Alpilles

    Moulin du Calanquet

    Category: Tag:

    Address

    address

    Vieux Chemin d'Arles

    Town

    Saint-Rémy-de-Provence

    Postal code

    13210

    Website

    http://www.moulinducalanquet.fr/

    Map


    Description

    Moulin de Calanquet The Moulin du Calanquet was founded in 2000 by Anne Brun and her brother Gilles, the fifth generation of farmers on the property. Although their grandparents had a handful of olive trees, they were forced to dispose of them all following the terrible frost of 1956; it was then that they began to grow potatoes, tomatoes and the like. The parents continued with vegetables until, in 1997, they decided with their sons to replant olive trees. They stopped growing vegetables in 2004 and started to focus on olive production, which explains why their olive trees are young and the mill modern. There were five mills in Saint-Rémy-de-Provence in the 1950s but after the frost of 1956 they were all obliged to close down. The growers were then left with one of two choices: either wait for the branches to grow and count on three to four years before having new olives; or dispose of all the olive trees and start new crops. They chose the latter option because time was pressing for a new harvest. The name ‘Calanquet’ comes from the small mountains to the north of the property; a calan in Provençal is a hill that protects against the Mistral wind. Olive growing. March: the trees are pruned with shears, and always on the inside so that light can penetrate the tree. May: the flowers appear. These are very small, and white and yellow in colour. Out of 100 flowers, only five olives will survive: the huge losses are explained by the fact that olive trees are pollinated by the wind, which is also the reason why you will never come across olive honey. It is fortunate, too, that not every flower turns into an olive, otherwise the tree would not be able to withstand the weight! September: the first harvest of green olives for eating takes place. Note in passing that there is only one colour of olive: they are green before turning black. If you want to eat the olives, they have to be prepared first by marinating them in brine (a mixture of water and salt) for a month to six weeks, after which they will be ready to eat. From October: the harvest for olive oil begins: a piece of fabric is placed on the ground under the trees and the branches are combed by hand to make the olives (both black and green) fall off. Green and black olive fruitiness explained. The olive harvest may be divided into three processes or, more accurately, three types of oil: Green olive fruitiness: the olives are harvested whilst they are mainly green and are pressed in less than 24 hours, with the result that the fruit does not have time to ferment. This type of oil has the aroma of raw artichokes, apples and freshly-cut grass. Ripe olive fruitiness: the olives are harvested when they are riper and have the aroma of almonds or berries. Black olive fruitiness: both green and black olives are harvested but the fruit is left to ferment for around ten days. The aroma is of wood and mushrooms. In this case, only the green fruitiness is processed. We suggest that, for a detailed exploration of the methods used to extract oil on the estate, you join in a tour of the mill. You can also discover the richness of the olives produced here with a tasting given by the owners. Moulin de Calanquet The Moulin du Calanquet was founded in 2000 by Anne Brun and her brother Gilles, the fifth generation of farmers on the property. Although their grandparents had a handful of olive trees, they were forced to dispose of them all following the terrible frost of 1956; it was then that they began to grow potatoes, tomatoes and the like. The parents continued with vegetables until, in 1997, they decided with their sons to replant olive trees. They stopped growing vegetables in 2004 and started to focus on olive production, which explains why their olive trees are young and the mill modern. There were five mills in Saint-Rémy-de-Provence in the 1950s but after the frost of 1956 they were all obliged to close down. The growers were then left with one of two choices: either wait for the branches to grow and count on three to four years before having new olives; or dispose of all the olive trees and start new crops. They chose the latter option because time was pressing for a new harvest. The name ‘Calanquet’ comes from the small mountains to the north of the property; a calan in Provençal is a hill that protects against the Mistral wind. Olive growing. March: the trees are pruned with shears, and always on the inside so that light can penetrate the tree. May: the flowers appear. These are very small, and white and yellow in colour. Out of 100 flowers, only five olives will survive: the huge losses are explained by the fact that olive trees are pollinated by the wind, which is also the reason why you will never come across olive honey. It is fortunate, too, that not every flower turns into an olive, otherwise the tree would not be able to withstand the weight! September: the first harvest of green