Alpilles

    Lilamand

    Category: Tag:

    Address

    address

    5 Avenue Albert Schweitzer

    Town

    Saint-Rémy-de-Provence

    Postal code

    13210

    Website

    http://www.confiserie-lilamand.com/

    Map


    Description

    Crystallised fruit is one of the oldest ways of preserving fruits. The first traces of this process date back to the 1st century A.D., when the Romans preserved fruits using honey. Crystallising fruit involves removing the water and acidity from the fruit and replacing them with sugar syrup. In Provence, fruits were first preserved by crystallisation in the Middle Ages. Crystallised fruits became very popular and were a great delicacy when Avignon became a Papal City. Like most Patissiers–Confectioners at the time, Marius Lilamand, who opened his Patisserie–Confectionery in the centre of Saint Rémy, opposite the Hôtel de Sade, in 1866, made all kinds of patisseries and chocolates, as well as crystallised fruits. In 1903, his son, Justin, bought an old tannery on the Route d’Avignon, on the way out of Saint Rémy. He turned it into a Confectionery and exclusively produced crystallised fruit, fruit in syrup and jams, which he sold to professional Patissiers–Confectioners, who displayed them in their shop windows or used them for preparing patisserie. Pierre and Philippe, the fifth generation of the Lilamand family began to work together in 1998, opening a shop inside the factory in 2011. When the fruit arrives at the factory, it is sorted, manually of course, so that the quality and ripeness can be assessed and the fruit which cannot be crystallised can be removed. The melons, pears with stalks, and pineapple are all peeled. The oranges, lemons, grapefruit, kiwis and melons are cut into slices, as are the pineapples. The apricots are stoned and the strawberries, plums, figs, kumquats, clementines, etc. are merely rinsed. They are then soaked in brine, a precise combination of water and sulphur which stabilises the fruit and stops it ripening. This also allows the storage of large volumes of fruit which cannot be processed immediately and simultaneously, as well as the staggering of production, since that the main requirement is to have a sufficient volume of fruit to last until the next harvest, i.e. the following year, for all fruits. All the fruit is picked manually, using a large needle to make it easier for the syrup to penetrate into its centre later in the process. It is then blanched, which means that it is poured into a vat of clean water and boiled for the first time to soften its flesh and remove the fibres. This first, very gentle, contact requires great expertise on the part of the Confectioner. The fruit is then placed in syrup. The sufficiently softened fruit is rinsed in clean water. The sulphur evaporates during the boiling process. The next, very long, stage involves a series of boiling operations, interspersed with rest time, so that the fruit can recover; this process lasts three to four weeks. The fruit is boiled up to seven times, during which time osmosis occurs between the fruit and the syrup, which blend together until they are fully concentrated. The fruit and syrup are then poured into an earthenware jar, which is waiting under the cooking basins. And it is then, in an explosion of falling syrup, that burning, sticky drops are projected a distance of almost one metre and splash the confectioners, who continue their work without batting an eyelid, insensitive to this constant torture. After these laborious stages, a lot of the fruit is bruised and has to be sorted once again. The damaged fruit is removed and the rest is graded so that it is of similar size once packaged. After this manual sorting, the fruit is boiled one last time in the ‘final’ boiling operation, before being deliberately abandoned in its terracotta jar, soaking in its syrup in ‘fruitiers’, which are dark, warm rooms where it is stored for at least two months. The fruit is then drained; it is only when an order is received that the fruit is removed from the syrup in which it is soaking. The earthenware jars are poured into wicker baskets or perforated sieves placed on an earthenware jar which collects the syrup dripping through the mesh. The fruit, trapped in its wicker basket, can be packaged as it is, sticky and shiny, for patisserie ‘laboratories’ or it can undergo the ultimate soaking experience, namely glazing. To cover the fruit in sugar, which will protect it and reduce the sticky sensation, it is soaked one last time in a pure, concentrated sugar syrup. In its desire for excellence, the Confiserie Lilamand continues to glaze fruit by hand. At least four people are involved in this operation, which allows around 500 kg of fruit to be glazed during a working day. This seems an enormous amount, but is derisory when we consider that an automated machine with just two ‘operators’ could do it in one hour. It is this precision and drive that really convey the commitment to absolute quality, with no compromises allowed. It takes just over three months to reach the final stage, when the fruit, enhanced by its transformation, gives back everything nature had given it. Admittedly, it receives a helping hand from man, who is no more than a craftsman, working with the best that Provence has to offer. The pride of the Confiserie Lilamand remains the fact that it supplies the most famous ‘Maisons’ in France and Europe, such as Dalloyau and Verlet in Paris, Senequier in Saint Tropez and Wittamer in Brussels… (apologies to the others), and that people, anonymous or otherwise, but sharing with a love of good things, often travel great distances or make a detour to resupply, and thank them for