Alpilles

    Excavations of ancient Glanum

    €7,50

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    Address

    Town

    Saint-Rémy-de-Provence

    Website

    http://glanum.monuments-nationaux.fr/

    Map


    Description

    Known as ‘Les Antiques’, this is the most important site from Gallia Narbonensis. From the 16th century onwards, Les Antiques became an essential visit for scholars and travellers. This monumental ensemble, consisting of a triumphal arch and a mausoleum*, was the only visible reminder at the time of the town of Glanum. In the 17th and 18th centuries, increasing numbers of artefacts were discovered in the vicinity of Les Antiques. The first inhabitants settled here in the 6th and 7th centuries BC in the shelter of a dry-stone rampart that blocked the road to the Alpilles over a length of 300 m. Pottery and coins thrown as offerings into the swallow hole* above the spring indicate that the Gaulish settlement was motivated by religious reasons from its origin. A Celtic god, Glan, together with his benevolent companions known as the Glanic Mothers, lived in the waters that were thought to have healing properties, and which gave their name to the local inhabitants. Later relations with the Greek world brought wealth to the people of Glanum, resulting in the development of the inhabited area and the construction of Hellenistic-style* buildings in the 1st and 2nd centuries BC. Glanum subsequently became a Roman colony in the early years of Augustus’s reign (63 BC – 14 AD). This resulted in the rapid and profound transformation of the city’s monumental architecture. Finally, unable to resist the Alamannic invasions in 260 AD, the town was abandoned by its inhabitants in favour of the nearby settlement that came into the possession of the Abbey of St Remi in Reims in the Merovingian period. In 1921 systematic archaeological digs were carried out on the site on the initiative of Jules Formigé, the architect for historical monuments. Under his authority, Pierre de Brun oversaw the work for twenty years, unearthing the area around the basilica,* the houses in the northern quarter and the thermal baths. Henri Rolland succeeded de Brun from 1941 to 1969. The digs and research began again in 1983, yielding better knowledge about the ramparts and twin temples in particular. Study of the temples resulted in the restoration of a corner of the smaller of the two in 1992. Hellenistic* remains have also been discovered under the Roman forum. Restoration began in 2007, with the decision to adopt the layout of the late 1st century BC. Two ‘archaeological windows – openings in the ground – allow elements from earlier periods to be observed: the dromos well and the Hellenic* trapezoid square.Known as ‘Les Antiques’, this is the most important site from Gallia Narbonensis. From the 16th century onwards, Les Antiques became an essential visit for scholars and travellers. This monumental ensemble, consisting of a triumphal arch and a mausoleum*, was the only visible reminder at the time of the town of Glanum. In the 17th and 18th centuries, increasing numbers of artefacts were discovered in the vicinity of Les Antiques. The first inhabitants settled here in the 6th and 7th centuries BC in the shelter of a dry-stone rampart that blocked the road to the Alpilles over a length of 300 m. Pottery and coins thrown as offerings into the swallow hole* above the spring indicate that the Gaulish settlement was motivated by religious reasons from its origin. A Celtic god, Glan, together with his benevolent companions known as the Glanic Mothers, lived in the waters that were thought to have healing properties, and which gave their name to the local inhabitants. Later relations with the Greek world brought wealth to the people of Glanum, resulting in the development of the inhabited area and the construction of Hellenistic-style* buildings in the 1st and 2nd centuries BC. Glanum subsequently became a Roman colony in the early years of Augustus’s reign (63 BC – 14 AD). This resulted in the rapid and profound transformation of the city’s monumental architecture. Finally, unable to resist the Alamannic invasions in 260 AD, the town was abandoned by its inhabitants in favour of the nearby settlement that came into the possession of the Abbey of St Remi in Reims in the Merovingian period. In 1921 systematic archaeological digs were carried out on the site on the initiative of Jules Formigé, the architect for historical monuments. Under his authority, Pierre de Brun oversaw the work for twenty years, unearthing the area around the basilica,* the houses in the northern quarter and the thermal baths. Henri Rolland succeeded de Brun from 1941 to 1969. The digs and research began again in 1983, yielding better knowledge about the ramparts and twin temples in particular. Study of the temples resulted in the restoration of a corner of the smaller of the two in 1992. Hellenistic* remains have also been discovered under the Roman forum. Restoration began in 2007, with the decision to adopt the layout of the late 1st century BC. Two ‘archaeological windows – openings in the ground – allow elements from earlier periods to be observed: the dromos well and the Hellenic* trapezoid square.Known as ‘Les Antiques’, this is the most important site from Gallia Narbonensis. From the 16th century onwards, Les Antiques became an essential visit for scholars and travellers. This monumental ensemble, consisting of a triumphal arch and a mausoleum*, was the only visible reminder at the time of the town of Glanum. In the 17th and 18th centuries, increasing numbers of artefacts were discovered in the vicinity of Les Antiques. The first inhabitants settled here in the 6th and 7th centuries BC in the shelter of a dry-stone rampart that blocked the road to the Alpilles over a length of 300 m. Pottery and coins thrown as offerings into the swallow hole* above the spring indicate that the Gaulish settlement was motivated by religious reasons from its origin. A Celtic god, Glan, together with his benevolent companions known as the Glanic Mothers, lived in the waters that were thought to have healing properties, and which gave their name to the local inhabitants. Later relations with the Greek world brought wealth to the people of Glanum, resulting in the development of the inhabited area and the construction of Hellenistic-style* buildings in the 1st and 2nd centuries BC. Glanum subsequently became a Roman colony in the early years of Augustus’s reign (63 BC – 14 AD). This resulted in the rapid and profound transformation of the city’s monumental architecture. Finally, unable to resist the Alamannic invasions in 260 AD, the town was abandoned by its inhabitants in favour of the nearby settlement that came into the possession of the Abbey of St Remi in Reims in the Merovingian period. In 1921 systematic archaeological digs were carried out on the site on the initiative of Jules Formigé, the architect for historical monuments. Under his authority, Pierre de Brun oversaw the work for twenty years, unearthing the area around the basilica,* the houses in the northern quarter and the thermal baths. Henri Rolland succeeded de Brun from 1941 to 1969. The digs and research began again in 1983, yielding better knowledge about the ramparts and twin temples in particular. Study of the temples resulted in the restoration of a corner of the smaller of the two in 1992. Hellenistic* remains have also been discovered under the Roman forum. Restoration began in 2007, with the decision to adopt the layout of the late 1st century BC. Two ‘archaeological windows – openings in the ground – allow elements from earlier periods to be observed: the dromos well and the Hellenic* trapezoid square.Known as ‘Les Antiques’, this is the most important site from Gallia Narbonensis. From the 16th century onwards, Les Antiques became an essential visit for scholars and travellers. This monumental ensemble, consisting of a triumphal arch and a mausoleum*, was the only visible reminder at the time of the town of Glanum. In the 17th and 18th centuries, increasing numbers of artefacts were discovered in the vicinity of Les Antiques. The first inhabitants settled here in the 6th and 7th centuries BC in the shelter of a dry-stone rampart that blocked the road to the Alpilles over a length of 300 m. Pottery and coins thrown as offerings into the swallow hole* above the spring indicate that the Gaulish settlement was motivated by religious reasons from its origin. A Celtic god, Glan, together with his benevolent companions known as the Glanic Mothers, lived in the waters that were thought to have healing properties, and which gave their name to the local inhabitants. Later relations with the Greek world brought wealth to the people of Glanum, resulting in the development of the inhabited area and the construction of Hellenistic-style* buildings in the 1st and 2nd centuries BC. Glanum subsequently became a Roman colony in the early years of Augustus’s reign (63 BC – 14 AD). This resulted in the rapid and profound transformation of the city’s monumental architecture. Finally, unable to resist the Alamannic invasions in 260 AD, the town was abandoned by its inhabitants in favour of the nearby settlement that came into the possession of the Abbey of St Remi in Reims in the Merovingian period. In 1921 systematic archaeological digs were carried out on the site on the initiative of Jules Formigé, the architect for historical monuments. Under his authority, Pierre de Brun oversaw the work for twenty years, unearthing the area around the basilica,* the houses in the northern quarter and the thermal baths. Henri Rolland succeeded de Brun from 1941 to 1969. The digs and research began again in 1983, yielding better knowledge about the ramparts and twin temples in particular. Study of the temples resulted in the restoration of a corner of the smaller of the two in 1992. Hellenistic* remains have also been discovered under the Roman forum. Restoration began in 2007, with the decision to adopt the layout of the late 1st century BC. Two ‘archaeological windows – openings in the ground – allow elements from earlier periods to be observed: the dromos well and the Hellenic* trapezoid