Arles

    Roman Aqueduc of Barbegal

    Category: Tag:

    Address

    address

    Route de l'Acqueduc

    Town

    Fontvieille

    Postal code

    13990

    Map


    Description

    The aqueduct and the Barbegal mills form a Roman hydraulic mill complex located in Fontvieille, near the town of Arles. This complex has been called ‘the largest known concentration of mechanical power in the ancient world’. Part of the aqueduct was classified as a national historic monument on 12 July 1886, and other parts were classified as regional historic monuments on 5 February1937. The Les Arcs Valley, in the commune of Fontvieille, approximately seven kilometres east of Arles, is crossed by two parallel, partly arched aqueduct bridges. This system can be explained by the modifications made to the Arles aqueduct in the early 2nd century. The original structure consisted of two branches which converged into a pond, from where a single conduit supplied Arles. Its eastern branch was diverted to supply the Barbegal mill, while the western branch continued to supply the town of Arles. The newly constructed bridge crossed the secondary Pène range to supply the mill. The water worked two series of eight vertical paddle wheels on either side of a central alley; these wheels supplied energy to the flour mills. The aqueduct and the Barbegal mills were built to supply the town of Arles. The mill could produce 4.5 tonnes of flour a day, enough to feed the 12,500 inhabitants of Arles at the time. Excavations of its eastern drainage channel and the upstream pond of the Les Arcs Valley have revealed that this complex was built in the early 2nd century and operated until the early 3rd century. The aqueduct and the Barbegal mills form a Roman hydraulic mill complex located in Fontvieille, near the town of Arles. This complex has been called ‘the largest known concentration of mechanical power in the ancient world’. Part of the aqueduct was classified as a national historic monument on 12 July 1886, and other parts were classified as regional historic monuments on 5 February1937. The Les Arcs Valley, in the commune of Fontvieille, approximately seven kilometres east of Arles, is crossed by two parallel, partly arched aqueduct bridges. This system can be explained by the modifications made to the Arles aqueduct in the early 2nd century. The original structure consisted of two branches which converged into a pond, from where a single conduit supplied Arles. Its eastern branch was diverted to supply the Barbegal mill, while the western branch continued to supply the town of Arles. The newly constructed bridge crossed the secondary Pène range to supply the mill. The water worked two series of eight vertical paddle wheels on either side of a central alley; these wheels supplied energy to the flour mills. The aqueduct and the Barbegal mills were built to supply the town of Arles. The mill could produce 4.5 tonnes of flour a day, enough to feed the 12,500 inhabitants of Arles at the time. Excavations of its eastern drainage channel and the upstream pond of the Les Arcs Valley have revealed that this complex was built in the early 2nd century and operated until the early 3rd century. The aqueduct and the Barbegal mills form a Roman hydraulic mill complex located in Fontvieille, near the town of Arles. This complex has been called ‘the largest known concentration of mechanical power in the ancient world’. Part of the aqueduct was classified as a national historic monument on 12 July 1886, and other parts were classified as regional historic monuments on 5 February1937. The Les Arcs Valley, in the commune of Fontvieille, approximately seven kilometres east of Arles, is crossed by two parallel, partly arched aqueduct bridges. This system can be explained by the modifications made to the Arles aqueduct in the early 2nd century. The original structure consisted of two branches which converged into a pond, from where a single conduit supplied Arles. Its eastern branch was diverted to supply the Barbegal mill, while the western branch continued to supply the town of Arles. The newly constructed bridge crossed the secondary Pène range to supply the mill. The water worked two series of eight vertical paddle wheels on either side of a central alley; these wheels supplied energy to the flour mills. The aqueduct and the Barbegal mills were built to supply the town of Arles. The mill could produce 4.5 tonnes of flour a day, enough to feed the 12,500 inhabitants of Arles at the time. Excavations of its eastern drainage channel and the upstream pond of the Les Arcs Valley have revealed that this complex was built in the early 2nd century and operated until the early 3rd century. The aqueduct and the Barbegal mills form a Roman hydraulic mill complex located in Fontvieille, near the town of Arles. This complex has been called ‘the largest known concentration of mechanical power in the ancient world’. Part of the aqueduct was classified as a national historic monument on 12 July 1886, and other parts were classified as regional historic monuments on 5 February1937. The Les Arcs Valley, in the commune of Fontvieille, approximately seven kilometres east of Arles, is crossed by two parallel, partly arched aqueduct bridges. This system can be explained by the modifications made to the Arles aqueduct in the early 2nd century. The original structure consisted of two branches which converged into a pond, from where a single conduit supplied Arles. Its eastern branch was diverted to supply the Barbegal mill, while the western branch continued to supply the town of Arles. The newly constructed bridge crossed the secondary Pène range to supply the mill. The water worked two series of eight vertical paddle wheels on either side of a central alley; these wheels supplied energy to the flour mills. The aqueduct and the Barbegal mills were built to supply the town of Arles. The mill could produce 4.5 tonnes of flour a day, enough to feed the 12,500 inhabitants of Arles at the time. Excavations of its eastern drainage channel and the upstream pond of the Les Arcs Valley have revealed that this complex was