existing. We have seen it written that Lilamand candied fruits are a national treasure and they are obviously keen to remain so. There is a shop, where you can discover colours and aromas that defy your imagination. Crystallised fruit is one of the oldest ways of preserving fruits. The first traces of this process date back to the 1st century A.D., when the Romans preserved fruits using honey. Crystallising fruit involves removing the water and acidity from the fruit and replacing them with sugar syrup. In Provence, fruits were first preserved by crystallisation in the Middle Ages. Crystallised fruits became very popular and were a great delicacy when Avignon became a Papal City. Like most Patissiers–Confectioners at the time, Marius Lilamand, who opened his Patisserie–Confectionery in the centre of Saint Rémy, opposite the Hôtel de Sade, in 1866, made all kinds of patisseries and chocolates, as well as crystallised fruits. In 1903, his son, Justin, bought an old tannery on the Route d’Avignon, on the way out of Saint Rémy. He turned it into a Confectionery and exclusively produced crystallised fruit, fruit in syrup and jams, which he sold to professional Patissiers–Confectioners, who displayed them in their shop windows or used them for preparing patisserie. Pierre and Philippe, the fifth generation of the Lilamand family began to work together in 1998, opening a shop inside the factory in 2011. When the fruit arrives at the factory, it is sorted, manually of course, so that the quality and ripeness can be assessed and the fruit which cannot be crystallised can be removed. The melons, pears with stalks, and pineapple are all peeled. The oranges, lemons, grapefruit, kiwis and melons are cut into slices, as are the pineapples. The apricots are stoned and the strawberries, plums, figs, kumquats, clementines, etc. are merely rinsed. They are then soaked in brine, a precise combination of water and sulphur which stabilises the fruit and stops it ripening. This also allows the storage of large volumes of fruit which cannot be processed immediately and simultaneously, as well as the staggering of production, since that the main requirement is to have a sufficient volume of fruit to last until the next harvest, i.e. the following year, for all fruits. All the fruit is picked manually, using a large needle to make it easier for the syrup to penetrate into its centre later in the process. It is then blanched, which means that it is poured into a vat of clean water and boiled for the first time to soften its flesh and remove the fibres. This first, very gentle, contact requires great expertise on the part of the Confectioner. The fruit is then placed in syrup. The sufficiently softened fruit is rinsed in clean water. The sulphur evaporates during the boiling process. The next, very long, stage involves a series of boiling operations, interspersed with rest time, so that the fruit can recover; this process lasts three to four weeks. The fruit is boiled up to seven times, during which time osmosis occurs between the fruit and the syrup, which blend together until they are fully concentrated. The fruit and syrup are then poured into an earthenware jar, which is waiting under the cooking basins. And it is then, in an explosion of falling syrup, that burning, sticky drops are projected a distance of almost one metre and splash the confectioners, who continue their work without batting an eyelid, insensitive to this constant torture. After these laborious stages, a lot of the fruit is bruised and has to be sorted once again. The damaged fruit is removed and the rest is graded so that it is of similar size once packaged. After this manual sorting, the fruit is boiled one last time in the ‘final’ boiling operation, before being deliberately abandoned in its terracotta jar, soaking in its syrup in ‘fruitiers’, which are dark, warm rooms where it is stored for at least two months. The fruit is then drained; it is only when an order is received that the fruit is removed from the syrup in which it is soaking. The earthenware jars are poured into wicker baskets or perforated sieves placed on an earthenware jar which collects the syrup dripping through the mesh. The fruit, trapped in its wicker basket, can be packaged as it is, sticky and shiny, for patisserie ‘laboratories’ or it can undergo the ultimate soaking experience, namely glazing. To cover the fruit in sugar, which will protect it and reduce the sticky sensation, it is soaked one last time in a pure, concentrated sugar syrup. In its desire for excellence, the Confiserie Lilamand continues to glaze fruit by hand. At least four people are involved in this operation, which allows around 500 kg of fruit to be glazed during a working day. This seems an enormous amount, but is derisory when we consider that an automated machine with just two ‘operators’ could do it in one hour. It is this precision and drive that really convey the commitment to absolute quality, with no compromises allowed. It takes just over three months to reach the final stage, when the fruit, enhanced by its transformation, gives back everything nature had given it. Admittedly, it receives a helping hand from man, who is no more than a craftsman, working with the best that Provence has to offer. The pride of the Confiserie Lilamand remains the fact that it supplies the most famous ‘Maisons’ in France and Europe, such as Dalloyau and Verlet in Paris, Senequier in Saint Tropez and Wittamer in Brussels… (apologies to the others), and that people, anonymous or otherwise, but sharing with a love of good things, often travel great distances or make a detour to resupply, and thank them for existing. We have seen it written that