Alpilles

    Fontvieille village

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    The discovery of underground burial chambers indicates that humans were present during protohistory between 5000 and 2800 BC. The settlement of Fontvieille does not appear officially until the 18th century, two years after the start of the French Revolution. The use of stone was to become one of the main threads in our history. During the Roman period, the Celtic-Ligurian people of Arelate (modern-day Arles) supported Jules Caesar against Pompey. As a token of thanks, their city became a Roman colony, for which stone was needed. As our site was close-by and easily accessible, an open pit (or Roman) quarry was established 3 km from the centre of the current village. The first people to settle in the area were quarrymen, who remained there over time, only to move according to need around the village. This is how the town of Arelate was expanded, the Roman aqueduct and watermill at Barbegal were built and, in the Middle Ages, the Montmajour Abbey (not far from Mt Cordes) was constructed. The conflicts between the lords of Les Baux-de-Provence and the monks of Montmajour Abbey led to the construction of an observation and defensive tower (the 14th-century Tour des Abbés). The population gradually settled around the tower, encouraged at the same time by a water source protected by a small structure that they called the ‘old fountain’ (12th century). The farming community developed to provide food for the families of the stone-cutters, leading to two major but distinct guilds: quarrymen and farmers. Whilst the first oil mills appeared around the 16th century, it was not until the late 18th century that the earliest windmill, the moulin Sourdon, saw the light of day. The history of Fontvieille really took off after the French Revolution, when orders for stone began to increase. But the second half of the 19th century saw even greater growth: Fontvieille stone was transported across continents and oceans as it was suitable for a specific type of architecture – the Haussmannian style. The population of our village grew in response to these substantial requests from across the world, resulting in the emergence of three further windmills: Ramet, Tissot-Avon and Ribet. Sometimes history takes on the most poetic and artistic dimensions: the poet and writer Alphonse Daudet came to visit his cousin Louis Daudet at the Château de Montauban, the home of his parents-in-law. Daudet was so charmed by the village and the welcome he received that he came back regularly over the thirty years of his short life. Léo Lelée, famous for painting the women of Arles, later set up his easel in the small streets and hills of the village. Another painter of renown, Carl Liner, settled in the famous Tour des Abbés. The best way to discover the history of the village is on a guided tour run by the Tourist Office. The discovery of underground burial chambers indicates that humans were present during protohistory between 5000 and 2800 BC. The settlement of Fontvieille does not appear officially until the 18th century, two years after the start of the French Revolution. The use of stone was to become one of the main threads in our history. During the Roman period, the Celtic-Ligurian people of Arelate (modern-day Arles) supported Jules Caesar against Pompey. As a token of thanks, their city became a Roman colony, for which stone was needed. As our site was close-by and easily accessible, an open pit (or Roman) quarry was established 3 km from the centre of the current village. The first people to settle in the area were quarrymen, who remained there over time, only to move according to need around the village. This is how the town of Arelate was expanded, the Roman aqueduct and watermill at Barbegal were built and, in the Middle Ages, the Montmajour Abbey (not far from Mt Cordes) was constructed. The conflicts between the lords of Les Baux-de-Provence and the monks of Montmajour Abbey led to the construction of an observation and defensive tower (the 14th-century Tour des Abbés). The population gradually settled around the tower, encouraged at the same time by a water source protected by a small structure that they called the ‘old fountain’ (12th century). The farming community developed to provide food for the families of the stone-cutters, leading to two major but distinct guilds: quarrymen and farmers. Whilst the first oil mills appeared around the 16th century, it was not until the late 18th century that the earliest windmill, the moulin Sourdon, saw the light of day. The history of Fontvieille really took off after the French Revolution, when orders for stone began to increase. But the second half of the 19th century saw even greater growth: Fontvieille stone was transported across continents and oceans as it was suitable for a specific type of architecture – the Haussmannian style. The population of our village grew in response to these substantial requests from across the world, resulting in the emergence of three further windmills: Ramet, Tissot-Avon and Ribet. Sometimes history takes on the most poetic and artistic dimensions: the poet and writer Alphonse Daudet came to visit his cousin Louis Daudet at the Château de Montauban, the home of his parents-in-law. Daudet was so charmed by the village and the welcome he received that he came back regularly over the thirty years of his short life. Léo Lelée, famous for painting the women of Arles, later set up his easel in the small streets and hills of the village. Another painter of renown, Carl Liner, settled in the famous Tour des Abbés. The best way to discover the history of the