Lubéron

    Moulin Saint Augustin

    Category: Tag:

    Address

    address

    2800 Route d'Apt

    Town

    Cousteller Oppède

    Postal code

    84580

    Website

    http://www.moulin-saintaugustin.com/

    Map


    Description

    The Saint Augustin Mill is situated on the right bank of the Coulon straddling the villages of Oppède and Ménerbes. It has a long history: many years ago it was here that the hermits lived, making flour as well as wine, olive oil and honey. In 1210, the monks left for Sénanque and sold the property to the Count of Anjou Châteauneuf. He in turn sold it on to the family of the Marquis de Sade, to be followed by a succession of private families. The mill stopped working before the Second World War, only starting up again in 2000-2001. Thanks to the Nibbio family, who acquired the property in 1980, the stone building has come back to life, producing not flour but olive oil… which you are sure to fall for. The shop adjoining the mill has a warm and welcoming atmosphere. It highlights a variety of local products that are both ethical and ecologically-friendly. Here you can find items of food – oils, vinegars, tapenades and appetisers – and cosmetics – soaps, creams and lotions – as well as books on olive trees, olive growing and, of course, olive oil! A tour of the site is a must-see for satisfying the curiosity of any first-time visitor. Some of the remains have been highlighted here and there as evidence of the activities of the mill in earlier times. In the courtyard, a collection of old farming tools is on display, which were once used to work the corn, madder and lavender. The main grindstone, together with the water mechanism, can be found in the shop, and you can ask for a short talk on them (May to September). And why not enjoy the site to the full? Take a seat at one of our picnic tables before strolling along the Coulon. Aglandau is one of the hallmark varieties of French olive oil. It differs from its cousins in that it has a surprising taste, sometimes compared to artichoke, salad or various types of fruit, such as pair, banana, apple or almond. It is the main variety from the Vaucluse that is ground at the mill: it is strong, durable and produces an oil of great character. The olives from Moulin Saint Augustin have three sources: the Luberon, the Rhone Valley and the mountains of the Vaucluse. They are mostly harvested by hand, and are processed quite soon after being picked, depending on the type of oil that is to be produced. Frédéric adds the variety known as Salonenque as a way of creating a unique taste and quality, with the selected olives coming from old trees that are not watered. In addition, some amateur growers entrust the mill with their olives of different varieties: Picholine (for its peppery and bitter strength), Tanche (for its hint of almonds), Cailletier (for its softness and clarity) and Grossane (for its finesse). A total of around 4 to 6 kg of olives is needed to make a single litre of this precious liquid. Just think about it: when you eat olive oil, you are imbibing all the strength and abundance of the trees. And, of course, in addition to its countless benefits, there is the pleasure of the taste. In fact, there is an oil for every taste: they’re not just used in the preparation of anchovy dishes, tapenades and aioli. They add flavour to salads, and enhance the most delicate dishes, even including some desserts! The Moulin Saint Augustin makes two particular oils with unique flavours that can also be found among the products on sale in the shop and at the mill. Green fruitiness is obtained from olives that are just beginning to ripen in November – St Véran – until the first frosts. Aglandau and Salonenque are worked three days after they’re brought in, and give the oil a colour that ranges from olive green to apple green. This fruitiness has a fiery flavour with an after-taste of artichoke. Ripe fruitiness is more gentle: Salonenque is picked when ripe and Aglandau is harvested after the first frost – St Catherine – until Christmas. They both produce a golden oil with woody notes that tastes like black olives. The shop also sells products derived from olive oil as well as two oils flavoured with truffles and basil. These oils, which are made using Salonenque olives, are sure to charm your taste buds. It is worth noting that the oil obtained from Aglandau and Salonenque is particular in that it can also be used for cooking without losing its taste! The Saint Augustin Mill is situated on the right bank of the Coulon straddling the villages of Oppède and Ménerbes. It has a long history: many years ago it was here that the hermits lived, making flour as well as wine, olive oil and honey. In 1210, the monks left for Sénanque and sold the property to the Count of Anjou Châteauneuf. He in turn sold it on to the family of the Marquis de Sade, to be followed by a succession of private families. The mill stopped working before the Second World War, only