Avignon

    Petit Palais Museum

    €6,00

    Category: Tags: ,

    Address

    address

    Palais des archevêques, Place du Palais

    Town

    Avignon

    Postal code

    84000

    Phone

    04 90 86 44 58

    Website

    http://www.petit-palais.org/

    Map


    Description

    The enormous and imposing outline of the Petit Palais (the ‘Small Palace’) completes the Place du Palais (‘Palace Square’) to the north. This beautiful building emerged during the second decade of the 14th century; it was given the name Petit Palais to distinguish it from its powerful neighbour, the Palais des Papes. The building is a reminder of the 25 palaces constructed in the town by the cardinals. These grand mansions built by the cardinals are known as Livrées Cardinalices. Cardinal Bérenger Fredol the Old, the grand penitentiary of Pope Clement V, constructed a vast mansion around 1318, a two-tiered palace flanked by a huge tower. On his death in 1323, Cardinal Arnaud de Via (nephew of the sitting Pope John XXII) bought it on his own account and extended the building constructed on the side of the Rocher des Doms. Pope Benedict XII purchased the property in 1335 and transferred the episcopal seat there. A major campaign of work gave the palace interior a layout that is similar to its current appearance. The Petit Palais was almost exclusively the Livrée of the cardinals and bishops of Avignon, although Pierre d’Aigrefeuille resided in the palace during his episcopate even though he had not been named as a cardinal. During the first siege of the Palais des Papes (1398-1408), the building was used as a barracks for troops under the command of Geoffroy le Meingre; during the second siege (1410-1411), it was attached to the palace’s defence system by Rodrigue de Luna. The palace was damaged but was restored on the orders of Cardinal Alain de Coëtivy from 1457 onwards. It was the cardinal’s successor, Julien de la Rovère (the future Pope Julius II) who gave it its present appearance. De la Rovère’s successor, the legate Giuliano della Rovere (nephew of Pope Sixtus IV) made numerous changes and converted it into the palace of the archbishops. In 1498, the cardinal received Cesare Borgia, son of Pope Alexander VI, in splendour at the palace. François I, whilst on a visit to the tomb of Laure, was hosted there by Cardinal Ippolito de’ Medici in 1535. The palace was ‘nationalised’ during the Revolution and subsequently had a variety of uses. The Petit Palais has been a museum since 1976, housing masterpieces of painting from the Middle Ages and Renaissance, including the 300 primitive pictures in the Campana collection. The enormous and imposing outline of the Petit Palais (the ‘Small Palace’) completes the Place du Palais (‘Palace Square’) to the north. This beautiful building emerged during the second decade of the 14th century; it was given the name Petit Palais to distinguish it from its powerful neighbour, the Palais des Papes. The building is a reminder of the 25 palaces constructed in the town by the cardinals. These grand mansions built by the cardinals are known as Livrées Cardinalices. Cardinal Bérenger Fredol the Old, the grand penitentiary of Pope Clement V, constructed a vast mansion around 1318, a two-tiered palace flanked by a huge tower. On his death in 1323, Cardinal Arnaud de Via (nephew of the sitting Pope John XXII) bought it on his own account and extended the building constructed on the side of the Rocher des Doms. Pope Benedict XII purchased the property in 1335 and transferred the episcopal seat there. A major campaign of work gave the palace interior a layout that is similar to its current appearance. The Petit Palais was almost exclusively the Livrée of the cardinals and bishops of Avignon, although Pierre d’Aigrefeuille resided in the palace during his episcopate even though he had not been named as a cardinal. During the first siege of the Palais des Papes (1398-1408), the building was used as a barracks for troops under the command of Geoffroy le Meingre; during the second siege (1410-1411), it was attached to the palace’s defence system by Rodrigue de Luna. The palace was damaged but was restored on the orders of Cardinal Alain de Coëtivy from 1457 onwards. It was the cardinal’s successor, Julien de la Rovère (the future Pope Julius II) who gave it its present appearance. De la Rovère’s successor, the legate Giuliano della Rovere (nephew of Pope Sixtus IV) made numerous changes and converted it into the palace of the archbishops. In 1498, the cardinal received Cesare Borgia, son of Pope Alexander VI, in splendour at the palace. François I, whilst on a visit to the tomb of Laure, was hosted there by Cardinal Ippolito de’ Medici in 1535. The palace was ‘nationalised’ during the Revolution and subsequently had a variety of uses. The Petit Palais has been a museum since 1976, housing masterpieces of painting from the Middle Ages and Renaissance, including the 300 primitive pictures in the Campana collection.


    Practical Information

    Full price (in €)

    6,00

    Price conditions

    Full price : 6 € / Reduced price: 3 €

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