village is on a guided tour run by the Tourist Office. The discovery of underground burial chambers indicates that humans were present during protohistory between 5000 and 2800 BC. The settlement of Fontvieille does not appear officially until the 18th century, two years after the start of the French Revolution. The use of stone was to become one of the main threads in our history. During the Roman period, the Celtic-Ligurian people of Arelate (modern-day Arles) supported Jules Caesar against Pompey. As a token of thanks, their city became a Roman colony, for which stone was needed. As our site was close-by and easily accessible, an open pit (or Roman) quarry was established 3 km from the centre of the current village. The first people to settle in the area were quarrymen, who remained there over time, only to move according to need around the village. This is how the town of Arelate was expanded, the Roman aqueduct and watermill at Barbegal were built and, in the Middle Ages, the Montmajour Abbey (not far from Mt Cordes) was constructed. The conflicts between the lords of Les Baux-de-Provence and the monks of Montmajour Abbey led to the construction of an observation and defensive tower (the 14th-century Tour des Abbés). The population gradually settled around the tower, encouraged at the same time by a water source protected by a small structure that they called the ‘old fountain’ (12th century). The farming community developed to provide food for the families of the stone-cutters, leading to two major but distinct guilds: quarrymen and farmers. Whilst the first oil mills appeared around the 16th century, it was not until the late 18th century that the earliest windmill, the moulin Sourdon, saw the light of day. The history of Fontvieille really took off after the French Revolution, when orders for stone began to increase. But the second half of the 19th century saw even greater growth: Fontvieille stone was transported across continents and oceans as it was suitable for a specific type of architecture – the Haussmannian style. The population of our village grew in response to these substantial requests from across the world, resulting in the emergence of three further windmills: Ramet, Tissot-Avon and Ribet. Sometimes history takes on the most poetic and artistic dimensions: the poet and writer Alphonse Daudet came to visit his cousin Louis Daudet at the Château de Montauban, the home of his parents-in-law. Daudet was so charmed by the village and the welcome he received that he came back regularly over the thirty years of his short life. Léo Lelée, famous for painting the women of Arles, later set up his easel in the small streets and hills of the village. Another painter of renown, Carl Liner, settled in the famous Tour des Abbés. The best way to discover the history of the village is on a guided tour run by the Tourist Office. The discovery of underground burial chambers indicates that humans were present during protohistory between 5000 and 2800 BC. The settlement of Fontvieille does not appear officially until the 18th century, two years after the start of the French Revolution. The use of stone was to become one of the main threads in our history. During the Roman period, the Celtic-Ligurian people of Arelate (modern-day Arles) supported Jules Caesar against Pompey. As a token of thanks, their city became a Roman colony, for which stone was needed. As our site was close-by and easily accessible, an open pit (or Roman) quarry was established 3 km from the centre of the current village. The first people to settle in the area were quarrymen, who remained there over time, only to move according to need around the village. This is how the town of Arelate was expanded, the Roman aqueduct and watermill at Barbegal were built and, in the Middle Ages, the Montmajour Abbey (not far from Mt Cordes) was constructed. The conflicts between the lords of Les Baux-de-Provence and the monks of Montmajour Abbey led to the construction of an observation and defensive tower (the 14th-century Tour des Abbés). The population gradually settled around the tower, encouraged at the same time by a water source protected by a small structure that they called the ‘old fountain’ (12th century). The farming community developed to provide food for the families of the stone-cutters, leading to two major but distinct guilds: quarrymen and farmers. Whilst the first oil mills appeared around the 16th century, it was not until the late 18th century that the earliest windmill, the moulin Sourdon, saw the light of day. The history of Fontvieille really took off after the French Revolution, when orders for stone began to increase. But the second half of the 19th century saw even greater growth: Fontvieille stone was transported across continents and oceans as it was suitable for a specific type of architecture – the Haussmannian style. The population of our village grew in response to these substantial requests from across the world, resulting in the emergence of three further windmills: Ramet, Tissot-Avon and Ribet. Sometimes history takes on the most poetic and artistic dimensions: the poet and writer Alphonse Daudet came to visit his cousin Louis Daudet at the Château de Montauban, the home of his parents-in-law. Daudet was so charmed by the village and the welcome he received that he came back regularly over the thirty years of his short life. Léo Lelée, famous for painting the women of Arles, later set up his easel in the small streets and hills of the village. Another painter of renown, Carl Liner, settled in the famous Tour des Abbés. The best way to discover the history of the village is on a guided tour run by