starting up again in 2000-2001. Thanks to the Nibbio family, who acquired the property in 1980, the stone building has come back to life, producing not flour but olive oil… which you are sure to fall for. The shop adjoining the mill has a warm and welcoming atmosphere. It highlights a variety of local products that are both ethical and ecologically-friendly. Here you can find items of food – oils, vinegars, tapenades and appetisers – and cosmetics – soaps, creams and lotions – as well as books on olive trees, olive growing and, of course, olive oil! A tour of the site is a must-see for satisfying the curiosity of any first-time visitor. Some of the remains have been highlighted here and there as evidence of the activities of the mill in earlier times. In the courtyard, a collection of old farming tools is on display, which were once used to work the corn, madder and lavender. The main grindstone, together with the water mechanism, can be found in the shop, and you can ask for a short talk on them (May to September). And why not enjoy the site to the full? Take a seat at one of our picnic tables before strolling along the Coulon. Aglandau is one of the hallmark varieties of French olive oil. It differs from its cousins in that it has a surprising taste, sometimes compared to artichoke, salad or various types of fruit, such as pair, banana, apple or almond. It is the main variety from the Vaucluse that is ground at the mill: it is strong, durable and produces an oil of great character. The olives from Moulin Saint Augustin have three sources: the Luberon, the Rhone Valley and the mountains of the Vaucluse. They are mostly harvested by hand, and are processed quite soon after being picked, depending on the type of oil that is to be produced. Frédéric adds the variety known as Salonenque as a way of creating a unique taste and quality, with the selected olives coming from old trees that are not watered. In addition, some amateur growers entrust the mill with their olives of different varieties: Picholine (for its peppery and bitter strength), Tanche (for its hint of almonds), Cailletier (for its softness and clarity) and Grossane (for its finesse). A total of around 4 to 6 kg of olives is needed to make a single litre of this precious liquid. Just think about it: when you eat olive oil, you are imbibing all the strength and abundance of the trees. And, of course, in addition to its countless benefits, there is the pleasure of the taste. In fact, there is an oil for every taste: they’re not just used in the preparation of anchovy dishes, tapenades and aioli. They add flavour to salads, and enhance the most delicate dishes, even including some desserts! The Moulin Saint Augustin makes two particular oils with unique flavours that can also be found among the products on sale in the shop and at the mill. Green fruitiness is obtained from olives that are just beginning to ripen in November – St Véran – until the first frosts. Aglandau and Salonenque are worked three days after they’re brought in, and give the oil a colour that ranges from olive green to apple green. This fruitiness has a fiery flavour with an after-taste of artichoke. Ripe fruitiness is more gentle: Salonenque is picked when ripe and Aglandau is harvested after the first frost – St Catherine – until Christmas. They both produce a golden oil with woody notes that tastes like black olives. The shop also sells products derived from olive oil as well as two oils flavoured with truffles and basil. These oils, which are made using Salonenque olives, are sure to charm your taste buds. It is worth noting that the oil obtained from Aglandau and Salonenque is particular in that it can also be used for cooking without losing its taste! The Saint Augustin Mill is situated on the right bank of the Coulon straddling the villages of Oppède and Ménerbes. It has a long history: many years ago it was here that the hermits lived, making flour as well as wine, olive oil and honey. In 1210, the monks left for Sénanque and sold the property to the Count of Anjou Châteauneuf. He in turn sold it on to the family of the Marquis de Sade, to be followed by a succession of private families. The mill stopped working before the Second World War, only starting up again in 2000-2001. Thanks to the Nibbio family, who acquired the property in 1980, the stone building has come back to life, producing not flour but olive oil… which you are sure to fall for. The shop adjoining the mill has a warm and welcoming atmosphere. It highlights a variety of local products that are both ethical and ecologically-friendly. Here you can find items of food – oils, vinegars, tapenades and appetisers – and cosmetics – soaps, creams and lotions – as well as books on olive trees, olive growing and, of course, olive oil! A tour of the site is a must-see for satisfying the curiosity of any first-time visitor. Some of the remains have been highlighted here and there as evidence of the activities of the mill in earlier times. In