Lilamand candied fruits are a national treasure and they are obviously keen to remain so. There is a shop, where you can discover colours and aromas that defy your imagination. Crystallised fruit is one of the oldest ways of preserving fruits. The first traces of this process date back to the 1st century A.D., when the Romans preserved fruits using honey. Crystallising fruit involves removing the water and acidity from the fruit and replacing them with sugar syrup. In Provence, fruits were first preserved by crystallisation in the Middle Ages. Crystallised fruits became very popular and were a great delicacy when Avignon became a Papal City. Like most Patissiers–Confectioners at the time, Marius Lilamand, who opened his Patisserie–Confectionery in the centre of Saint Rémy, opposite the Hôtel de Sade, in 1866, made all kinds of patisseries and chocolates, as well as crystallised fruits. In 1903, his son, Justin, bought an old tannery on the Route d’Avignon, on the way out of Saint Rémy. He turned it into a Confectionery and exclusively produced crystallised fruit, fruit in syrup and jams, which he sold to professional Patissiers–Confectioners, who displayed them in their shop windows or used them for preparing patisserie. Pierre and Philippe, the fifth generation of the Lilamand family began to work together in 1998, opening a shop inside the factory in 2011. When the fruit arrives at the factory, it is sorted, manually of course, so that the quality and ripeness can be assessed and the fruit which cannot be crystallised can be removed. The melons, pears with stalks, and pineapple are all peeled. The oranges, lemons, grapefruit, kiwis and melons are cut into slices, as are the pineapples. The apricots are stoned and the strawberries, plums, figs, kumquats, clementines, etc. are merely rinsed. They are then soaked in brine, a precise combination of water and sulphur which stabilises the fruit and stops it ripening. This also allows the storage of large volumes of fruit which cannot be processed immediately and simultaneously, as well as the staggering of production, since that the main requirement is to have a sufficient volume of fruit to last until the next harvest, i.e. the following year, for all fruits. All the fruit is picked manually, using a large needle to make it easier for the syrup to penetrate into its centre later in the process. It is then blanched, which means that it is poured into a vat of clean water and boiled for the first time to soften its flesh and remove the fibres. This first, very gentle, contact requires great expertise on the part of the Confectioner. The fruit is then placed in syrup. The sufficiently softened fruit is rinsed in clean water. The sulphur evaporates during the boiling process. The next, very long, stage involves a series of boiling operations, interspersed with rest time, so that the fruit can recover; this process lasts three to four weeks. The fruit is boiled up to seven times, during which time osmosis occurs between the fruit and the syrup, which blend together until they are fully concentrated. The fruit and syrup are then poured into an earthenware jar, which is waiting under the cooking basins. And it is then, in an explosion of falling syrup, that burning, sticky drops are projected a distance of almost one metre and splash the confectioners, who continue their work without batting an eyelid, insensitive to this constant torture. After these laborious stages, a lot of the fruit is bruised and has to be sorted once again. The damaged fruit is removed and the rest is graded so that it is of similar size once packaged. After this manual sorting, the fruit is boiled one last time in the ‘final’ boiling operation, before being deliberately abandoned in its terracotta jar, soaking in its syrup in ‘fruitiers’, which are dark, warm rooms where it is stored for at least two months. The fruit is then drained; it is only when an order is received that the fruit is removed from the syrup in which it is soaking. The earthenware jars are poured into wicker baskets or perforated sieves placed on an earthenware jar which collects the syrup dripping through the mesh. The fruit, trapped in its wicker basket, can be packaged as it is, sticky and shiny, for patisserie ‘laboratories’ or it can undergo the ultimate soaking experience, namely glazing. To cover the fruit in sugar, which will protect it and reduce the sticky sensation, it is soaked one last time in a pure, concentrated sugar syrup. In its desire for excellence, the Confiserie Lilamand continues to glaze fruit by hand. At least four people are involved in this operation, which allows around 500 kg of fruit to be glazed during a working day. This seems an enormous amount, but is derisory when we consider that an automated machine with just two ‘operators’ could do it in one hour. It is this precision and drive that really convey the commitment to absolute quality, with no compromises allowed. It takes just over three months to reach the final stage, when the fruit, enhanced by its transformation, gives back everything nature had given it. Admittedly, it receives a helping hand from man, who is no more than a craftsman, working with the best that Provence has to offer. The pride of the Confiserie Lilamand remains the fact that it supplies the most famous ‘Maisons’ in France and Europe, such as Dalloyau and Verlet in Paris, Senequier in Saint Tropez and Wittamer in Brussels… (apologies to the others), and that people, anonymous or otherwise, but sharing with a love of good things, often travel great distances or make a detour to resupply, and thank them for existing. We have seen it written that Lilamand candied fruits are a national