the Tourist Office. The discovery of underground burial chambers indicates that humans were present during protohistory between 5000 and 2800 BC. The settlement of Fontvieille does not appear officially until the 18th century, two years after the start of the French Revolution. The use of stone was to become one of the main threads in our history. During the Roman period, the Celtic-Ligurian people of Arelate (modern-day Arles) supported Jules Caesar against Pompey. As a token of thanks, their city became a Roman colony, for which stone was needed. As our site was close-by and easily accessible, an open pit (or Roman) quarry was established 3 km from the centre of the current village. The first people to settle in the area were quarrymen, who remained there over time, only to move according to need around the village. This is how the town of Arelate was expanded, the Roman aqueduct and watermill at Barbegal were built and, in the Middle Ages, the Montmajour Abbey (not far from Mt Cordes) was constructed. The conflicts between the lords of Les Baux-de-Provence and the monks of Montmajour Abbey led to the construction of an observation and defensive tower (the 14th-century Tour des Abbés). The population gradually settled around the tower, encouraged at the same time by a water source protected by a small structure that they called the ‘old fountain’ (12th century). The farming community developed to provide food for the families of the stone-cutters, leading to two major but distinct guilds: quarrymen and farmers. Whilst the first oil mills appeared around the 16th century, it was not until the late 18th century that the earliest windmill, the moulin Sourdon, saw the light of day. The history of Fontvieille really took off after the French Revolution, when orders for stone began to increase. But the second half of the 19th century saw even greater growth: Fontvieille stone was transported across continents and oceans as it was suitable for a specific type of architecture – the Haussmannian style. The population of our village grew in response to these substantial requests from across the world, resulting in the emergence of three further windmills: Ramet, Tissot-Avon and Ribet. Sometimes history takes on the most poetic and artistic dimensions: the poet and writer Alphonse Daudet came to visit his cousin Louis Daudet at the Château de Montauban, the home of his parents-in-law. Daudet was so charmed by the village and the welcome he received that he came back regularly over the thirty years of his short life. Léo Lelée, famous for painting the women of Arles, later set up his easel in the small streets and hills of the village. Another painter of renown, Carl Liner, settled in the famous Tour des Abbés. The best way to discover the history of the village is on a guided tour run by the Tourist Office. The discovery of underground burial chambers indicates that humans were present during protohistory between 5000 and 2800 BC. The settlement of Fontvieille does not appear officially until the 18th century, two years after the start of the French Revolution. The use of stone was to become one of the main threads in our history. During the Roman period, the Celtic-Ligurian people of Arelate (modern-day Arles) supported Jules Caesar against Pompey. As a token of thanks, their city became a Roman colony, for which stone was needed. As our site was close-by and easily accessible, an open pit (or Roman) quarry was established 3 km from the centre of the current village. The first people to settle in the area were quarrymen, who remained there over time, only to move according to need around the village. This is how the town of Arelate was expanded, the Roman aqueduct and watermill at Barbegal were built and, in the Middle Ages, the Montmajour Abbey (not far from Mt Cordes) was constructed. The conflicts between the lords of Les Baux-de-Provence and the monks of Montmajour Abbey led to the construction of an observation and defensive tower (the 14th-century Tour des Abbés). The population gradually settled around the tower, encouraged at the same time by a water source protected by a small structure that they called the ‘old fountain’ (12th century). The farming community developed to provide food for the families of the stone-cutters, leading to two major but distinct guilds: quarrymen and farmers. Whilst the first oil mills appeared around the 16th century, it was not until the late 18th century that the earliest windmill, the moulin Sourdon, saw the light of day. The history of Fontvieille really took off after the French Revolution, when orders for stone began to increase. But the second half of the 19th century saw even greater growth: Fontvieille stone was transported across continents and oceans as it was suitable for a specific type of architecture – the Haussmannian style. The population of our village grew in response to these substantial requests from across the world, resulting in the emergence of three further windmills: Ramet, Tissot-Avon and Ribet. Sometimes history takes on the most poetic and artistic dimensions: the poet and writer Alphonse Daudet came to visit his cousin Louis Daudet at the Château de Montauban, the home of his parents-in-law. Daudet was so charmed by the village and the welcome he received that he came back regularly over the thirty years of his short life. Léo Lelée, famous for painting the women of Arles, later set up his easel in the small streets and hills of the village. Another painter of renown, Carl Liner, settled in the famous Tour des Abbés. The best way to discover the history of the village is on a guided tour run by the Tourist Office. The discovery of