Alpilles

    Nostradamus

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    NOSTRADAMUS (1503-1566) Michel de Nostredame was born in Saint-Rémy de Provence on 14 December 1503. He grew up surrounded by science and humanism. After a youth devoted to scholarship in Saint Rémy, he studied in Avignon, then at the Faculty of Medicine in Montpellier, where he was nicknamed ‘Nostradamus’ (Latin: ‘we give our own’). This great Renaissance doctor, scholar and humanist, with an interest in geographic and scientific discoveries and new ideas, was passionate about studying the Greek, Latin, Egyptian and Aramean philosophers. After fighting the plague in Marseille and Aix, meeting Erasmus and Scaliger and taking an interest in a number of scientific theories, he became counsellor and astrologer to Catherine de Medici. In 1547, he settled and started a family in Salon de Crau, where he lived until his death. He is best known for the predictions he made during his lifetime and for his ‘Centuries’, mysterious prophecies which still arouse curiosity today. Almost nothing remains of his house of birth, originally surmounted by a tower, apart from a mullioned window. A bust of Nostradamus, created in 1859 by the sculptor Antoine Liotard de Lambrescorne, and a fountain (Fontaine Nostradamus) can be found on Rue Carnot in the old centre of Saint Rémy. NOSTRADAMUS (1503-1566) Michel de Nostredame was born in Saint-Rémy de Provence on 14 December 1503. He grew up surrounded by science and humanism. After a youth devoted to scholarship in Saint Rémy, he studied in Avignon, then at the Faculty of Medicine in Montpellier, where he was nicknamed ‘Nostradamus’ (Latin: ‘we give our own’). This great Renaissance doctor, scholar and humanist, with an interest in geographic and scientific discoveries and new ideas, was passionate about studying the Greek, Latin, Egyptian and Aramean philosophers. After fighting the plague in Marseille and Aix, meeting Erasmus and Scaliger and taking an interest in a number of scientific theories, he became counsellor and astrologer to Catherine de Medici. In 1547, he settled and started a family in Salon de Crau, where he lived until his death. He is best known for the predictions he made during his lifetime and for his ‘Centuries’, mysterious prophecies which still arouse curiosity today. Almost nothing remains of his house of birth, originally surmounted by a tower, apart from a mullioned window. A bust of Nostradamus, created in 1859 by the sculptor Antoine Liotard de Lambrescorne, and a fountain (Fontaine Nostradamus) can be found on Rue Carnot in the old centre of Saint Rémy. NOSTRADAMUS (1503-1566) Michel de Nostredame was born in Saint-Rémy de Provence on 14 December 1503. He grew up surrounded by science and humanism. After a youth devoted to scholarship in Saint Rémy, he studied in Avignon, then at the Faculty of Medicine in Montpellier, where he was nicknamed ‘Nostradamus’ (Latin: ‘we give our own’). This great Renaissance doctor, scholar and humanist, with an interest in geographic and scientific discoveries and new ideas, was passionate about studying the Greek, Latin, Egyptian and Aramean philosophers. After fighting the plague in Marseille and Aix, meeting Erasmus and Scaliger and taking an interest in a number of scientific theories, he became counsellor and astrologer to Catherine de Medici. In 1547, he settled and started a family in Salon de Crau, where he lived until his death. He is best known for the predictions he made during his lifetime and for his ‘Centuries’, mysterious prophecies which still arouse curiosity today. Almost nothing remains of his house of birth, originally surmounted by a tower, apart from a mullioned window. A bust of Nostradamus, created in 1859 by the sculptor Antoine Liotard de Lambrescorne, and a fountain (Fontaine Nostradamus) can be found on Rue Carnot in the old centre of Saint Rémy. NOSTRADAMUS (1503-1566) Michel de Nostredame was born in Saint-Rémy de Provence on 14 December 1503. He grew up surrounded by science and humanism. After a youth devoted to scholarship in Saint Rémy, he studied in Avignon, then at the Faculty of Medicine in Montpellier, where he was nicknamed ‘Nostradamus’ (Latin: ‘we give our own’). This great Renaissance doctor, scholar and humanist, with an interest in geographic and scientific discoveries and new ideas, was passionate about studying the Greek, Latin, Egyptian and Aramean philosophers. After fighting the plague in Marseille and Aix, meeting Erasmus and Scaliger and taking an interest in a number of scientific theories, he became counsellor and astrologer to Catherine de Medici. In 1547, he settled and started a family in Salon de Crau, where he lived until his death. He is best known for the predictions he made during his lifetime and for his ‘Centuries’, mysterious prophecies which still arouse curiosity today. Almost nothing remains of his house of birth, originally surmounted by a tower, apart from a mullioned window. A bust of Nostradamus, created in 1859 by the sculptor Antoine Liotard de Lambrescorne, and a fountain (Fontaine Nostradamus) can be found on Rue Carnot in the old centre of Saint Rémy. NOSTRADAMUS (1503-1566) Michel de Nostredame was born in Saint-Rémy