olives for eating takes place. Note in passing that there is only one colour of olive: they are green before turning black. If you want to eat the olives, they have to be prepared first by marinating them in brine (a mixture of water and salt) for a month to six weeks, after which they will be ready to eat. From October: the harvest for olive oil begins: a piece of fabric is placed on the ground under the trees and the branches are combed by hand to make the olives (both black and green) fall off. Green and black olive fruitiness explained. The olive harvest may be divided into three processes or, more accurately, three types of oil: Green olive fruitiness: the olives are harvested whilst they are mainly green and are pressed in less than 24 hours, with the result that the fruit does not have time to ferment. This type of oil has the aroma of raw artichokes, apples and freshly-cut grass. Ripe olive fruitiness: the olives are harvested when they are riper and have the aroma of almonds or berries. Black olive fruitiness: both green and black olives are harvested but the fruit is left to ferment for around ten days. The aroma is of wood and mushrooms. In this case, only the green fruitiness is processed. We suggest that, for a detailed exploration of the methods used to extract oil on the estate, you join in a tour of the mill. You can also discover the richness of the olives produced here with a tasting given by the owners. Moulin de Calanquet The Moulin du Calanquet was founded in 2000 by Anne Brun and her brother Gilles, the fifth generation of farmers on the property. Although their grandparents had a handful of olive trees, they were forced to dispose of them all following the terrible frost of 1956; it was then that they began to grow potatoes, tomatoes and the like. The parents continued with vegetables until, in 1997, they decided with their sons to replant olive trees. They stopped growing vegetables in 2004 and started to focus on olive production, which explains why their olive trees are young and the mill modern. There were five mills in Saint-Rémy-de-Provence in the 1950s but after the frost of 1956 they were all obliged to close down. The growers were then left with one of two choices: either wait for the branches to grow and count on three to four years before having new olives; or dispose of all the olive trees and start new crops. They chose the latter option because time was pressing for a new harvest. The name ‘Calanquet’ comes from the small mountains to the north of the property; a calan in Provençal is a hill that protects against the Mistral wind. Olive growing. March: the trees are pruned with shears, and always on the inside so that light can penetrate the tree. May: the flowers appear. These are very small, and white and yellow in colour. Out of 100 flowers, only five olives will survive: the huge losses are explained by the fact that olive trees are pollinated by the wind, which is also the reason why you will never come across olive honey. It is fortunate, too, that not every flower turns into an olive, otherwise the tree would not be able to withstand the weight! September: the first harvest of green olives for eating takes place. Note in passing that there is only one colour of olive: they are green before turning black. If you want to eat the olives, they have to be prepared first by marinating them in brine (a mixture of water and salt) for a month to six weeks, after which they will be ready to eat. From October: the harvest for olive oil begins: a piece of fabric is placed on the ground under the trees and the branches are combed by hand to make the olives (both black and green) fall off. Green and black olive fruitiness explained. The olive harvest may be divided into three processes or, more accurately, three types of oil: Green olive fruitiness: the olives are harvested whilst they are mainly green and are pressed in less than 24 hours, with the result that the fruit does not have time to ferment. This type of oil has the aroma of raw artichokes, apples and freshly-cut grass. Ripe olive fruitiness: the olives are harvested when they are riper and have the aroma of almonds or berries. Black olive fruitiness: both green and black olives are harvested but the fruit is left to ferment for around ten days. The aroma is of wood and mushrooms. In this case, only the green fruitiness is processed. We suggest that, for a detailed exploration of the methods used to extract oil on the estate, you join in a tour of the mill. You can also discover the richness of the olives produced here with a tasting given by the owners. Moulin de Calanquet The Moulin du Calanquet was founded in 2000 by Anne Brun and her brother Gilles, the fifth generation of farmers on the property. Although their grandparents had a handful of olive trees, they were forced to dispose of them all following the terrible frost of 1956; it was then that they began to grow potatoes, tomatoes and the like. The parents continued with vegetables until, in 1997, they decided with their sons to replant olive trees. They stopped growing vegetables in 2004 and started to focus on olive production, which