treasure and they are obviously keen to remain so. There is a shop, where you can discover colours and aromas that defy your imagination. Crystallised fruit is one of the oldest ways of preserving fruits. The first traces of this process date back to the 1st century A.D., when the Romans preserved fruits using honey. Crystallising fruit involves removing the water and acidity from the fruit and replacing them with sugar syrup. In Provence, fruits were first preserved by crystallisation in the Middle Ages. Crystallised fruits became very popular and were a great delicacy when Avignon became a Papal City. Like most Patissiers–Confectioners at the time, Marius Lilamand, who opened his Patisserie–Confectionery in the centre of Saint Rémy, opposite the Hôtel de Sade, in 1866, made all kinds of patisseries and chocolates, as well as crystallised fruits. In 1903, his son, Justin, bought an old tannery on the Route d’Avignon, on the way out of Saint Rémy. He turned it into a Confectionery and exclusively produced crystallised fruit, fruit in syrup and jams, which he sold to professional Patissiers–Confectioners, who displayed them in their shop windows or used them for preparing patisserie. Pierre and Philippe, the fifth generation of the Lilamand family began to work together in 1998, opening a shop inside the factory in 2011. When the fruit arrives at the factory, it is sorted, manually of course, so that the quality and ripeness can be assessed and the fruit which cannot be crystallised can be removed. The melons, pears with stalks, and pineapple are all peeled. The oranges, lemons, grapefruit, kiwis and melons are cut into slices, as are the pineapples. The apricots are stoned and the strawberries, plums, figs, kumquats, clementines, etc. are merely rinsed. They are then soaked in brine, a precise combination of water and sulphur which stabilises the fruit and stops it ripening. This also allows the storage of large volumes of fruit which cannot be processed immediately and simultaneously, as well as the staggering of production, since that the main requirement is to have a sufficient volume of fruit to last until the next harvest, i.e. the following year, for all fruits. All the fruit is picked manually, using a large needle to make it easier for the syrup to penetrate into its centre later in the process. It is then blanched, which means that it is poured into a vat of clean water and boiled for the first time to soften its flesh and remove the fibres. This first, very gentle, contact requires great expertise on the part of the Confectioner. The fruit is then placed in syrup. The sufficiently softened fruit is rinsed in clean water. The sulphur evaporates during the boiling process. The next, very long, stage involves a series of boiling operations, interspersed with rest time, so that the fruit can recover; this process lasts three to four weeks. The fruit is boiled up to seven times, during which time osmosis occurs between the fruit and the syrup, which blend together until they are fully concentrated. The fruit and syrup are then poured into an earthenware jar, which is waiting under the cooking basins. And it is then, in an explosion of falling syrup, that burning, sticky drops are projected a distance of almost one metre and splash the confectioners, who continue their work without batting an eyelid, insensitive to this constant torture. After these laborious stages, a lot of the fruit is bruised and has to be sorted once again. The damaged fruit is removed and the rest is graded so that it is of similar size once packaged. After this manual sorting, the fruit is boiled one last time in the ‘final’ boiling operation, before being deliberately abandoned in its terracotta jar, soaking in its syrup in ‘fruitiers’, which are dark, warm rooms where it is stored for at least two months. The fruit is then drained; it is only when an order is received that the fruit is removed from the syrup in which it is soaking. The earthenware jars are poured into wicker baskets or perforated sieves placed on an earthenware jar which collects the syrup dripping through the mesh. The fruit, trapped in its wicker basket, can be packaged as it is, sticky and shiny, for patisserie ‘laboratories’ or it can undergo the ultimate soaking experience, namely glazing. To cover the fruit in sugar, which will protect it and reduce the sticky sensation, it is soaked one last time in a pure, concentrated sugar syrup. In its desire for excellence, the Confiserie Lilamand continues to glaze fruit by hand. At least four people are involved in this operation, which allows around 500 kg of fruit to be glazed during a working day. This seems an enormous amount, but is derisory when we consider that an automated machine with just two ‘operators’ could do it in one hour. It is this precision and drive that really convey the commitment to absolute quality, with no compromises allowed. It takes just over three months to reach the final stage, when the fruit, enhanced by its transformation, gives back everything nature had given it. Admittedly, it receives a helping hand from man, who is no more than a craftsman, working with the best that Provence has to offer. The pride of the Confiserie Lilamand remains the fact that it supplies the most famous ‘Maisons’ in France and Europe, such as Dalloyau and Verlet in Paris, Senequier in Saint Tropez and Wittamer in Brussels… (apologies to the others), and that people, anonymous or otherwise, but sharing with a love of good things, often travel great distances or make a detour to resupply, and thank them for existing. We have seen it written that Lilamand candied fruits are a national treasure and they are obviously keen to