighted the close links between the chapel’s architecture and sculpture and the north gallery of the cloister of St Trophîme (circa 1170), as well as the west portal of Saint-Paul-Trois-Châteaux Cathedral (circa 1180). The chapel can be dated in all likelihood, therefore, to around 1175. The facade of the chapel has a rather complex structure: a first portal, topped by a carved tympanum, forms an integral part of a second portal surmounted by a classical-style triangular pediment. This double portal is housed beneath a huge semicircular discharging arch, which is itself topped by an oculus surrounded by the tetramorph and lodged under a pointed arch. The church facade is rich in decoration inspired by antiquity with columns surmounted by acanthus-leaf capitals. St Gabriel also boasts purely Romanesque carved decorative work, such as the tympanum on the first portal depicting Daniel in the lions’ den (on the left), and Adam and Eve next to the tree of knowledge of good and evil surrounded by the snake (on the right). On entering the chapel, the light and wealth of decoration on the portal give way to shadow and simplicity. A single rectangular nave is divided into three barrel-vaulted bays separated by twin-projecting transverse arches supported by abutments to floor-level. In Roman times the site was situated at the intersection of two major branches of the mythical route travelled by Hercules. One of these roads, the Via Domitia, followed the river Durance, crossing it at Cavaillon to the north of the Alpilles before passing through Glanum (Saint-Rémy-de-Provence) and Ernaginum. The other road, which came from the coast over the plain of La Crau, also served as the northern branch of the Via Aurelia from Aix-en-Provence, coming to an end at St Gabriel next to a large area of marshland. A third road connected Avignon and Arles. The route here was so marshy that utricularii (‘raft masters’) were needed to help people and goods across, with the result that the site became an important settlement in antiquity. The community declined, however, as the marshes gradually began to dry out. Chapel of St Gabriel This 12th-century chapel is one of the finest examples of Provençal Romanesque art inspired by antiquity. It was included in the first-ever list of French Historic Monuments at the suggestion of Prosper Mérimée, erstwhile inspector-general of the French Commission for Historic Monuments, at the same time as the cloister of the Church of St Trophîme in Arles. Architectural studies have highlighted the close links between the chapel’s architecture and sculpture and the north gallery of the cloister of St Trophîme (circa 1170), as well as the west portal of Saint-Paul-Trois-Châteaux Cathedral (circa 1180). The chapel can be dated in all likelihood, therefore, to around 1175. The facade of the chapel has a rather complex structure: a first portal, topped by a carved tympanum, forms an integral part of a second portal surmounted by a classical-style triangular pediment. This double portal is housed beneath a huge semicircular discharging arch, which is itself topped by an oculus surrounded by the tetramorph and lodged under a pointed arch. The church facade is rich in decoration inspired by antiquity with columns surmounted by acanthus-leaf capitals. St Gabriel also boasts purely Romanesque carved decorative work, such as the tympanum on the first portal depicting Daniel in the lions’ den (on the left), and Adam and Eve next to the tree of knowledge of good and evil surrounded by the snake (on the right). On entering the chapel, the light and wealth of decoration on the portal give way to shadow and simplicity. A single rectangular nave is divided into three barrel-vaulted bays separated by twin-projecting transverse arches supported by abutments to floor-level. In Roman times the site was situated at the intersection of two major branches of the mythical route travelled by Hercules. One of these roads, the Via Domitia, followed the river Durance, crossing it at Cavaillon to the north of the Alpilles before passing through Glanum (Saint-Rémy-de-Provence) and Ernaginum. The other road, which came from the coast over the plain of La Crau, also served as the northern branch of the Via Aurelia from Aix-en-Provence, coming to an end at St Gabriel next to a large area of marshland. A third road connected Avignon and Arles. The route here was so marshy that utricularii (‘raft masters’) were needed to help people and goods across, with the result that the site became an important settlement in antiquity. The community declined, however, as the marshes gradually began to dry out. Chapel of St Gabriel This 12th-century chapel is one of the finest examples of Provençal Romanesque art inspired by antiquity. It was included in the first-ever list of French Historic Monuments at the suggestion of Prosper Mérimée, erstwhile inspector-general of the French Commission for Historic Monuments, at the same time as the cloister of the Church of St Trophîme in Arles. Architectural studies have highlighted the close links between the chapel’s architecture and sculpture and the north gallery of the cloister of St Trophîme (circa 1170), as well as the west portal of Saint-Paul-Trois-Châteaux Cathedral (circa 1180). The chapel can be dated in all likelihood, therefore, to around 1175. The facade of the chapel has a rather complex structure: a first portal, topped by a carved tympanum, forms an integral part of a second portal surmounted by a classical-style triangular pediment. This double portal is housed beneath a huge semicircular discharging arch, which is itself topped by an oculus surrounded by the tetramorph and lodged under a pointed arch. The church facade is rich in decoration inspired by antiquity with columns surmounted by acanthus-leaf capitals. St Gabriel also boasts purely Romanesque carved decorative work, such as the tympanum on the first portal depicting Daniel in the lions’ den (on the left), and Adam and Eve next to the tree of knowledge of good and evil surrounded by the snake (on the right). On entering the chapel, the light and wealth of decoration