built in the early 2nd century and operated until the early 3rd century. The aqueduct and the Barbegal mills form a Roman hydraulic mill complex located in Fontvieille, near the town of Arles. This complex has been called ‘the largest known concentration of mechanical power in the ancient world’. Part of the aqueduct was classified as a national historic monument on 12 July 1886, and other parts were classified as regional historic monuments on 5 February1937. The Les Arcs Valley, in the commune of Fontvieille, approximately seven kilometres east of Arles, is crossed by two parallel, partly arched aqueduct bridges. This system can be explained by the modifications made to the Arles aqueduct in the early 2nd century. The original structure consisted of two branches which converged into a pond, from where a single conduit supplied Arles. Its eastern branch was diverted to supply the Barbegal mill, while the western branch continued to supply the town of Arles. The newly constructed bridge crossed the secondary Pène range to supply the mill. The water worked two series of eight vertical paddle wheels on either side of a central alley; these wheels supplied energy to the flour mills. The aqueduct and the Barbegal mills were built to supply the town of Arles. The mill could produce 4.5 tonnes of flour a day, enough to feed the 12,500 inhabitants of Arles at the time. Excavations of its eastern drainage channel and the upstream pond of the Les Arcs Valley have revealed that this complex was built in the early 2nd century and operated until the early 3rd century. The aqueduct and the Barbegal mills form a Roman hydraulic mill complex located in Fontvieille, near the town of Arles. This complex has been called ‘the largest known concentration of mechanical power in the ancient world’. Part of the aqueduct was classified as a national historic monument on 12 July 1886, and other parts were classified as regional historic monuments on 5 February1937. The Les Arcs Valley, in the commune of Fontvieille, approximately seven kilometres east of Arles, is crossed by two parallel, partly arched aqueduct bridges. This system can be explained by the modifications made to the Arles aqueduct in the early 2nd century. The original structure consisted of two branches which converged into a pond, from where a single conduit supplied Arles. Its eastern branch was diverted to supply the Barbegal mill, while the western branch continued to supply the town of Arles. The newly constructed bridge crossed the secondary Pène range to supply the mill. The water worked two series of eight vertical paddle wheels on either side of a central alley; these wheels supplied energy to the flour mills. The aqueduct and the Barbegal mills were built to supply the town of Arles. The mill could produce 4.5 tonnes of flour a day, enough to feed the 12,500 inhabitants of Arles at the time. Excavations of its eastern drainage channel and the upstream pond of the Les Arcs Valley have revealed that this complex was built in the early 2nd century and operated until the early 3rd century. The aqueduct and the Barbegal mills form a Roman hydraulic mill complex located in Fontvieille, near the town of Arles. This complex has been called ‘the largest known concentration of mechanical power in the ancient world’. Part of the aqueduct was classified as a national historic monument on 12 July 1886, and other parts were classified as regional historic monuments on 5 February1937. The Les Arcs Valley, in the commune of Fontvieille, approximately seven kilometres east of Arles, is crossed by two parallel, partly arched aqueduct bridges. This system can be explained by the modifications made to the Arles aqueduct in the early 2nd century. The original structure consisted of two branches which converged into a pond, from where a single conduit supplied Arles. Its eastern branch was diverted to supply the Barbegal mill, while the western branch continued to supply the town of Arles. The newly constructed bridge crossed the secondary Pène range to supply the mill. The water worked two series of eight vertical paddle wheels on either side of a central alley; these wheels supplied energy to the flour mills. The aqueduct and the Barbegal mills were built to supply the town of Arles. The mill could produce 4.5 tonnes of flour a day, enough to feed the 12,500 inhabitants of Arles at the time. Excavations of its eastern drainage channel and the upstream pond of the Les Arcs Valley have revealed that this complex was built in the early 2nd century and operated until the early 3rd century. The aqueduct and the Barbegal mills form a Roman hydraulic mill complex located in Fontvieille, near the town of Arles. This complex has been called ‘the largest known concentration of mechanical power in the ancient world’. Part of the aqueduct was classified as a national historic monument on 12 July 1886, and other parts were classified as regional historic monuments on 5 February1937. The Les Arcs Valley, in the commune of Fontvieille, approximately seven kilometres east of Arles, is crossed by two parallel, partly arched aqueduct bridges. This system can be explained by the modifications made to the Arles aqueduct in the early 2nd century. The original structure consisted of two branches which converged into a pond, from where a single conduit supplied Arles. Its eastern branch was diverted to supply the Barbegal mill, while the western branch continued to supply the town of Arles. The newly constructed bridge crossed the secondary Pène range to supply the mill. The water worked two series of eight vertical paddle wheels on either side of a central alley; these wheels supplied energy to the flour mills. The aqueduct and the Barbegal mills were built to supply the town of Arles. The mill could produce 4.5 tonnes of flour a day, enough to feed the 12,500 inhabitants of Arles at the time. Excavations of its eastern drainage channel and the upstream pond of the Les Arcs Valley have revealed that this complex was built in the early 2nd century and operated until the early 3rd century.


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