square.Known as ‘Les Antiques’, this is the most important site from Gallia Narbonensis. From the 16th century onwards, Les Antiques became an essential visit for scholars and travellers. This monumental ensemble, consisting of a triumphal arch and a mausoleum*, was the only visible reminder at the time of the town of Glanum. In the 17th and 18th centuries, increasing numbers of artefacts were discovered in the vicinity of Les Antiques. The first inhabitants settled here in the 6th and 7th centuries BC in the shelter of a dry-stone rampart that blocked the road to the Alpilles over a length of 300 m. Pottery and coins thrown as offerings into the swallow hole* above the spring indicate that the Gaulish settlement was motivated by religious reasons from its origin. A Celtic god, Glan, together with his benevolent companions known as the Glanic Mothers, lived in the waters that were thought to have healing properties, and which gave their name to the local inhabitants. Later relations with the Greek world brought wealth to the people of Glanum, resulting in the development of the inhabited area and the construction of Hellenistic-style* buildings in the 1st and 2nd centuries BC. Glanum subsequently became a Roman colony in the early years of Augustus’s reign (63 BC – 14 AD). This resulted in the rapid and profound transformation of the city’s monumental architecture. Finally, unable to resist the Alamannic invasions in 260 AD, the town was abandoned by its inhabitants in favour of the nearby settlement that came into the possession of the Abbey of St Remi in Reims in the Merovingian period. In 1921 systematic archaeological digs were carried out on the site on the initiative of Jules Formigé, the architect for historical monuments. Under his authority, Pierre de Brun oversaw the work for twenty years, unearthing the area around the basilica,* the houses in the northern quarter and the thermal baths. Henri Rolland succeeded de Brun from 1941 to 1969. The digs and research began again in 1983, yielding better knowledge about the ramparts and twin temples in particular. Study of the temples resulted in the restoration of a corner of the smaller of the two in 1992. Hellenistic* remains have also been discovered under the Roman forum. Restoration began in 2007, with the decision to adopt the layout of the late 1st century BC. Two ‘archaeological windows – openings in the ground – allow elements from earlier periods to be observed: the dromos well and the Hellenic* trapezoid square.Known as ‘Les Antiques’, this is the most important site from Gallia Narbonensis. From the 16th century onwards, Les Antiques became an essential visit for scholars and travellers. This monumental ensemble, consisting of a triumphal arch and a mausoleum*, was the only visible reminder at the time of the town of Glanum. In the 17th and 18th centuries, increasing numbers of artefacts were discovered in the vicinity of Les Antiques. The first inhabitants settled here in the 6th and 7th centuries BC in the shelter of a dry-stone rampart that blocked the road to the Alpilles over a length of 300 m. Pottery and coins thrown as offerings into the swallow hole* above the spring indicate that the Gaulish settlement was motivated by religious reasons from its origin. A Celtic god, Glan, together with his benevolent companions known as the Glanic Mothers, lived in the waters that were thought to have healing properties, and which gave their name to the local inhabitants. Later relations with the Greek world brought wealth to the people of Glanum, resulting in the development of the inhabited area and the construction of Hellenistic-style* buildings in the 1st and 2nd centuries BC. Glanum subsequently became a Roman colony in the early years of Augustus’s reign (63 BC – 14 AD). This resulted in the rapid and profound transformation of the city’s monumental architecture. Finally, unable to resist the Alamannic invasions in 260 AD, the town was abandoned by its inhabitants in favour of the nearby settlement that came into the possession of the Abbey of St Remi in Reims in the Merovingian period. In 1921 systematic archaeological digs were carried out on the site on the initiative of Jules Formigé, the architect for historical monuments. Under his authority, Pierre de Brun oversaw the work for twenty years, unearthing the area around the basilica,* the houses in the northern quarter and the thermal baths. Henri Rolland succeeded de Brun from 1941 to 1969. The digs and research began again in 1983, yielding better knowledge about the ramparts and twin temples in particular. Study of the temples resulted in the restoration of a corner of the smaller of the two in 1992. Hellenistic* remains have also been discovered under the Roman forum. Restoration began in 2007, with the decision to adopt the layout of the late 1st century BC. Two ‘archaeological windows – openings in the ground – allow elements from earlier periods to be observed: the dromos well and the Hellenic* trapezoid square.Known as ‘Les Antiques’, this is the most important site from Gallia Narbonensis. From the 16th century