Alpilles

    Romanin Castle

    Category: Tag:

    Address

    address

    Chemin Départemental 29 Route de Cavaillon

    Town

    Saint-Rémy-de-Provence

    Postal code

    13210

    Website

    http://www.romanin.com/

    Map


    Description

    This vineyard belongs to Anne-Marie and Jean-Louis Charmolüe, former owners of the Château Montrose winery with its Saint-Estèphe Second Grand Cru Classé. The Charmolües have now been devoting themselves to their passion – the Château de Romanin – since 2006. The estate covers 250 hectares, including 58 that are dedicated to vines with the ‘Les Baux-de-Provence’ appellation. The ruins of a 13th-century castle of the Knights Templar still survive on the spot. The remains, which formed a ‘court of love’ in the Middle Ages, now co-exist with a genuine architectural monument: an underground cellar, covered with soil and plants, has been constructed to ensure perfect harmony between the cultivation of the vines and the work in the cellars. This structure, which has been dug out of the rock, is designed to imitate a Gothic cathedral with columns, capitals and ribbed vaults punctuating the space in accordance with the basic measurements used by the builders of yesteryear. The wines here (60% of which are reds, 30% rosés and 10% whites) are aged in casks and barrels. Since the vineyard was established in 1988, the Château Romanin wines have been based on biodynamic methods of winegrowing, a philosophy and mindset that respects nature. The vines are treated in a novel fashion that takes into account the type of soil, the rhythms of nature and the influence of the stars. A planting calendar is used to observe the great natural cycles and to assign the treatments based on sludge compost, nettle infusions, horsetail decoctions and crushed silica. No herbicides or chemicals are used in the cultivation of the vineyard. Château Romanin’s first vintage emerged in 1990; its wines are in the image of the unique terroir and reflect the influence of the particular method of cultivation. Their strong and warm structure and aromatic minerality give expression to an earthy character; but they also have an ethereal and svelte quality thanks to their range, delicacy and freshness. Château Romanin is located in a corridor that is highly exposed to the Mistral wind, and the clay and limestone soil, which is porous and rocky, is impervious to the moisture that can be damaging to this kind of biodynamic farming. The harvest at Château Romanin is undertaken by hand, and the bunches of grapes are packed in 15 to 18 kg perforated crates so as not to damage them by squeezing them together too tightly. The grapes are then carefully hand-sorted on a collation table. The wine storehouse is equipped with a pneumatic press, 150 hl stainless steel tanks and wooden vats shaped like flattened cones. A system of electronic sensors is placed in each vat to regulate and control the fermentation temperature of the juices and to bring out their aromas to the full. As well as oak barrels and casks of all ages, there are also concrete and stainless steel vats: stainless steel to conserve the fruit, bare concrete to improve the quality of the fruitiness, and wood to coat it and round off the tannins. Blending takes place in early spring: the wines are tasted, evaluated and selected, followed by the blending of the parcel selections. The temperature remains at a natural level and the wine undergoes little or no filtration. We will finish this section of the audio recording with a poem by Ludovic Souvestre, a traditional Provençal poet or félibre from Eygalières, and a great defender of the village and its surroundings: ‘Oh Romanin, oh château of old, Temple of Truth, Temple of Beauty, though you may live only in memory, Yet you remain the symbol of a Provence in splendour. On your mass of fallen rock, château of old, the heat and the frost still pour scorn, But never tired of singing, one day in droves the poets shall come. This vineyard belongs to Anne-Marie and Jean-Louis Charmolüe, former owners of the Château Montrose winery with its Saint-Estèphe Second Grand Cru Classé. The Charmolües have now been devoting themselves to their passion – the Château de Romanin – since 2006. The estate covers 250 hectares, including 58 that are dedicated to vines with the ‘Les Baux-de-Provence’ appellation. The ruins of a 13th-century castle of the Knights Templar still survive on the spot. The remains, which formed a ‘court of love’ in the Middle Ages, now co-exist with a genuine architectural monument: an underground cellar, covered with soil and plants, has been constructed to ensure perfect harmony between the cultivation of the vines and the work in the cellars. This structure, which has been dug out of the rock, is designed to imitate a Gothic cathedral with columns, capitals and ribbed vaults punctuating the space in accordance with the basic measurements used by the builders of yesteryear. The wines here (60% of which are reds, 30% rosés and 