explains why their olive trees are young and the mill modern. There were five mills in Saint-Rémy-de-Provence in the 1950s but after the frost of 1956 they were all obliged to close down. The growers were then left with one of two choices: either wait for the branches to grow and count on three to four years before having new olives; or dispose of all the olive trees and start new crops. They chose the latter option because time was pressing for a new harvest. The name ‘Calanquet’ comes from the small mountains to the north of the property; a calan in Provençal is a hill that protects against the Mistral wind. Olive growing. March: the trees are pruned with shears, and always on the inside so that light can penetrate the tree. May: the flowers appear. These are very small, and white and yellow in colour. Out of 100 flowers, only five olives will survive: the huge losses are explained by the fact that olive trees are pollinated by the wind, which is also the reason why you will never come across olive honey. It is fortunate, too, that not every flower turns into an olive, otherwise the tree would not be able to withstand the weight! September: the first harvest of green olives for eating takes place. Note in passing that there is only one colour of olive: they are green before turning black. If you want to eat the olives, they have to be prepared first by marinating them in brine (a mixture of water and salt) for a month to six weeks, after which they will be ready to eat. From October: the harvest for olive oil begins: a piece of fabric is placed on the ground under the trees and the branches are combed by hand to make the olives (both black and green) fall off. Green and black olive fruitiness explained. The olive harvest may be divided into three processes or, more accurately, three types of oil: Green olive fruitiness: the olives are harvested whilst they are mainly green and are pressed in less than 24 hours, with the result that the fruit does not have time to ferment. This type of oil has the aroma of raw artichokes, apples and freshly-cut grass. Ripe olive fruitiness: the olives are harvested when they are riper and have the aroma of almonds or berries. Black olive fruitiness: both green and black olives are harvested but the fruit is left to ferment for around ten days. The aroma is of wood and mushrooms. In this case, only the green fruitiness is processed. We suggest that, for a detailed exploration of the methods used to extract oil on the estate, you join in a tour of the mill. You can also discover the richness of the olives produced here with a tasting given by the owners. Moulin de Calanquet The Moulin du Calanquet was founded in 2000 by Anne Brun and her brother Gilles, the fifth generation of farmers on the property. Although their grandparents had a handful of olive trees, they were forced to dispose of them all following the terrible frost of 1956; it was then that they began to grow potatoes, tomatoes and the like. The parents continued with vegetables until, in 1997, they decided with their sons to replant olive trees. They stopped growing vegetables in 2004 and started to focus on olive production, which explains why their olive trees are young and the mill modern. There were five mills in Saint-Rémy-de-Provence in the 1950s but after the frost of 1956 they were all obliged to close down. The growers were then left with one of two choices: either wait for the branches to grow and count on three to four years before having new olives; or dispose of all the olive trees and start new crops. They chose the latter option because time was pressing for a new harvest. The name ‘Calanquet’ comes from the small mountains to the north of the property; a calan in Provençal is a hill that protects against the Mistral wind. Olive growing. March: the trees are pruned with shears, and always on the inside so that light can penetrate the tree. May: the flowers appear. These are very small, and white and yellow in colour. Out of 100 flowers, only five olives will survive: the huge losses are explained by the fact that olive trees are pollinated by the wind, which is also the reason why you will never come across olive honey. It is fortunate, too, that not every flower turns into an olive, otherwise the tree would not be able to withstand the weight! September: the first harvest of green olives for eating takes place. Note in passing that there is only one colour of olive: they are green before turning black. If you want to eat the olives, they have to be prepared first by marinating them in brine (a mixture of water and salt) for a month to six weeks, after which they will be ready to eat. From October: the harvest for olive oil begins: a piece of fabric is placed on the ground under the trees and the branches are combed by hand to make the olives (both black and green) fall off. Green and black olive fruitiness explained. The olive harvest may be divided into three processes or, more accurately, three types of oil: Green olive fruitiness: the olives are harvested whilst they are mainly green and are pressed in less than 24 hours, with the result that the fruit does not have time