remain so. There is a shop, where you can discover colours and aromas that defy your imagination. Crystallised fruit is one of the oldest ways of preserving fruits. The first traces of this process date back to the 1st century A.D., when the Romans preserved fruits using honey. Crystallising fruit involves removing the water and acidity from the fruit and replacing them with sugar syrup. In Provence, fruits were first preserved by crystallisation in the Middle Ages. Crystallised fruits became very popular and were a great delicacy when Avignon became a Papal City. Like most Patissiers–Confectioners at the time, Marius Lilamand, who opened his Patisserie–Confectionery in the centre of Saint Rémy, opposite the Hôtel de Sade, in 1866, made all kinds of patisseries and chocolates, as well as crystallised fruits. In 1903, his son, Justin, bought an old tannery on the Route d’Avignon, on the way out of Saint Rémy. He turned it into a Confectionery and exclusively produced crystallised fruit, fruit in syrup and jams, which he sold to professional Patissiers–Confectioners, who displayed them in their shop windows or used them for preparing patisserie. Pierre and Philippe, the fifth generation of the Lilamand family began to work together in 1998, opening a shop inside the factory in 2011. When the fruit arrives at the factory, it is sorted, manually of course, so that the quality and ripeness can be assessed and the fruit which cannot be crystallised can be removed. The melons, pears with stalks, and pineapple are all peeled. The oranges, lemons, grapefruit, kiwis and melons are cut into slices, as are the pineapples. The apricots are stoned and the strawberries, plums, figs, kumquats, clementines, etc. are merely rinsed. They are then soaked in brine, a precise combination of water and sulphur which stabilises the fruit and stops it ripening. This also allows the storage of large volumes of fruit which cannot be processed immediately and simultaneously, as well as the staggering of production, since that the main requirement is to have a sufficient volume of fruit to last until the next harvest, i.e. the following year, for all fruits. All the fruit is picked manually, using a large needle to make it easier for the syrup to penetrate into its centre later in the process. It is then blanched, which means that it is poured into a vat of clean water and boiled for the first time to soften its flesh and remove the fibres. This first, very gentle, contact requires great expertise on the part of the Confectioner. The fruit is then placed in syrup. The sufficiently softened fruit is rinsed in clean water. The sulphur evaporates during the boiling process. The next, very long, stage involves a series of boiling operations, interspersed with rest time, so that the fruit can recover; this process lasts three to four weeks. The fruit is boiled up to seven times, during which time osmosis occurs between the fruit and the syrup, which blend together until they are fully concentrated. The fruit and syrup are then poured into an earthenware jar, which is waiting under the cooking basins. And it is then, in an explosion of falling syrup, that burning, sticky drops are projected a distance of almost one metre and splash the confectioners, who continue their work without batting an eyelid, insensitive to this constant torture. After these laborious stages, a lot of the fruit is bruised and has to be sorted once again. The damaged fruit is removed and the rest is graded so that it is of similar size once packaged. After this manual sorting, the fruit is boiled one last time in the ‘final’ boiling operation, before being deliberately abandoned in its terracotta jar, soaking in its syrup in ‘fruitiers’, which are dark, warm rooms where it is stored for at least two months. The fruit is then drained; it is only when an order is received that the fruit is removed from the syrup in which it is soaking. The earthenware jars are poured into wicker baskets or perforated sieves placed on an earthenware jar which collects the syrup dripping through the mesh. The fruit, trapped in its wicker basket, can be packaged as it is, sticky and shiny, for patisserie ‘laboratories’ or it can undergo the ultimate soaking experience, namely glazing. To cover the fruit in sugar, which will protect it and reduce the sticky sensation, it is soaked one last time in a pure, concentrated sugar syrup. In its desire for excellence, the Confiserie Lilamand continues to glaze fruit by hand. At least four people are involved in this operation, which allows around 500 kg of fruit to be glazed during a working day. This seems an enormous amount, but is derisory when we consider that an automated machine with just two ‘operators’ could do it in one hour. It is this precision and drive that really convey the commitment to absolute quality, with no compromises allowed. It takes just over three months to reach the final stage, when the fruit, enhanced by its transformation, gives back everything nature had given it. Admittedly, it receives a helping hand from man, who is no more than a craftsman, working with the best that Provence has to offer. The pride of the Confiserie Lilamand remains the fact that it supplies the most famous ‘Maisons’ in France and Europe, such as Dalloyau and Verlet in Paris, Senequier in Saint Tropez and Wittamer in Brussels… (apologies to the others), and that people, anonymous or otherwise, but sharing with a love of good things, often travel great distances or make a detour to resupply, and thank them for existing. We have seen it written that Lilamand candied fruits are a national treasure and they are obviously keen to remain so. There is a shop, where you