10% whites) are aged in casks and barrels. Since the vineyard was established in 1988, the Château Romanin wines have been based on biodynamic methods of winegrowing, a philosophy and mindset that respects nature. The vines are treated in a novel fashion that takes into account the type of soil, the rhythms of nature and the influence of the stars. A planting calendar is used to observe the great natural cycles and to assign the treatments based on sludge compost, nettle infusions, horsetail decoctions and crushed silica. No herbicides or chemicals are used in the cultivation of the vineyard. Château Romanin’s first vintage emerged in 1990; its wines are in the image of the unique terroir and reflect the influence of the particular method of cultivation. Their strong and warm structure and aromatic minerality give expression to an earthy character; but they also have an ethereal and svelte quality thanks to their range, delicacy and freshness. Château Romanin is located in a corridor that is highly exposed to the Mistral wind, and the clay and limestone soil, which is porous and rocky, is impervious to the moisture that can be damaging to this kind of biodynamic farming. The harvest at Château Romanin is undertaken by hand, and the bunches of grapes are packed in 15 to 18 kg perforated crates so as not to damage them by squeezing them together too tightly. The grapes are then carefully hand-sorted on a collation table. The wine storehouse is equipped with a pneumatic press, 150 hl stainless steel tanks and wooden vats shaped like flattened cones. A system of electronic sensors is placed in each vat to regulate and control the fermentation temperature of the juices and to bring out their aromas to the full. As well as oak barrels and casks of all ages, there are also concrete and stainless steel vats: stainless steel to conserve the fruit, bare concrete to improve the quality of the fruitiness, and wood to coat it and round off the tannins. Blending takes place in early spring: the wines are tasted, evaluated and selected, followed by the blending of the parcel selections. The temperature remains at a natural level and the wine undergoes little or no filtration. We will finish this section of the audio recording with a poem by Ludovic Souvestre, a traditional Provençal poet or félibre from Eygalières, and a great defender of the village and its surroundings: ‘Oh Romanin, oh château of old, Temple of Truth, Temple of Beauty, though you may live only in memory, Yet you remain the symbol of a Provence in splendour. On your mass of fallen rock, château of old, the heat and the frost still pour scorn, But never tired of singing, one day in droves the poets shall come. This vineyard belongs to Anne-Marie and Jean-Louis Charmolüe, former owners of the Château Montrose winery with its Saint-Estèphe Second Grand Cru Classé. The Charmolües have now been devoting themselves to their passion – the Château de Romanin – since 2006. The estate covers 250 hectares, including 58 that are dedicated to vines with the ‘Les Baux-de-Provence’ appellation. The ruins of a 13th-century castle of the Knights Templar still survive on the spot. The remains, which formed a ‘court of love’ in the Middle Ages, now co-exist with a genuine architectural monument: an underground cellar, covered with soil and plants, has been constructed to ensure perfect harmony between the cultivation of the vines and the work in the cellars. This structure, which has been dug out of the rock, is designed to imitate a Gothic cathedral with columns, capitals and ribbed vaults punctuating the space in accordance with the basic measurements used by the builders of yesteryear. The wines here (60% of which are reds, 30% rosés and 10% whites) are aged in casks and barrels. Since the vineyard was established in 1988, the Château Romanin wines have been based on biodynamic methods of winegrowing, a philosophy and mindset that respects nature. The vines are treated in a novel fashion that takes into account the type of soil, the rhythms of nature and the influence of the stars. A planting calendar is used to observe the great natural cycles and to assign the treatments based on sludge compost, nettle infusions, horsetail decoctions and crushed silica. No herbicides or chemicals are used in the cultivation of the vineyard. Château Romanin’s first vintage emerged in 1990; its wines are in the image of the unique terroir and reflect the influence of the particular method of cultivation. Their strong and warm structure and aromatic minerality give expression to an earthy character; but they also have an ethereal and svelte quality thanks to their range, delicacy and freshness. Château Romanin is located in a corridor that is highly exposed to the Mistral wind, and the clay and limestone soil, which is porous and rocky, is impervious to the moisture that can be damaging to this kind of biodynamic farming. The harvest at Château Romanin is undertaken by hand, and the bunches of grapes are packed in 15 to 18 kg perforated