the courtyard, a collection of old farming tools is on display, which were once used to work the corn, madder and lavender. The main grindstone, together with the water mechanism, can be found in the shop, and you can ask for a short talk on them (May to September). And why not enjoy the site to the full? Take a seat at one of our picnic tables before strolling along the Coulon. Aglandau is one of the hallmark varieties of French olive oil. It differs from its cousins in that it has a surprising taste, sometimes compared to artichoke, salad or various types of fruit, such as pair, banana, apple or almond. It is the main variety from the Vaucluse that is ground at the mill: it is strong, durable and produces an oil of great character. The olives from Moulin Saint Augustin have three sources: the Luberon, the Rhone Valley and the mountains of the Vaucluse. They are mostly harvested by hand, and are processed quite soon after being picked, depending on the type of oil that is to be produced. Frédéric adds the variety known as Salonenque as a way of creating a unique taste and quality, with the selected olives coming from old trees that are not watered. In addition, some amateur growers entrust the mill with their olives of different varieties: Picholine (for its peppery and bitter strength), Tanche (for its hint of almonds), Cailletier (for its softness and clarity) and Grossane (for its finesse). A total of around 4 to 6 kg of olives is needed to make a single litre of this precious liquid. Just think about it: when you eat olive oil, you are imbibing all the strength and abundance of the trees. And, of course, in addition to its countless benefits, there is the pleasure of the taste. In fact, there is an oil for every taste: they’re not just used in the preparation of anchovy dishes, tapenades and aioli. They add flavour to salads, and enhance the most delicate dishes, even including some desserts! The Moulin Saint Augustin makes two particular oils with unique flavours that can also be found among the products on sale in the shop and at the mill. Green fruitiness is obtained from olives that are just beginning to ripen in November – St Véran – until the first frosts. Aglandau and Salonenque are worked three days after they’re brought in, and give the oil a colour that ranges from olive green to apple green. This fruitiness has a fiery flavour with an after-taste of artichoke. Ripe fruitiness is more gentle: Salonenque is picked when ripe and Aglandau is harvested after the first frost – St Catherine – until Christmas. They both produce a golden oil with woody notes that tastes like black olives. The shop also sells products derived from olive oil as well as two oils flavoured with truffles and basil. These oils, which are made using Salonenque olives, are sure to charm your taste buds. It is worth noting that the oil obtained from Aglandau and Salonenque is particular in that it can also be used for cooking without losing its taste! The Saint Augustin Mill is situated on the right bank of the Coulon straddling the villages of Oppède and Ménerbes. It has a long history: many years ago it was here that the hermits lived, making flour as well as wine, olive oil and honey. In 1210, the monks left for Sénanque and sold the property to the Count of Anjou Châteauneuf. He in turn sold it on to the family of the Marquis de Sade, to be followed by a succession of private families. The mill stopped working before the Second World War, only starting up again in 2000-2001. Thanks to the Nibbio family, who acquired the property in 1980, the stone building has come back to life, producing not flour but olive oil… which you are sure to fall for. The shop adjoining the mill has a warm and welcoming atmosphere. It highlights a variety of local products that are both ethical and ecologically-friendly. Here you can find items of food – oils, vinegars, tapenades and appetisers – and cosmetics – soaps, creams and lotions – as well as books on olive trees, olive growing and, of course, olive oil! A tour of the site is a must-see for satisfying the curiosity of any first-time visitor. Some of the remains have been highlighted here and there as evidence of the activities of the mill in earlier times. In the courtyard, a collection of old farming tools is on display, which were once used to work the corn, madder and lavender. The main grindstone, together with the water mechanism, can be found in the shop, and you can ask for a short talk on them (May to September). And why not enjoy the site to the full? Take a seat at one of our picnic tables before strolling along the Coulon. Aglandau is one of the hallmark varieties of French olive oil. It differs from its cousins in that it has a surprising taste, sometimes compared to artichoke, salad or various types of fruit, such as pair, banana, apple or almond. It is the main variety from the Vaucluse that is ground at the mill: it is strong, durable and produces an oil of great character. The olives from