can discover colours and aromas that defy your imagination. Crystallised fruit is one of the oldest ways of preserving fruits. The first traces of this process date back to the 1st century A.D., when the Romans preserved fruits using honey. Crystallising fruit involves removing the water and acidity from the fruit and replacing them with sugar syrup. In Provence, fruits were first preserved by crystallisation in the Middle Ages. Crystallised fruits became very popular and were a great delicacy when Avignon became a Papal City. Like most Patissiers–Confectioners at the time, Marius Lilamand, who opened his Patisserie–Confectionery in the centre of Saint Rémy, opposite the Hôtel de Sade, in 1866, made all kinds of patisseries and chocolates, as well as crystallised fruits. In 1903, his son, Justin, bought an old tannery on the Route d’Avignon, on the way out of Saint Rémy. He turned it into a Confectionery and exclusively produced crystallised fruit, fruit in syrup and jams, which he sold to professional Patissiers–Confectioners, who displayed them in their shop windows or used them for preparing patisserie. Pierre and Philippe, the fifth generation of the Lilamand family began to work together in 1998, opening a shop inside the factory in 2011. When the fruit arrives at the factory, it is sorted, manually of course, so that the quality and ripeness can be assessed and the fruit which cannot be crystallised can be removed. The melons, pears with stalks, and pineapple are all peeled. The oranges, lemons, grapefruit, kiwis and melons are cut into slices, as are the pineapples. The apricots are stoned and the strawberries, plums, figs, kumquats, clementines, etc. are merely rinsed. They are then soaked in brine, a precise combination of water and sulphur which stabilises the fruit and stops it ripening. This also allows the storage of large volumes of fruit which cannot be processed immediately and simultaneously, as well as the staggering of production, since that the main requirement is to have a sufficient volume of fruit to last until the next harvest, i.e. the following year, for all fruits. All the fruit is picked manually, using a large needle to make it easier for the syrup to penetrate into its centre later in the process. It is then blanched, which means that it is poured into a vat of clean water and boiled for the first time to soften its flesh and remove the fibres. This first, very gentle, contact requires great expertise on the part of the Confectioner. The fruit is then placed in syrup. The sufficiently softened fruit is rinsed in clean water. The sulphur evaporates during the boiling process. The next, very long, stage involves a series of boiling operations, interspersed with rest time, so that the fruit can recover; this process lasts three to four weeks. The fruit is boiled up to seven times, during which time osmosis occurs between the fruit and the syrup, which blend together until they are fully concentrated. The fruit and syrup are then poured into an earthenware jar, which is waiting under the cooking basins. And it is then, in an explosion of falling syrup, that burning, sticky drops are projected a distance of almost one metre and splash the confectioners, who continue their work without batting an eyelid, insensitive to this constant torture. After these laborious stages, a lot of the fruit is bruised and has to be sorted once again. The damaged fruit is removed and the rest is graded so that it is of similar size once packaged. After this manual sorting, the fruit is boiled one last time in the ‘final’ boiling operation, before being deliberately abandoned in its terracotta jar, soaking in its syrup in ‘fruitiers’, which are dark, warm rooms where it is stored for at least two months. The fruit is then drained; it is only when an order is received that the fruit is removed from the syrup in which it is soaking. The earthenware jars are poured into wicker baskets or perforated sieves placed on an earthenware jar which collects the syrup dripping through the mesh. The fruit, trapped in its wicker basket, can be packaged as it is, sticky and shiny, for patisserie ‘laboratories’ or it can undergo the ultimate soaking experience, namely glazing. To cover the fruit in sugar, which will protect it and reduce the sticky sensation, it is soaked one last time in a pure, concentrated sugar syrup. In its desire for excellence, the Confiserie Lilamand continues to glaze fruit by hand. At least four people are involved in this operation, which allows around 500 kg of fruit to be glazed during a working day. This seems an enormous amount, but is derisory when we consider that an automated machine with just two ‘operators’ could do it in one hour. It is this precision and drive that really convey the commitment to absolute quality, with no compromises allowed. It takes just over three months to reach the final stage, when the fruit, enhanced by its transformation, gives back everything nature had given it. Admittedly, it receives a helping hand from man, who is no more than a craftsman, working with the best that Provence has to offer. The pride of the Confiserie Lilamand remains the fact that it supplies the most famous ‘Maisons’ in France and Europe, such as Dalloyau and Verlet in Paris, Senequier in Saint Tropez and Wittamer in Brussels… (apologies to the others), and that people, anonymous or otherwise, but sharing with a love of good things, often travel great distances or make a detour to resupply, and thank them for existing. We have seen it written that Lilamand candied fruits are a national treasure and they are obviously keen to remain so. There is a shop, where you can discover colours and aromas that