underground burial chambers indicates that humans were present during protohistory between 5000 and 2800 BC. The settlement of Fontvieille does not appear officially until the 18th century, two years after the start of the French Revolution. The use of stone was to become one of the main threads in our history. During the Roman period, the Celtic-Ligurian people of Arelate (modern-day Arles) supported Jules Caesar against Pompey. As a token of thanks, their city became a Roman colony, for which stone was needed. As our site was close-by and easily accessible, an open pit (or Roman) quarry was established 3 km from the centre of the current village. The first people to settle in the area were quarrymen, who remained there over time, only to move according to need around the village. This is how the town of Arelate was expanded, the Roman aqueduct and watermill at Barbegal were built and, in the Middle Ages, the Montmajour Abbey (not far from Mt Cordes) was constructed. The conflicts between the lords of Les Baux-de-Provence and the monks of Montmajour Abbey led to the construction of an observation and defensive tower (the 14th-century Tour des Abbés). The population gradually settled around the tower, encouraged at the same time by a water source protected by a small structure that they called the ‘old fountain’ (12th century). The farming community developed to provide food for the families of the stone-cutters, leading to two major but distinct guilds: quarrymen and farmers. Whilst the first oil mills appeared around the 16th century, it was not until the late 18th century that the earliest windmill, the moulin Sourdon, saw the light of day. The history of Fontvieille really took off after the French Revolution, when orders for stone began to increase. But the second half of the 19th century saw even greater growth: Fontvieille stone was transported across continents and oceans as it was suitable for a specific type of architecture – the Haussmannian style. The population of our village grew in response to these substantial requests from across the world, resulting in the emergence of three further windmills: Ramet, Tissot-Avon and Ribet. Sometimes history takes on the most poetic and artistic dimensions: the poet and writer Alphonse Daudet came to visit his cousin Louis Daudet at the Château de Montauban, the home of his parents-in-law. Daudet was so charmed by the village and the welcome he received that he came back regularly over the thirty years of his short life. Léo Lelée, famous for painting the women of Arles, later set up his easel in the small streets and hills of the village. Another painter of renown, Carl Liner, settled in the famous Tour des Abbés. The best way to discover the history of the village is on a guided tour run by the Tourist Office. The discovery of underground burial chambers indicates that humans were present during protohistory between 5000 and 2800 BC. The settlement of Fontvieille does not appear officially until the 18th century, two years after the start of the French Revolution. The use of stone was to become one of the main threads in our history. During the Roman period, the Celtic-Ligurian people of Arelate (modern-day Arles) supported Jules Caesar against Pompey. As a token of thanks, their city became a Roman colony, for which stone was needed. As our site was close-by and easily accessible, an open pit (or Roman) quarry was established 3 km from the centre of the current village. The first people to settle in the area were quarrymen, who remained there over time, only to move according to need around the village. This is how the town of Arelate was expanded, the Roman aqueduct and watermill at Barbegal were built and, in the Middle Ages, the Montmajour Abbey (not far from Mt Cordes) was constructed. The conflicts between the lords of Les Baux-de-Provence and the monks of Montmajour Abbey led to the construction of an observation and defensive tower (the 14th-century Tour des Abbés). The population gradually settled around the tower, encouraged at the same time by a water source protected by a small structure that they called the ‘old fountain’ (12th century). The farming community developed to provide food for the families of the stone-cutters, leading to two major but distinct guilds: quarrymen and farmers. Whilst the first oil mills appeared around the 16th century, it was not until the late 18th century that the earliest windmill, the moulin Sourdon, saw the light of day. The history of Fontvieille really took off after the French Revolution, when orders for stone began to increase. But the second half of the 19th century saw even greater growth: Fontvieille stone was transported across continents and oceans as it was suitable for a specific type of architecture – the Haussmannian style. The population of our village grew in response to these substantial requests from across the world, resulting in the emergence of three further windmills: Ramet, Tissot-Avon and Ribet. Sometimes history takes on the most poetic and artistic dimensions: the poet and writer Alphonse Daudet came to visit his cousin Louis Daudet at the Château de Montauban, the home of his parents-in-law. Daudet was so charmed by the village and the welcome he received that he came back regularly over the thirty years of his short life. Léo Lelée, famous for painting the women of Arles, later set up his easel in the small streets and hills of the village. Another painter of renown, Carl Liner, settled in the famous Tour des Abbés. The best way to discover the history of the village is on a guided tour run by the Tourist Office.


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