to ferment. This type of oil has the aroma of raw artichokes, apples and freshly-cut grass. Ripe olive fruitiness: the olives are harvested when they are riper and have the aroma of almonds or berries. Black olive fruitiness: both green and black olives are harvested but the fruit is left to ferment for around ten days. The aroma is of wood and mushrooms. In this case, only the green fruitiness is processed. We suggest that, for a detailed exploration of the methods used to extract oil on the estate, you join in a tour of the mill. You can also discover the richness of the olives produced here with a tasting given by the owners. Moulin de Calanquet The Moulin du Calanquet was founded in 2000 by Anne Brun and her brother Gilles, the fifth generation of farmers on the property. Although their grandparents had a handful of olive trees, they were forced to dispose of them all following the terrible frost of 1956; it was then that they began to grow potatoes, tomatoes and the like. The parents continued with vegetables until, in 1997, they decided with their sons to replant olive trees. They stopped growing vegetables in 2004 and started to focus on olive production, which explains why their olive trees are young and the mill modern. There were five mills in Saint-Rémy-de-Provence in the 1950s but after the frost of 1956 they were all obliged to close down. The growers were then left with one of two choices: either wait for the branches to grow and count on three to four years before having new olives; or dispose of all the olive trees and start new crops. They chose the latter option because time was pressing for a new harvest. The name ‘Calanquet’ comes from the small mountains to the north of the property; a calan in Provençal is a hill that protects against the Mistral wind. Olive growing. March: the trees are pruned with shears, and always on the inside so that light can penetrate the tree. May: the flowers appear. These are very small, and white and yellow in colour. Out of 100 flowers, only five olives will survive: the huge losses are explained by the fact that olive trees are pollinated by the wind, which is also the reason why you will never come across olive honey. It is fortunate, too, that not every flower turns into an olive, otherwise the tree would not be able to withstand the weight! September: the first harvest of green olives for eating takes place. Note in passing that there is only one colour of olive: they are green before turning black. If you want to eat the olives, they have to be prepared first by marinating them in brine (a mixture of water and salt) for a month to six weeks, after which they will be ready to eat. From October: the harvest for olive oil begins: a piece of fabric is placed on the ground under the trees and the branches are combed by hand to make the olives (both black and green) fall off. Green and black olive fruitiness explained. The olive harvest may be divided into three processes or, more accurately, three types of oil: Green olive fruitiness: the olives are harvested whilst they are mainly green and are pressed in less than 24 hours, with the result that the fruit does not have time to ferment. This type of oil has the aroma of raw artichokes, apples and freshly-cut grass. Ripe olive fruitiness: the olives are harvested when they are riper and have the aroma of almonds or berries. Black olive fruitiness: both green and black olives are harvested but the fruit is left to ferment for around ten days. The aroma is of wood and mushrooms. In this case, only the green fruitiness is processed. We suggest that, for a detailed exploration of the methods used to extract oil on the estate, you join in a tour of the mill. You can also discover the richness of the olives produced here with a tasting given by the owners. Moulin de Calanquet The Moulin du Calanquet was founded in 2000 by Anne Brun and her brother Gilles, the fifth generation of farmers on the property. Although their grandparents had a handful of olive trees, they were forced to dispose of them all following the terrible frost of 1956; it was then that they began to grow potatoes, tomatoes and the like. The parents continued with vegetables until, in 1997, they decided with their sons to replant olive trees. They stopped growing vegetables in 2004 and started to focus on olive production, which explains why their olive trees are young and the mill modern. There were five mills in Saint-Rémy-de-Provence in the 1950s but after the frost of 1956 they were all obliged to close down. The growers were then left with one of two choices: either wait for the branches to grow and count on three to four years before having new olives; or dispose of all the olive trees and start new crops. They chose the latter option because time was pressing for a new harvest. The name ‘Calanquet’ comes from the small mountains to the north of the property; a calan in Provençal is a hill that protects against the Mistral wind. Olive growing. March: the trees are pruned with shears, and always on the inside so that light can penetrate the tree. May: the flowers appear. These are very small, and white and yellow in