Moulin Saint Augustin have three sources: the Luberon, the Rhone Valley and the mountains of the Vaucluse. They are mostly harvested by hand, and are processed quite soon after being picked, depending on the type of oil that is to be produced. Frédéric adds the variety known as Salonenque as a way of creating a unique taste and quality, with the selected olives coming from old trees that are not watered. In addition, some amateur growers entrust the mill with their olives of different varieties: Picholine (for its peppery and bitter strength), Tanche (for its hint of almonds), Cailletier (for its softness and clarity) and Grossane (for its finesse). A total of around 4 to 6 kg of olives is needed to make a single litre of this precious liquid. Just think about it: when you eat olive oil, you are imbibing all the strength and abundance of the trees. And, of course, in addition to its countless benefits, there is the pleasure of the taste. In fact, there is an oil for every taste: they’re not just used in the preparation of anchovy dishes, tapenades and aioli. They add flavour to salads, and enhance the most delicate dishes, even including some desserts! The Moulin Saint Augustin makes two particular oils with unique flavours that can also be found among the products on sale in the shop and at the mill. Green fruitiness is obtained from olives that are just beginning to ripen in November – St Véran – until the first frosts. Aglandau and Salonenque are worked three days after they’re brought in, and give the oil a colour that ranges from olive green to apple green. This fruitiness has a fiery flavour with an after-taste of artichoke. Ripe fruitiness is more gentle: Salonenque is picked when ripe and Aglandau is harvested after the first frost – St Catherine – until Christmas. They both produce a golden oil with woody notes that tastes like black olives. The shop also sells products derived from olive oil as well as two oils flavoured with truffles and basil. These oils, which are made using Salonenque olives, are sure to charm your taste buds. It is worth noting that the oil obtained from Aglandau and Salonenque is particular in that it can also be used for cooking without losing its taste! The Saint Augustin Mill is situated on the right bank of the Coulon straddling the villages of Oppède and Ménerbes. It has a long history: many years ago it was here that the hermits lived, making flour as well as wine, olive oil and honey. In 1210, the monks left for Sénanque and sold the property to the Count of Anjou Châteauneuf. He in turn sold it on to the family of the Marquis de Sade, to be followed by a succession of private families. The mill stopped working before the Second World War, only starting up again in 2000-2001. Thanks to the Nibbio family, who acquired the property in 1980, the stone building has come back to life, producing not flour but olive oil… which you are sure to fall for. The shop adjoining the mill has a warm and welcoming atmosphere. It highlights a variety of local products that are both ethical and ecologically-friendly. Here you can find items of food – oils, vinegars, tapenades and appetisers – and cosmetics – soaps, creams and lotions – as well as books on olive trees, olive growing and, of course, olive oil! A tour of the site is a must-see for satisfying the curiosity of any first-time visitor. Some of the remains have been highlighted here and there as evidence of the activities of the mill in earlier times. In the courtyard, a collection of old farming tools is on display, which were once used to work the corn, madder and lavender. The main grindstone, together with the water mechanism, can be found in the shop, and you can ask for a short talk on them (May to September). And why not enjoy the site to the full? Take a seat at one of our picnic tables before strolling along the Coulon. Aglandau is one of the hallmark varieties of French olive oil. It differs from its cousins in that it has a surprising taste, sometimes compared to artichoke, salad or various types of fruit, such as pair, banana, apple or almond. It is the main variety from the Vaucluse that is ground at the mill: it is strong, durable and produces an oil of great character. The olives from Moulin Saint Augustin have three sources: the Luberon, the Rhone Valley and the mountains of the Vaucluse. They are mostly harvested by hand, and are processed quite soon after being picked, depending on the type of oil that is to be produced. Frédéric adds the variety known as Salonenque as a way of creating a unique taste and quality, with the selected olives coming from old trees that are not watered. In addition, some amateur growers entrust the mill with their olives of different varieties: Picholine (for its peppery and bitter strength), Tanche (for its hint of almonds), Cailletier (for its softness and clarity) and Grossane (for its finesse). A total of around 4 to 6 kg of olives is needed to make a single litre of this precious liquid. Just