defy your imagination. Crystallised fruit is one of the oldest ways of preserving fruits. The first traces of this process date back to the 1st century A.D., when the Romans preserved fruits using honey. Crystallising fruit involves removing the water and acidity from the fruit and replacing them with sugar syrup. In Provence, fruits were first preserved by crystallisation in the Middle Ages. Crystallised fruits became very popular and were a great delicacy when Avignon became a Papal City. Like most Patissiers–Confectioners at the time, Marius Lilamand, who opened his Patisserie–Confectionery in the centre of Saint Rémy, opposite the Hôtel de Sade, in 1866, made all kinds of patisseries and chocolates, as well as crystallised fruits. In 1903, his son, Justin, bought an old tannery on the Route d’Avignon, on the way out of Saint Rémy. He turned it into a Confectionery and exclusively produced crystallised fruit, fruit in syrup and jams, which he sold to professional Patissiers–Confectioners, who displayed them in their shop windows or used them for preparing patisserie. Pierre and Philippe, the fifth generation of the Lilamand family began to work together in 1998, opening a shop inside the factory in 2011. When the fruit arrives at the factory, it is sorted, manually of course, so that the quality and ripeness can be assessed and the fruit which cannot be crystallised can be removed. The melons, pears with stalks, and pineapple are all peeled. The oranges, lemons, grapefruit, kiwis and melons are cut into slices, as are the pineapples. The apricots are stoned and the strawberries, plums, figs, kumquats, clementines, etc. are merely rinsed. They are then soaked in brine, a precise combination of water and sulphur which stabilises the fruit and stops it ripening. This also allows the storage of large volumes of fruit which cannot be processed immediately and simultaneously, as well as the staggering of production, since that the main requirement is to have a sufficient volume of fruit to last until the next harvest, i.e. the following year, for all fruits. All the fruit is picked manually, using a large needle to make it easier for the syrup to penetrate into its centre later in the process. It is then blanched, which means that it is poured into a vat of clean water and boiled for the first time to soften its flesh and remove the fibres. This first, very gentle, contact requires great expertise on the part of the Confectioner. The fruit is then placed in syrup. The sufficiently softened fruit is rinsed in clean water. The sulphur evaporates during the boiling process. The next, very long, stage involves a series of boiling operations, interspersed with rest time, so that the fruit can recover; this process lasts three to four weeks. The fruit is boiled up to seven times, during which time osmosis occurs between the fruit and the syrup, which blend together until they are fully concentrated. The fruit and syrup are then poured into an earthenware jar, which is waiting under the cooking basins. And it is then, in an explosion of falling syrup, that burning, sticky drops are projected a distance of almost one metre and splash the confectioners, who continue their work without batting an eyelid, insensitive to this constant torture. After these laborious stages, a lot of the fruit is bruised and has to be sorted once again. The damaged fruit is removed and the rest is graded so that it is of similar size once packaged. After this manual sorting, the fruit is boiled one last time in the ‘final’ boiling operation, before being deliberately abandoned in its terracotta jar, soaking in its syrup in ‘fruitiers’, which are dark, warm rooms where it is stored for at least two months. The fruit is then drained; it is only when an order is received that the fruit is removed from the syrup in which it is soaking. The earthenware jars are poured into wicker baskets or perforated sieves placed on an earthenware jar which collects the syrup dripping through the mesh. The fruit, trapped in its wicker basket, can be packaged as it is, sticky and shiny, for patisserie ‘laboratories’ or it can undergo the ultimate soaking experience, namely glazing. To cover the fruit in sugar, which will protect it and reduce the sticky sensation, it is soaked one last time in a pure, concentrated sugar syrup. In its desire for excellence, the Confiserie Lilamand continues to glaze fruit by hand. At least four people are involved in this operation, which allows around 500 kg of fruit to be glazed during a working day. This seems an enormous amount, but is derisory when we consider that an automated machine with just two ‘operators’ could do it in one hour. It is this precision and drive that really convey the commitment to absolute quality, with no compromises allowed. It takes just over three months to reach the final stage, when the fruit, enhanced by its transformation, gives back everything nature had given it. Admittedly, it receives a helping hand from man, who is no more than a craftsman, working with the best that Provence has to offer. The pride of the Confiserie Lilamand remains the fact that it supplies the most famous ‘Maisons’ in France and Europe, such as Dalloyau and Verlet in Paris, Senequier in Saint Tropez and Wittamer in Brussels… (apologies to the others), and that people, anonymous or otherwise, but sharing with a love of good things, often travel great distances or make a detour to resupply, and thank them for existing. We have seen it written that Lilamand candied fruits are a national treasure and they are obviously keen to remain so. There is a shop, where you can discover colours and aromas that defy your imagination. Crystallised fruit