Alpilles

    Maussane les Alpilles Village

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    Town

    Maussane-les-Alpilles

    Website

    https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maussane-les-Alpilles

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    Description

    The area to the south of the rocks of La Pène was completely flooded until the 1880s and was known as the ‘swamp of Les Baux’. This large lake, extending over several hectares, teemed with fish that provided a living for generations of local Maussane fishermen. The marshes were gradually drained for health reasons in the 1830s. The village is crossed by several gaudres (Provençal for ‘brook’), which all have their sources in the Alpilles mountains and complete their course in various channels in the former marshes. Maussane has the appearance of a typical Provençal village. The village extends along Avenue de la Vallée-des-Baux and is mainly concentrated around the church square, which goes by the name of Place Laugier-de-Monblan. Along the main road, a row of plane trees lines the house fronts. The village’s historic core, to the south of the D 17 road and a few streets to the north, is centered on the square, which is the focus of life for the inhabitants. The area to the south of the rocks of La Pène was completely flooded until the 1880s and was known as the ‘swamp of Les Baux’. This large lake, extending over several hectares, teemed with fish that provided a living for generations of local Maussane fishermen. The marshes were gradually drained for health reasons in the 1830s. The village is crossed by several gaudres (Provençal for ‘brook’), which all have their sources in the Alpilles mountains and complete their course in various channels in the former marshes. Maussane has the appearance of a typical Provençal village. The village extends along Avenue de la Vallée-des-Baux and is mainly concentrated around the church square, which goes by the name of Place Laugier-de-Monblan. Along the main road, a row of plane trees lines the house fronts. The village’s historic core, to the south of the D 17 road and a few streets to the north, is centered on the square, which is the focus of life for the inhabitants. The area to the south of the rocks of La Pène was completely flooded until the 1880s and was known as the ‘swamp of Les Baux’. This large lake, extending over several hectares, teemed with fish that provided a living for generations of local Maussane fishermen. The marshes were gradually drained for health reasons in the 1830s. The village is crossed by several gaudres (Provençal for ‘brook’), which all have their sources in the Alpilles mountains and complete their course in various channels in the former marshes. Maussane has the appearance of a typical Provençal village. The village extends along Avenue de la Vallée-des-Baux and is mainly concentrated around the church square, which goes by the name of Place Laugier-de-Monblan. Along the main road, a row of plane trees lines the house fronts. The village’s historic core, to the south of the D 17 road and a few streets to the north, is centered on the square, which is the focus of life for the inhabitants. The area to the south of the rocks of La Pène was completely flooded until the 1880s and was known as the ‘swamp of Les Baux’. This large lake, extending over several hectares, teemed with fish that provided a living for generations of local Maussane fishermen. The marshes were gradually drained for health reasons in the 1830s. The village is crossed by several gaudres (Provençal for ‘brook’), which all have their sources in the Alpilles mountains and complete their course in various channels in the former marshes. Maussane has the appearance of a typical Provençal village. The village extends along Avenue de la Vallée-des-Baux and is mainly concentrated around the church square, which goes by the name of Place Laugier-de-Monblan. Along the main road, a row of plane trees lines the house fronts. The village’s historic core, to the south of the D 17 road and a few streets to the north, is centered on the square, which is the focus of life for the inhabitants. The area to the south of the rocks of La Pène was completely flooded until the 1880s and was known as the ‘swamp of Les Baux’. This large lake, extending over several hectares, teemed with fish that provided a living for generations of local Maussane fishermen. The marshes were gradually drained for health reasons in the 1830s. The village is crossed by several gaudres (Provençal for ‘brook’), which all have their sources in the Alpilles mountains and complete their course in various channels in the former marshes. Maussane has the appearance of a typical Provençal village. The village extends along Avenue de la Vallée-des-Baux and is mainly concentrated around the church square, which goes by the name of Place Laugier-de-Monblan. Along the main road, a row of plane trees lines the house fronts. The village’s historic core, to the south of the D 17 road and a few streets to the north, is centered on the square, which is the focus of life for the inhabitants. The area to the south of the rocks of La Pène was completely flooded until the 1880s and was known as the ‘swamp of Les Baux’. This large lake, extending over several hectares, teemed with fish that provided a living for generations of local Maussane fishermen. The marshes were gradually drained for health reasons in the 1830s. The village is crossed by several gaudres (Provençal for ‘brook’), which all have their sources in the Alpilles mountains and complete their course in various channels in the former marshes. Maussane has the appearance of a typical Provençal village. The village extends along Avenue de la Vallée-des-Baux and is mainly concentrated around the church square, which goes by the name of Place Laugier-de-Monblan. Along the main road, a row of plane trees lines the house fronts. The village’s historic core, to the south of the D 17 road and a few streets to the north, is centered on the square, which is the focus of life for the inhabitants. The area to the south of the rocks of La Pène was completely flooded until the 1880s and was known as the ‘swamp of Les Baux’. This large lake, extending over several hectares, teemed with fish that provided a living for generations of local Maussane fishermen. The marshes were gradually drained for health reasons in the 1830s. The village is crossed by several gaudres (Provençal for ‘brook’), which all have their sources in the Alpilles mountains and complete their course in various channels in the former marshes. Maussane has the appearance of a typical Provençal village. The village extends along Avenue de la Vallée-des-Baux and is mainly concentrated around the church square, which goes by the name of Place Laugier-de-Monblan. Along the main road, a row of plane trees lines the house fronts. The village’s historic core, to the south of the D 17 road and a few streets to the north, is centered on the square, which is the focus of life for the inhabitants. The area to the south of the rocks of La Pène was completely flooded until the 1880s and was known as the ‘swamp of Les Baux’. This large lake, extending over several hectares, teemed with fish that provided a living for generations of local Maussane fishermen. The marshes were gradually drained for health reasons in the 1830s. The village is crossed by several gaudres (Provençal for ‘brook’), which all have their sources in the Alpilles mountains and complete their course in various channels in the former marshes. Maussane has the appearance of a typical Provençal village. The village extends along Avenue de la Vallée-des-Baux and is mainly concentrated around the church square, which goes by the name of Place Laugier-de-Monblan. Along the main road, a row of plane trees lines the house fronts. The village’s historic core, to the south of the D 17 road and a few streets to the north, is centered on the square, which is the focus of life for the inhabitants.


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