think about it: when you eat olive oil, you are imbibing all the strength and abundance of the trees. And, of course, in addition to its countless benefits, there is the pleasure of the taste. In fact, there is an oil for every taste: they’re not just used in the preparation of anchovy dishes, tapenades and aioli. They add flavour to salads, and enhance the most delicate dishes, even including some desserts! The Moulin Saint Augustin makes two particular oils with unique flavours that can also be found among the products on sale in the shop and at the mill. Green fruitiness is obtained from olives that are just beginning to ripen in November – St Véran – until the first frosts. Aglandau and Salonenque are worked three days after they’re brought in, and give the oil a colour that ranges from olive green to apple green. This fruitiness has a fiery flavour with an after-taste of artichoke. Ripe fruitiness is more gentle: Salonenque is picked when ripe and Aglandau is harvested after the first frost – St Catherine – until Christmas. They both produce a golden oil with woody notes that tastes like black olives. The shop also sells products derived from olive oil as well as two oils flavoured with truffles and basil. These oils, which are made using Salonenque olives, are sure to charm your taste buds. It is worth noting that the oil obtained from Aglandau and Salonenque is particular in that it can also be used for cooking without losing its taste! The Saint Augustin Mill is situated on the right bank of the Coulon straddling the villages of Oppède and Ménerbes. It has a long history: many years ago it was here that the hermits lived, making flour as well as wine, olive oil and honey. In 1210, the monks left for Sénanque and sold the property to the Count of Anjou Châteauneuf. He in turn sold it on to the family of the Marquis de Sade, to be followed by a succession of private families. The mill stopped working before the Second World War, only starting up again in 2000-2001. Thanks to the Nibbio family, who acquired the property in 1980, the stone building has come back to life, producing not flour but olive oil… which you are sure to fall for. The shop adjoining the mill has a warm and welcoming atmosphere. It highlights a variety of local products that are both ethical and ecologically-friendly. Here you can find items of food – oils, vinegars, tapenades and appetisers – and cosmetics – soaps, creams and lotions – as well as books on olive trees, olive growing and, of course, olive oil! A tour of the site is a must-see for satisfying the curiosity of any first-time visitor. Some of the remains have been highlighted here and there as evidence of the activities of the mill in earlier times. In the courtyard, a collection of old farming tools is on display, which were once used to work the corn, madder and lavender. The main grindstone, together with the water mechanism, can be found in the shop, and you can ask for a short talk on them (May to September). And why not enjoy the site to the full? Take a seat at one of our picnic tables before strolling along the Coulon. Aglandau is one of the hallmark varieties of French olive oil. It differs from its cousins in that it has a surprising taste, sometimes compared to artichoke, salad or various types of fruit, such as pair, banana, apple or almond. It is the main variety from the Vaucluse that is ground at the mill: it is strong, durable and produces an oil of great character. The olives from Moulin Saint Augustin have three sources: the Luberon, the Rhone Valley and the mountains of the Vaucluse. They are mostly harvested by hand, and are processed quite soon after being picked, depending on the type of oil that is to be produced. Frédéric adds the variety known as Salonenque as a way of creating a unique taste and quality, with the selected olives coming from old trees that are not watered. In addition, some amateur growers entrust the mill with their olives of different varieties: Picholine (for its peppery and bitter strength), Tanche (for its hint of almonds), Cailletier (for its softness and clarity) and Grossane (for its finesse). A total of around 4 to 6 kg of olives is needed to make a single litre of this precious liquid. Just think about it: when you eat olive oil, you are imbibing all the strength and abundance of the trees. And, of course, in addition to its countless benefits, there is the pleasure of the taste. In fact, there is an oil for every taste: they’re not just used in the preparation of anchovy dishes, tapenades and aioli. They add flavour to salads, and enhance the most delicate dishes, even including some desserts! The Moulin Saint Augustin makes two particular oils with unique flavours that can also be found among the products on sale in the shop and at the mill. Green fruitiness is obtained from olives that are just beginning to ripen in November – St Véran – until the first frosts. Aglandau and Salonenque are worked three days after they’re brought in, and