is one of the oldest ways of preserving fruits. The first traces of this process date back to the 1st century A.D., when the Romans preserved fruits using honey. Crystallising fruit involves removing the water and acidity from the fruit and replacing them with sugar syrup. In Provence, fruits were first preserved by crystallisation in the Middle Ages. Crystallised fruits became very popular and were a great delicacy when Avignon became a Papal City. Like most Patissiers–Confectioners at the time, Marius Lilamand, who opened his Patisserie–Confectionery in the centre of Saint Rémy, opposite the Hôtel de Sade, in 1866, made all kinds of patisseries and chocolates, as well as crystallised fruits. In 1903, his son, Justin, bought an old tannery on the Route d’Avignon, on the way out of Saint Rémy. He turned it into a Confectionery and exclusively produced crystallised fruit, fruit in syrup and jams, which he sold to professional Patissiers–Confectioners, who displayed them in their shop windows or used them for preparing patisserie. Pierre and Philippe, the fifth generation of the Lilamand family began to work together in 1998, opening a shop inside the factory in 2011. When the fruit arrives at the factory, it is sorted, manually of course, so that the quality and ripeness can be assessed and the fruit which cannot be crystallised can be removed. The melons, pears with stalks, and pineapple are all peeled. The oranges, lemons, grapefruit, kiwis and melons are cut into slices, as are the pineapples. The apricots are stoned and the strawberries, plums, figs, kumquats, clementines, etc. are merely rinsed. They are then soaked in brine, a precise combination of water and sulphur which stabilises the fruit and stops it ripening. This also allows the storage of large volumes of fruit which cannot be processed immediately and simultaneously, as well as the staggering of production, since that the main requirement is to have a sufficient volume of fruit to last until the next harvest, i.e. the following year, for all fruits. All the fruit is picked manually, using a large needle to make it easier for the syrup to penetrate into its centre later in the process. It is then blanched, which means that it is poured into a vat of clean water and boiled for the first time to soften its flesh and remove the fibres. This first, very gentle, contact requires great expertise on the part of the Confectioner. The fruit is then placed in syrup. The sufficiently softened fruit is rinsed in clean water. The sulphur evaporates during the boiling process. The next, very long, stage involves a series of boiling operations, interspersed with rest time, so that the fruit can recover; this process lasts three to four weeks. The fruit is boiled up to seven times, during which time osmosis occurs between the fruit and the syrup, which blend together until they are fully concentrated. The fruit and syrup are then poured into an earthenware jar, which is waiting under the cooking basins. And it is then, in an explosion of falling syrup, that burning, sticky drops are projected a distance of almost one metre and splash the confectioners, who continue their work without batting an eyelid, insensitive to this constant torture. After these laborious stages, a lot of the fruit is bruised and has to be sorted once again. The damaged fruit is removed and the rest is graded so that it is of similar size once packaged. After this manual sorting, the fruit is boiled one last time in the ‘final’ boiling operation, before being deliberately abandoned in its terracotta jar, soaking in its syrup in ‘fruitiers’, which are dark, warm rooms where it is stored for at least two months. The fruit is then drained; it is only when an order is received that the fruit is removed from the syrup in which it is soaking. The earthenware jars are poured into wicker baskets or perforated sieves placed on an earthenware jar which collects the syrup dripping through the mesh. The fruit, trapped in its wicker basket, can be packaged as it is, sticky and shiny, for patisserie ‘laboratories’ or it can undergo the ultimate soaking experience, namely glazing. To cover the fruit in sugar, which will protect it and reduce the sticky sensation, it is soaked one last time in a pure, concentrated sugar syrup. In its desire for excellence, the Confiserie Lilamand continues to glaze fruit by hand. At least four people are involved in this operation, which allows around 500 kg of fruit to be glazed during a working day. This seems an enormous amount, but is derisory when we consider that an automated machine with just two ‘operators’ could do it in one hour. It is this precision and drive that really convey the commitment to absolute quality, with no compromises allowed. It takes just over three months to reach the final stage, when the fruit, enhanced by its transformation, gives back everything nature had given it. Admittedly, it receives a helping hand from man, who is no more than a craftsman, working with the best that Provence has to offer. The pride of the Confiserie Lilamand remains the fact that it supplies the most famous ‘Maisons’ in France and Europe, such as Dalloyau and Verlet in Paris, Senequier in Saint Tropez and Wittamer in Brussels… (apologies to the others), and that people, anonymous or otherwise, but sharing with a love of good things, often travel great distances or make a detour to resupply, and thank them for existing. We have seen it written that Lilamand candied fruits are a national treasure and they are obviously keen to remain so. There is a shop, where you can discover colours and aromas that defy your imagination.


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