crates so as not to damage them by squeezing them together too tightly. The grapes are then carefully hand-sorted on a collation table. The wine storehouse is equipped with a pneumatic press, 150 hl stainless steel tanks and wooden vats shaped like flattened cones. A system of electronic sensors is placed in each vat to regulate and control the fermentation temperature of the juices and to bring out their aromas to the full. As well as oak barrels and casks of all ages, there are also concrete and stainless steel vats: stainless steel to conserve the fruit, bare concrete to improve the quality of the fruitiness, and wood to coat it and round off the tannins. Blending takes place in early spring: the wines are tasted, evaluated and selected, followed by the blending of the parcel selections. The temperature remains at a natural level and the wine undergoes little or no filtration. We will finish this section of the audio recording with a poem by Ludovic Souvestre, a traditional Provençal poet or félibre from Eygalières, and a great defender of the village and its surroundings: ‘Oh Romanin, oh château of old, Temple of Truth, Temple of Beauty, though you may live only in memory, Yet you remain the symbol of a Provence in splendour. On your mass of fallen rock, château of old, the heat and the frost still pour scorn, But never tired of singing, one day in droves the poets shall come. This vineyard belongs to Anne-Marie and Jean-Louis Charmolüe, former owners of the Château Montrose winery with its Saint-Estèphe Second Grand Cru Classé. The Charmolües have now been devoting themselves to their passion – the Château de Romanin – since 2006. The estate covers 250 hectares, including 58 that are dedicated to vines with the ‘Les Baux-de-Provence’ appellation. The ruins of a 13th-century castle of the Knights Templar still survive on the spot. The remains, which formed a ‘court of love’ in the Middle Ages, now co-exist with a genuine architectural monument: an underground cellar, covered with soil and plants, has been constructed to ensure perfect harmony between the cultivation of the vines and the work in the cellars. This structure, which has been dug out of the rock, is designed to imitate a Gothic cathedral with columns, capitals and ribbed vaults punctuating the space in accordance with the basic measurements used by the builders of yesteryear. The wines here (60% of which are reds, 30% rosés and 10% whites) are aged in casks and barrels. Since the vineyard was established in 1988, the Château Romanin wines have been based on biodynamic methods of winegrowing, a philosophy and mindset that respects nature. The vines are treated in a novel fashion that takes into account the type of soil, the rhythms of nature and the influence of the stars. A planting calendar is used to observe the great natural cycles and to assign the treatments based on sludge compost, nettle infusions, horsetail decoctions and crushed silica. No herbicides or chemicals are used in the cultivation of the vineyard. Château Romanin’s first vintage emerged in 1990; its wines are in the image of the unique terroir and reflect the influence of the particular method of cultivation. Their strong and warm structure and aromatic minerality give expression to an earthy character; but they also have an ethereal and svelte quality thanks to their range, delicacy and freshness. Château Romanin is located in a corridor that is highly exposed to the Mistral wind, and the clay and limestone soil, which is porous and rocky, is impervious to the moisture that can be damaging to this kind of biodynamic farming. The harvest at Château Romanin is undertaken by hand, and the bunches of grapes are packed in 15 to 18 kg perforated crates so as not to damage them by squeezing them together too tightly. The grapes are then carefully hand-sorted on a collation table. The wine storehouse is equipped with a pneumatic press, 150 hl stainless steel tanks and wooden vats shaped like flattened cones. A system of electronic sensors is placed in each vat to regulate and control the fermentation temperature of the juices and to bring out their aromas to the full. As well as oak barrels and casks of all ages, there are also concrete and stainless steel vats: stainless steel to conserve the fruit, bare concrete to improve the quality of the fruitiness, and wood to coat it and round off the tannins. Blending takes place in early spring: the wines are tasted, evaluated and selected, followed by the blending of the parcel selections. The temperature remains at a natural level and the wine undergoes little or no filtration. We will finish this section of the audio recording with a poem by Ludovic Souvestre, a traditional Provençal poet or félibre from Eygalières, and a great defender of the village and its surroundings: ‘Oh Romanin, oh château of old, Temple of Truth, Temple of Beauty, though you may live only in memory, Yet you remain the symbol of a Provence in splendour. On your mass of fallen rock, château of old, the