de Provence on 14 December 1503. He grew up surrounded by science and humanism. After a youth devoted to scholarship in Saint Rémy, he studied in Avignon, then at the Faculty of Medicine in Montpellier, where he was nicknamed ‘Nostradamus’ (Latin: ‘we give our own’). This great Renaissance doctor, scholar and humanist, with an interest in geographic and scientific discoveries and new ideas, was passionate about studying the Greek, Latin, Egyptian and Aramean philosophers. After fighting the plague in Marseille and Aix, meeting Erasmus and Scaliger and taking an interest in a number of scientific theories, he became counsellor and astrologer to Catherine de Medici. In 1547, he settled and started a family in Salon de Crau, where he lived until his death. He is best known for the predictions he made during his lifetime and for his ‘Centuries’, mysterious prophecies which still arouse curiosity today. Almost nothing remains of his house of birth, originally surmounted by a tower, apart from a mullioned window. A bust of Nostradamus, created in 1859 by the sculptor Antoine Liotard de Lambrescorne, and a fountain (Fontaine Nostradamus) can be found on Rue Carnot in the old centre of Saint Rémy. NOSTRADAMUS (1503-1566) Michel de Nostredame was born in Saint-Rémy de Provence on 14 December 1503. He grew up surrounded by science and humanism. After a youth devoted to scholarship in Saint Rémy, he studied in Avignon, then at the Faculty of Medicine in Montpellier, where he was nicknamed ‘Nostradamus’ (Latin: ‘we give our own’). This great Renaissance doctor, scholar and humanist, with an interest in geographic and scientific discoveries and new ideas, was passionate about studying the Greek, Latin, Egyptian and Aramean philosophers. After fighting the plague in Marseille and Aix, meeting Erasmus and Scaliger and taking an interest in a number of scientific theories, he became counsellor and astrologer to Catherine de Medici. In 1547, he settled and started a family in Salon de Crau, where he lived until his death. He is best known for the predictions he made during his lifetime and for his ‘Centuries’, mysterious prophecies which still arouse curiosity today. Almost nothing remains of his house of birth, originally surmounted by a tower, apart from a mullioned window. A bust of Nostradamus, created in 1859 by the sculptor Antoine Liotard de Lambrescorne, and a fountain (Fontaine Nostradamus) can be found on Rue Carnot in the old centre of Saint Rémy. NOSTRADAMUS (1503-1566) Michel de Nostredame was born in Saint-Rémy de Provence on 14 December 1503. He grew up surrounded by science and humanism. After a youth devoted to scholarship in Saint Rémy, he studied in Avignon, then at the Faculty of Medicine in Montpellier, where he was nicknamed ‘Nostradamus’ (Latin: ‘we give our own’). This great Renaissance doctor, scholar and humanist, with an interest in geographic and scientific discoveries and new ideas, was passionate about studying the Greek, Latin, Egyptian and Aramean philosophers. After fighting the plague in Marseille and Aix, meeting Erasmus and Scaliger and taking an interest in a number of scientific theories, he became counsellor and astrologer to Catherine de Medici. In 1547, he settled and started a family in Salon de Crau, where he lived until his death. He is best known for the predictions he made during his lifetime and for his ‘Centuries’, mysterious prophecies which still arouse curiosity today. Almost nothing remains of his house of birth, originally surmounted by a tower, apart from a mullioned window. A bust of Nostradamus, created in 1859 by the sculptor Antoine Liotard de Lambrescorne, and a fountain (Fontaine Nostradamus) can be found on Rue Carnot in the old centre of Saint Rémy. NOSTRADAMUS (1503-1566) Michel de Nostredame was born in Saint-Rémy de Provence on 14 December 1503. He grew up surrounded by science and humanism. After a youth devoted to scholarship in Saint Rémy, he studied in Avignon, then at the Faculty of Medicine in Montpellier, where he was nicknamed ‘Nostradamus’ (Latin: ‘we give our own’). This great Renaissance doctor, scholar and humanist, with an interest in geographic and scientific discoveries and new ideas, was passionate about studying the Greek, Latin, Egyptian and Aramean philosophers. After fighting the plague in Marseille and Aix, meeting Erasmus and Scaliger and taking an interest in a number of scientific theories, he became counsellor and astrologer to Catherine de Medici. In 1547, he settled and started a family in Salon de Crau, where he lived until his death. He is best known for the predictions he made during his lifetime and for his ‘Centuries’, mysterious prophecies which still arouse curiosity today. Almost nothing remains of his house of birth, originally surmounted by a tower, apart from a mullioned window. A bust of Nostradamus, created in 1859 by the sculptor Antoine Liotard de Lambrescorne, and a fountain (Fontaine Nostradamus) can be found on Rue Carnot in the old centre of Saint Rémy. Next is the residential area where the spas were located among rich villas like the House of the Antae, the House of Atys and other, more humble, single-storey houses.


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