colour. Out of 100 flowers, only five olives will survive: the huge losses are explained by the fact that olive trees are pollinated by the wind, which is also the reason why you will never come across olive honey. It is fortunate, too, that not every flower turns into an olive, otherwise the tree would not be able to withstand the weight! September: the first harvest of green olives for eating takes place. Note in passing that there is only one colour of olive: they are green before turning black. If you want to eat the olives, they have to be prepared first by marinating them in brine (a mixture of water and salt) for a month to six weeks, after which they will be ready to eat. From October: the harvest for olive oil begins: a piece of fabric is placed on the ground under the trees and the branches are combed by hand to make the olives (both black and green) fall off. Green and black olive fruitiness explained. The olive harvest may be divided into three processes or, more accurately, three types of oil: Green olive fruitiness: the olives are harvested whilst they are mainly green and are pressed in less than 24 hours, with the result that the fruit does not have time to ferment. This type of oil has the aroma of raw artichokes, apples and freshly-cut grass. Ripe olive fruitiness: the olives are harvested when they are riper and have the aroma of almonds or berries. Black olive fruitiness: both green and black olives are harvested but the fruit is left to ferment for around ten days. The aroma is of wood and mushrooms. In this case, only the green fruitiness is processed. We suggest that, for a detailed exploration of the methods used to extract oil on the estate, you join in a tour of the mill. You can also discover the richness of the olives produced here with a tasting given by the owners. Moulin de Calanquet The Moulin du Calanquet was founded in 2000 by Anne Brun and her brother Gilles, the fifth generation of farmers on the property. Although their grandparents had a handful of olive trees, they were forced to dispose of them all following the terrible frost of 1956; it was then that they began to grow potatoes, tomatoes and the like. The parents continued with vegetables until, in 1997, they decided with their sons to replant olive trees. They stopped growing vegetables in 2004 and started to focus on olive production, which explains why their olive trees are young and the mill modern. There were five mills in Saint-Rémy-de-Provence in the 1950s but after the frost of 1956 they were all obliged to close down. The growers were then left with one of two choices: either wait for the branches to grow and count on three to four years before having new olives; or dispose of all the olive trees and start new crops. They chose the latter option because time was pressing for a new harvest. The name ‘Calanquet’ comes from the small mountains to the north of the property; a calan in Provençal is a hill that protects against the Mistral wind. Olive growing. March: the trees are pruned with shears, and always on the inside so that light can penetrate the tree. May: the flowers appear. These are very small, and white and yellow in colour. Out of 100 flowers, only five olives will survive: the huge losses are explained by the fact that olive trees are pollinated by the wind, which is also the reason why you will never come across olive honey. It is fortunate, too, that not every flower turns into an olive, otherwise the tree would not be able to withstand the weight! September: the first harvest of green olives for eating takes place. Note in passing that there is only one colour of olive: they are green before turning black. If you want to eat the olives, they have to be prepared first by marinating them in brine (a mixture of water and salt) for a month to six weeks, after which they will be ready to eat. From October: the harvest for olive oil begins: a piece of fabric is placed on the ground under the trees and the branches are combed by hand to make the olives (both black and green) fall off. Green and black olive fruitiness explained. The olive harvest may be divided into three processes or, more accurately, three types of oil: Green olive fruitiness: the olives are harvested whilst they are mainly green and are pressed in less than 24 hours, with the result that the fruit does not have time to ferment. This type of oil has the aroma of raw artichokes, apples and freshly-cut grass. Ripe olive fruitiness: the olives are harvested when they are riper and have the aroma of almonds or berries. Black olive fruitiness: both green and black olives are harvested but the fruit is left to ferment for around ten days. The aroma is of wood and mushrooms. In this case, only the green fruitiness is processed. We suggest that, for a detailed exploration of the methods used to extract oil on the estate, you join in a tour of the mill. You can also discover the richness of the olives produced here with a tasting given by the owners.


    Practical Information

    Price conditions

    Free

    Reviews (0)

    Reviews


    There are no reviews yet.

    Be the first to review “Moulin du Calanquet”