heat and the frost still pour scorn, But never tired of singing, one day in droves the poets shall come. This vineyard belongs to Anne-Marie and Jean-Louis Charmolüe, former owners of the Château Montrose winery with its Saint-Estèphe Second Grand Cru Classé. The Charmolües have now been devoting themselves to their passion – the Château de Romanin – since 2006. The estate covers 250 hectares, including 58 that are dedicated to vines with the ‘Les Baux-de-Provence’ appellation. The ruins of a 13th-century castle of the Knights Templar still survive on the spot. The remains, which formed a ‘court of love’ in the Middle Ages, now co-exist with a genuine architectural monument: an underground cellar, covered with soil and plants, has been constructed to ensure perfect harmony between the cultivation of the vines and the work in the cellars. This structure, which has been dug out of the rock, is designed to imitate a Gothic cathedral with columns, capitals and ribbed vaults punctuating the space in accordance with the basic measurements used by the builders of yesteryear. The wines here (60% of which are reds, 30% rosés and 10% whites) are aged in casks and barrels. Since the vineyard was established in 1988, the Château Romanin wines have been based on biodynamic methods of winegrowing, a philosophy and mindset that respects nature. The vines are treated in a novel fashion that takes into account the type of soil, the rhythms of nature and the influence of the stars. A planting calendar is used to observe the great natural cycles and to assign the treatments based on sludge compost, nettle infusions, horsetail decoctions and crushed silica. No herbicides or chemicals are used in the cultivation of the vineyard. Château Romanin’s first vintage emerged in 1990; its wines are in the image of the unique terroir and reflect the influence of the particular method of cultivation. Their strong and warm structure and aromatic minerality give expression to an earthy character; but they also have an ethereal and svelte quality thanks to their range, delicacy and freshness. Château Romanin is located in a corridor that is highly exposed to the Mistral wind, and the clay and limestone soil, which is porous and rocky, is impervious to the moisture that can be damaging to this kind of biodynamic farming. The harvest at Château Romanin is undertaken by hand, and the bunches of grapes are packed in 15 to 18 kg perforated crates so as not to damage them by squeezing them together too tightly. The grapes are then carefully hand-sorted on a collation table. The wine storehouse is equipped with a pneumatic press, 150 hl stainless steel tanks and wooden vats shaped like flattened cones. A system of electronic sensors is placed in each vat to regulate and control the fermentation temperature of the juices and to bring out their aromas to the full. As well as oak barrels and casks of all ages, there are also concrete and stainless steel vats: stainless steel to conserve the fruit, bare concrete to improve the quality of the fruitiness, and wood to coat it and round off the tannins. Blending takes place in early spring: the wines are tasted, evaluated and selected, followed by the blending of the parcel selections. The temperature remains at a natural level and the wine undergoes little or no filtration. We will finish this section of the audio recording with a poem by Ludovic Souvestre, a traditional Provençal poet or félibre from Eygalières, and a great defender of the village and its surroundings: ‘Oh Romanin, oh château of old, Temple of Truth, Temple of Beauty, though you may live only in memory, Yet you remain the symbol of a Provence in splendour. On your mass of fallen rock, château of old, the heat and the frost still pour scorn, But never tired of singing, one day in droves the poets shall come. This vineyard belongs to Anne-Marie and Jean-Louis Charmolüe, former owners of the Château Montrose winery with its Saint-Estèphe Second Grand Cru Classé. The Charmolües have now been devoting themselves to their passion – the Château de Romanin – since 2006. The estate covers 250 hectares, including 58 that are dedicated to vines with the ‘Les Baux-de-Provence’ appellation. The ruins of a 13th-century castle of the Knights Templar still survive on the spot. The remains, which formed a ‘court of love’ in the Middle Ages, now co-exist with a genuine architectural monument: an underground cellar, covered with soil and plants, has been constructed to ensure perfect harmony between the cultivation of the vines and the work in the cellars. This structure, which has been dug out of the rock, is designed to imitate a Gothic cathedral with columns, capitals and ribbed vaults punctuating the space in accordance with the basic measurements used by the builders of yesteryear. The wines here (60% of which are reds, 30% rosés and 10% whites) are aged in casks and barrels. Since the vineyard was established in 1988, the Château Romanin wines have been based on biodynamic methods of winegrowing, a