give the oil a colour that ranges from olive green to apple green. This fruitiness has a fiery flavour with an after-taste of artichoke. Ripe fruitiness is more gentle: Salonenque is picked when ripe and Aglandau is harvested after the first frost – St Catherine – until Christmas. They both produce a golden oil with woody notes that tastes like black olives. The shop also sells products derived from olive oil as well as two oils flavoured with truffles and basil. These oils, which are made using Salonenque olives, are sure to charm your taste buds. It is worth noting that the oil obtained from Aglandau and Salonenque is particular in that it can also be used for cooking without losing its taste! The Saint Augustin Mill is situated on the right bank of the Coulon straddling the villages of Oppède and Ménerbes. It has a long history: many years ago it was here that the hermits lived, making flour as well as wine, olive oil and honey. In 1210, the monks left for Sénanque and sold the property to the Count of Anjou Châteauneuf. He in turn sold it on to the family of the Marquis de Sade, to be followed by a succession of private families. The mill stopped working before the Second World War, only starting up again in 2000-2001. Thanks to the Nibbio family, who acquired the property in 1980, the stone building has come back to life, producing not flour but olive oil… which you are sure to fall for. The shop adjoining the mill has a warm and welcoming atmosphere. It highlights a variety of local products that are both ethical and ecologically-friendly. Here you can find items of food – oils, vinegars, tapenades and appetisers – and cosmetics – soaps, creams and lotions – as well as books on olive trees, olive growing and, of course, olive oil! A tour of the site is a must-see for satisfying the curiosity of any first-time visitor. Some of the remains have been highlighted here and there as evidence of the activities of the mill in earlier times. In the courtyard, a collection of old farming tools is on display, which were once used to work the corn, madder and lavender. The main grindstone, together with the water mechanism, can be found in the shop, and you can ask for a short talk on them (May to September). And why not enjoy the site to the full? Take a seat at one of our picnic tables before strolling along the Coulon. Aglandau is one of the hallmark varieties of French olive oil. It differs from its cousins in that it has a surprising taste, sometimes compared to artichoke, salad or various types of fruit, such as pair, banana, apple or almond. It is the main variety from the Vaucluse that is ground at the mill: it is strong, durable and produces an oil of great character. The olives from Moulin Saint Augustin have three sources: the Luberon, the Rhone Valley and the mountains of the Vaucluse. They are mostly harvested by hand, and are processed quite soon after being picked, depending on the type of oil that is to be produced. Frédéric adds the variety known as Salonenque as a way of creating a unique taste and quality, with the selected olives coming from old trees that are not watered. In addition, some amateur growers entrust the mill with their olives of different varieties: Picholine (for its peppery and bitter strength), Tanche (for its hint of almonds), Cailletier (for its softness and clarity) and Grossane (for its finesse). A total of around 4 to 6 kg of olives is needed to make a single litre of this precious liquid. Just think about it: when you eat olive oil, you are imbibing all the strength and abundance of the trees. And, of course, in addition to its countless benefits, there is the pleasure of the taste. In fact, there is an oil for every taste: they’re not just used in the preparation of anchovy dishes, tapenades and aioli. They add flavour to salads, and enhance the most delicate dishes, even including some desserts! The Moulin Saint Augustin makes two particular oils with unique flavours that can also be found among the products on sale in the shop and at the mill. Green fruitiness is obtained from olives that are just beginning to ripen in November – St Véran – until the first frosts. Aglandau and Salonenque are worked three days after they’re brought in, and give the oil a colour that ranges from olive green to apple green. This fruitiness has a fiery flavour with an after-taste of artichoke. Ripe fruitiness is more gentle: Salonenque is picked when ripe and Aglandau is harvested after the first frost – St Catherine – until Christmas. They both produce a golden oil with woody notes that tastes like black olives. The shop also sells products derived from olive oil as well as two oils flavoured with truffles and basil. These oils, which are made using Salonenque olives, are sure to charm your taste buds. It is worth noting that the oil obtained from Aglandau and Salonenque is particular in that it can also be used for cooking without losing its taste!


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