on the portal give way to shadow and simplicity. A single rectangular nave is divided into three barrel-vaulted bays separated by twin-projecting transverse arches supported by abutments to floor-level. In Roman times the site was situated at the intersection of two major branches of the mythical route travelled by Hercules. One of these roads, the Via Domitia, followed the river Durance, crossing it at Cavaillon to the north of the Alpilles before passing through Glanum (Saint-Rémy-de-Provence) and Ernaginum. The other road, which came from the coast over the plain of La Crau, also served as the northern branch of the Via Aurelia from Aix-en-Provence, coming to an end at St Gabriel next to a large area of marshland. A third road connected Avignon and Arles. The route here was so marshy that utricularii (‘raft masters’) were needed to help people and goods across, with the result that the site became an important settlement in antiquity. The community declined, however, as the marshes gradually began to dry out. Chapel of St Gabriel This 12th-century chapel is one of the finest examples of Provençal Romanesque art inspired by antiquity. It was included in the first-ever list of French Historic Monuments at the suggestion of Prosper Mérimée, erstwhile inspector-general of the French Commission for Historic Monuments, at the same time as the cloister of the Church of St Trophîme in Arles. Architectural studies have highlighted the close links between the chapel’s architecture and sculpture and the north gallery of the cloister of St Trophîme (circa 1170), as well as the west portal of Saint-Paul-Trois-Châteaux Cathedral (circa 1180). The chapel can be dated in all likelihood, therefore, to around 1175. The facade of the chapel has a rather complex structure: a first portal, topped by a carved tympanum, forms an integral part of a second portal surmounted by a classical-style triangular pediment. This double portal is housed beneath a huge semicircular discharging arch, which is itself topped by an oculus surrounded by the tetramorph and lodged under a pointed arch. The church facade is rich in decoration inspired by antiquity with columns surmounted by acanthus-leaf capitals. St Gabriel also boasts purely Romanesque carved decorative work, such as the tympanum on the first portal depicting Daniel in the lions’ den (on the left), and Adam and Eve next to the tree of knowledge of good and evil surrounded by the snake (on the right). On entering the chapel, the light and wealth of decoration on the portal give way to shadow and simplicity. A single rectangular nave is divided into three barrel-vaulted bays separated by twin-projecting transverse arches supported by abutments to floor-level. In Roman times the site was situated at the intersection of two major branches of the mythical route travelled by Hercules. One of these roads, the Via Domitia, followed the river Durance, crossing it at Cavaillon to the north of the Alpilles before passing through Glanum (Saint-Rémy-de-Provence) and Ernaginum. The other road, which came from the coast over the plain of La Crau, also served as the northern branch of the Via Aurelia from Aix-en-Provence, coming to an end at St Gabriel next to a large area of marshland. A third road connected Avignon and Arles. The route here was so marshy that utricularii (‘raft masters’) were needed to help people and goods across, with the result that the site became an important settlement in antiquity. The community declined, however, as the marshes gradually began to dry out. Chapel of St Gabriel This 12th-century chapel is one of the finest examples of Provençal Romanesque art inspired by antiquity. It was included in the first-ever list of French Historic Monuments at the suggestion of Prosper Mérimée, erstwhile inspector-general of the French Commission for Historic Monuments, at the same time as the cloister of the Church of St Trophîme in Arles. Architectural studies have highlighted the close links between the chapel’s architecture and sculpture and the north gallery of the cloister of St Trophîme (circa 1170), as well as the west portal of Saint-Paul-Trois-Châteaux Cathedral (circa 1180). The chapel can be dated in all likelihood, therefore, to around 1175. The facade of the chapel has a rather complex structure: a first portal, topped by a carved tympanum, forms an integral part of a second portal surmounted by a classical-style triangular pediment. This double portal is housed beneath a huge semicircular discharging arch, which is itself topped by an oculus surrounded by the tetramorph and lodged under a pointed arch. The church facade is rich in decoration inspired by antiquity with columns surmounted by acanthus-leaf capitals. St Gabriel also boasts purely Romanesque carved decorative work, such as the tympanum on the first portal depicting Daniel in the lions’ den (on the left), and Adam and Eve next to the tree of knowledge of good and evil surrounded by the snake (on the right). On entering the chapel, the light and wealth of decoration on the portal give way to shadow and simplicity. A single rectangular nave is divided into three barrel-vaulted bays separated by twin-projecting transverse arches supported by abutments to floor-level. In Roman times the site was situated at the intersection of two major branches of the mythical route travelled by Hercules. One of these roads, the Via Domitia, followed the river Durance, crossing it at Cavaillon to the north of the Alpilles before passing through Glanum (Saint-Rémy-de-Provence) and Ernaginum. The other road, which came from the coast over the plain of La Crau, also served as the northern branch of the Via Aurelia from Aix-en-Provence, coming to an end at St Gabriel next to a large area of marshland. A third road connected Avignon and Arles. The route here was so marshy that utricularii (‘raft masters’) were needed to help people and goods across, with the result that the site became an important settlement in antiquity. The community declined, however, as the marshes gradually began to dry out.


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