philosophy and mindset that respects nature. The vines are treated in a novel fashion that takes into account the type of soil, the rhythms of nature and the influence of the stars. A planting calendar is used to observe the great natural cycles and to assign the treatments based on sludge compost, nettle infusions, horsetail decoctions and crushed silica. No herbicides or chemicals are used in the cultivation of the vineyard. Château Romanin’s first vintage emerged in 1990; its wines are in the image of the unique terroir and reflect the influence of the particular method of cultivation. Their strong and warm structure and aromatic minerality give expression to an earthy character; but they also have an ethereal and svelte quality thanks to their range, delicacy and freshness. Château Romanin is located in a corridor that is highly exposed to the Mistral wind, and the clay and limestone soil, which is porous and rocky, is impervious to the moisture that can be damaging to this kind of biodynamic farming. The harvest at Château Romanin is undertaken by hand, and the bunches of grapes are packed in 15 to 18 kg perforated crates so as not to damage them by squeezing them together too tightly. The grapes are then carefully hand-sorted on a collation table. The wine storehouse is equipped with a pneumatic press, 150 hl stainless steel tanks and wooden vats shaped like flattened cones. A system of electronic sensors is placed in each vat to regulate and control the fermentation temperature of the juices and to bring out their aromas to the full. As well as oak barrels and casks of all ages, there are also concrete and stainless steel vats: stainless steel to conserve the fruit, bare concrete to improve the quality of the fruitiness, and wood to coat it and round off the tannins. Blending takes place in early spring: the wines are tasted, evaluated and selected, followed by the blending of the parcel selections. The temperature remains at a natural level and the wine undergoes little or no filtration. We will finish this section of the audio recording with a poem by Ludovic Souvestre, a traditional Provençal poet or félibre from Eygalières, and a great defender of the village and its surroundings: ‘Oh Romanin, oh château of old, Temple of Truth, Temple of Beauty, though you may live only in memory, Yet you remain the symbol of a Provence in splendour. On your mass of fallen rock, château of old, the heat and the frost still pour scorn, But never tired of singing, one day in droves the poets shall come. This vineyard belongs to Anne-Marie and Jean-Louis Charmolüe, former owners of the Château Montrose winery with its Saint-Estèphe Second Grand Cru Classé. The Charmolües have now been devoting themselves to their passion – the Château de Romanin – since 2006. The estate covers 250 hectares, including 58 that are dedicated to vines with the ‘Les Baux-de-Provence’ appellation. The ruins of a 13th-century castle of the Knights Templar still survive on the spot. The remains, which formed a ‘court of love’ in the Middle Ages, now co-exist with a genuine architectural monument: an underground cellar, covered with soil and plants, has been constructed to ensure perfect harmony between the cultivation of the vines and the work in the cellars. This structure, which has been dug out of the rock, is designed to imitate a Gothic cathedral with columns, capitals and ribbed vaults punctuating the space in accordance with the basic measurements used by the builders of yesteryear. The wines here (60% of which are reds, 30% rosés and 10% whites) are aged in casks and barrels. Since the vineyard was established in 1988, the Château Romanin wines have been based on biodynamic methods of winegrowing, a philosophy and mindset that respects nature. The vines are treated in a novel fashion that takes into account the type of soil, the rhythms of nature and the influence of the stars. A planting calendar is used to observe the great natural cycles and to assign the treatments based on sludge compost, nettle infusions, horsetail decoctions and crushed silica. No herbicides or chemicals are used in the cultivation of the vineyard. Château Romanin’s first vintage emerged in 1990; its wines are in the image of the unique terroir and reflect the influence of the particular method of cultivation. Their strong and warm structure and aromatic minerality give expression to an earthy character; but they also have an ethereal and svelte quality thanks to their range, delicacy and freshness. Château Romanin is located in a corridor that is highly exposed to the Mistral wind, and the clay and limestone soil, which is porous and rocky, is impervious to the moisture that can be damaging to this kind of biodynamic farming. The harvest at Château Romanin is undertaken by hand, and the bunches of grapes are packed in 15 to 18 kg perforated crates so as not to damage them by squeezing them together too tightly. The grapes are then carefully hand-sorted on a collation table. The wine storehouse is