onwards, Les Antiques became an essential visit for scholars and travellers. This monumental ensemble, consisting of a triumphal arch and a mausoleum*, was the only visible reminder at the time of the town of Glanum. In the 17th and 18th centuries, increasing numbers of artefacts were discovered in the vicinity of Les Antiques. The first inhabitants settled here in the 6th and 7th centuries BC in the shelter of a dry-stone rampart that blocked the road to the Alpilles over a length of 300 m. Pottery and coins thrown as offerings into the swallow hole* above the spring indicate that the Gaulish settlement was motivated by religious reasons from its origin. A Celtic god, Glan, together with his benevolent companions known as the Glanic Mothers, lived in the waters that were thought to have healing properties, and which gave their name to the local inhabitants. Later relations with the Greek world brought wealth to the people of Glanum, resulting in the development of the inhabited area and the construction of Hellenistic-style* buildings in the 1st and 2nd centuries BC. Glanum subsequently became a Roman colony in the early years of Augustus’s reign (63 BC – 14 AD). This resulted in the rapid and profound transformation of the city’s monumental architecture. Finally, unable to resist the Alamannic invasions in 260 AD, the town was abandoned by its inhabitants in favour of the nearby settlement that came into the possession of the Abbey of St Remi in Reims in the Merovingian period. In 1921 systematic archaeological digs were carried out on the site on the initiative of Jules Formigé, the architect for historical monuments. Under his authority, Pierre de Brun oversaw the work for twenty years, unearthing the area around the basilica,* the houses in the northern quarter and the thermal baths. Henri Rolland succeeded de Brun from 1941 to 1969. The digs and research began again in 1983, yielding better knowledge about the ramparts and twin temples in particular. Study of the temples resulted in the restoration of a corner of the smaller of the two in 1992. Hellenistic* remains have also been discovered under the Roman forum. Restoration began in 2007, with the decision to adopt the layout of the late 1st century BC. Two ‘archaeological windows – openings in the ground – allow elements from earlier periods to be observed: the dromos well and the Hellenic* trapezoid square.Known as ‘Les Antiques’, this is the most important site from Gallia Narbonensis. From the 16th century onwards, Les Antiques became an essential visit for scholars and travellers. This monumental ensemble, consisting of a triumphal arch and a mausoleum*, was the only visible reminder at the time of the town of Glanum. In the 17th and 18th centuries, increasing numbers of artefacts were discovered in the vicinity of Les Antiques. The first inhabitants settled here in the 6th and 7th centuries BC in the shelter of a dry-stone rampart that blocked the road to the Alpilles over a length of 300 m. Pottery and coins thrown as offerings into the swallow hole* above the spring indicate that the Gaulish settlement was motivated by religious reasons from its origin. A Celtic god, Glan, together with his benevolent companions known as the Glanic Mothers, lived in the waters that were thought to have healing properties, and which gave their name to the local inhabitants. Later relations with the Greek world brought wealth to the people of Glanum, resulting in the development of the inhabited area and the construction of Hellenistic-style* buildings in the 1st and 2nd centuries BC. Glanum subsequently became a Roman colony in the early years of Augustus’s reign (63 BC – 14 AD). This resulted in the rapid and profound transformation of the city’s monumental architecture. Finally, unable to resist the Alamannic invasions in 260 AD, the town was abandoned by its inhabitants in favour of the nearby settlement that came into the possession of the Abbey of St Remi in Reims in the Merovingian period. In 1921 systematic archaeological digs were carried out on the site on the initiative of Jules Formigé, the architect for historical monuments. Under his authority, Pierre de Brun oversaw the work for twenty years, unearthing the area around the basilica,* the houses in the northern quarter and the thermal baths. Henri Rolland succeeded de Brun from 1941 to 1969. The digs and research began again in 1983, yielding better knowledge about the ramparts and twin temples in particular. Study of the temples resulted in the restoration of a corner of the smaller of the two in 1992. Hellenistic* remains have also been discovered under the Roman forum. Restoration began in 2007, with the decision to adopt the layout of the late 1st century BC. Two ‘archaeological windows – openings in the ground – allow elements from earlier periods to be observed: the dromos well and the Hellenic* trapezoid square.


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    7,50

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    Full price : 7,5 € / Reduced price: 6 €

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