equipped with a pneumatic press, 150 hl stainless steel tanks and wooden vats shaped like flattened cones. A system of electronic sensors is placed in each vat to regulate and control the fermentation temperature of the juices and to bring out their aromas to the full. As well as oak barrels and casks of all ages, there are also concrete and stainless steel vats: stainless steel to conserve the fruit, bare concrete to improve the quality of the fruitiness, and wood to coat it and round off the tannins. Blending takes place in early spring: the wines are tasted, evaluated and selected, followed by the blending of the parcel selections. The temperature remains at a natural level and the wine undergoes little or no filtration. We will finish this section of the audio recording with a poem by Ludovic Souvestre, a traditional Provençal poet or félibre from Eygalières, and a great defender of the village and its surroundings: ‘Oh Romanin, oh château of old, Temple of Truth, Temple of Beauty, though you may live only in memory, Yet you remain the symbol of a Provence in splendour. On your mass of fallen rock, château of old, the heat and the frost still pour scorn, But never tired of singing, one day in droves the poets shall come. This vineyard belongs to Anne-Marie and Jean-Louis Charmolüe, former owners of the Château Montrose winery with its Saint-Estèphe Second Grand Cru Classé. The Charmolües have now been devoting themselves to their passion – the Château de Romanin – since 2006. The estate covers 250 hectares, including 58 that are dedicated to vines with the ‘Les Baux-de-Provence’ appellation. The ruins of a 13th-century castle of the Knights Templar still survive on the spot. The remains, which formed a ‘court of love’ in the Middle Ages, now co-exist with a genuine architectural monument: an underground cellar, covered with soil and plants, has been constructed to ensure perfect harmony between the cultivation of the vines and the work in the cellars. This structure, which has been dug out of the rock, is designed to imitate a Gothic cathedral with columns, capitals and ribbed vaults punctuating the space in accordance with the basic measurements used by the builders of yesteryear. The wines here (60% of which are reds, 30% rosés and 10% whites) are aged in casks and barrels. Since the vineyard was established in 1988, the Château Romanin wines have been based on biodynamic methods of winegrowing, a philosophy and mindset that respects nature. The vines are treated in a novel fashion that takes into account the type of soil, the rhythms of nature and the influence of the stars. A planting calendar is used to observe the great natural cycles and to assign the treatments based on sludge compost, nettle infusions, horsetail decoctions and crushed silica. No herbicides or chemicals are used in the cultivation of the vineyard. Château Romanin’s first vintage emerged in 1990; its wines are in the image of the unique terroir and reflect the influence of the particular method of cultivation. Their strong and warm structure and aromatic minerality give expression to an earthy character; but they also have an ethereal and svelte quality thanks to their range, delicacy and freshness. Château Romanin is located in a corridor that is highly exposed to the Mistral wind, and the clay and limestone soil, which is porous and rocky, is impervious to the moisture that can be damaging to this kind of biodynamic farming. The harvest at Château Romanin is undertaken by hand, and the bunches of grapes are packed in 15 to 18 kg perforated crates so as not to damage them by squeezing them together too tightly. The grapes are then carefully hand-sorted on a collation table. The wine storehouse is equipped with a pneumatic press, 150 hl stainless steel tanks and wooden vats shaped like flattened cones. A system of electronic sensors is placed in each vat to regulate and control the fermentation temperature of the juices and to bring out their aromas to the full. As well as oak barrels and casks of all ages, there are also concrete and stainless steel vats: stainless steel to conserve the fruit, bare concrete to improve the quality of the fruitiness, and wood to coat it and round off the tannins. Blending takes place in early spring: the wines are tasted, evaluated and selected, followed by the blending of the parcel selections. The temperature remains at a natural level and the wine undergoes little or no filtration. We will finish this section of the audio recording with a poem by Ludovic Souvestre, a traditional Provençal poet or félibre from Eygalières, and a great defender of the village and its surroundings: ‘Oh Romanin, oh château of old, Temple of Truth, Temple of Beauty, though you may live only in memory, Yet you remain the symbol of a Provence in splendour. On your mass of fallen rock, château of old, the heat and the frost still pour scorn, But never tired of singing, one day in droves the poets shall come.


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