Chateauneuf-du-Pape

    Chateau-neuf du Pape village

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    Shortly after having established the Popes’ residency in Avignon, where he had previously been Bishop, John XXII started to dlop the Chateauneuf-du-Pape vineyard, formerly known as Calcernier. Calcernier, dominated by the Pope Castle, became Chateauneuf-Calcernier. In 1317, John XXII had the first vines planted by winemakers from Cahors, his home town. What will later be known as Châteauneuf-du-Pape became the first Pontifical vineyard. The winemakers from Cahors planted the first plots on ground abandoned by the Templars, chased by King Philippe le Bel. By 1325, the Pontifical vineyard covered 8 hectares. Pope Urbain V further dloped the production area by planting Muscat grapes. From 1833 onwards, Chateauneuf become Pope Clement VII’s favourite residence. He would come riding on a mule, hence the famous legend ‘The Pope’s mule’ written by Alphonse Daudet. Later, in the 18th Century, the vineyard was dloped by the local aristocracy and the commercial bourgeoisie. At the end of the 19th Century, under the leadership of Joseph Ducos, mayor of Chateauneuf-Calcernier, the town was renamed Chateauneuf-du-Pape. In 1893, after the vines had been devastated by phylloxera, the same Joseph Ducos, owner of the Nerthe Castle, undertook the vineyard’s reconstruction. He planted sral grape varieties, among which the 3 major ones, grenache, mourvedre and syrah would bring strength, mellow, and rich colour, essential characteristics of great wines. The other varieties then bring unusual notes and new combinations become possible. The blending of grape varieties is a subtle task, giving birth to complex and beautifully balanced red or white wines. One of the key characteristics of the Chateauneuf-du-Pape terroir is the mineral signature of land previously covered by the Mediterranean sea and then the Rhone river. The ground is still covered with stones and pebbles, restoring at night the heat accumulated during the day. The hot and dry Mediterranean climate as well as the Mistral play an essential role in the good health of the vineyard. Vine culativation and wine making play a very important part, whether direcly or indirectly, in the local economy. Today, the population is over 2000 inhabitants. Shortly after having established the Popes’ residency in Avignon, where he had previously been Bishop, John XXII started to dlop the Chateauneuf-du-Pape vineyard, formerly known as Calcernier. Calcernier, dominated by the Pope Castle, became Chateauneuf-Calcernier. In 1317, John XXII had the first vines planted by winemakers from Cahors, his home town. What will later be known as Châteauneuf-du-Pape became the first Pontifical vineyard. The winemakers from Cahors planted the first plots on ground abandoned by the Templars, chased by King Philippe le Bel. By 1325, the Pontifical vineyard covered 8 hectares. Pope Urbain V further dloped the production area by planting Muscat grapes. From 1833 onwards, Chateauneuf become Pope Clement VII’s favourite residence. He would come riding on a mule, hence the famous legend ‘The Pope’s mule’ written by Alphonse Daudet. Later, in the 18th Century, the vineyard was dloped by the local aristocracy and the commercial bourgeoisie. At the end of the 19th Century, under the leadership of Joseph Ducos, mayor of Chateauneuf-Calcernier, the town was renamed Chateauneuf-du-Pape. In 1893, after the vines had been devastated by phylloxera, the same Joseph Ducos, owner of the Nerthe Castle, undertook the vineyard’s reconstruction. He planted sral grape varieties, among which the 3 major ones, grenache, mourvedre and syrah would bring strength, mellow, and rich colour, essential characteristics of great wines. The other varieties then bring unusual notes and new combinations become possible. The blending of grape varieties is a subtle task, giving birth to complex and beautifully balanced red or white wines. One of the key characteristics of the Chateauneuf-du-Pape terroir is the mineral signature of land previously covered by the Mediterranean sea and then the Rhone river. The ground is still covered with stones and pebbles, restoring at night the heat accumulated during the day. The hot and dry Mediterranean climate as well as the Mistral play an essential role in the good health of the vineyard. Vine culativation and wine making play a very important part, whether direcly or indirectly, in the local economy. Today, the population is over 2000 inhabitants. Shortly after having established the Popes’ residency in Avignon, where he had previously been Bishop, John XXII started to dlop the Chateauneuf-du-Pape vineyard, formerly known as Calcernier. Calcernier, dominated by the Pope Castle, became Chateauneuf-Calcernier. In 1317, John XXII had the first vines planted by winemakers from Cahors, his home town. What will later be known as Châteauneuf-du-Pape became the first Pontifical vineyard. The winemakers from Cahors planted the first plots on ground abandoned by the Templars, chased by King Philippe le Bel. By 1325, the Pontifical vineyard covered 8 hectares. Pope Urbain V further dloped the production area by planting Muscat grapes. From 1833 onwards, Chateauneuf become Pope Clement VII’s favourite residence. He would come riding on a mule, hence the famous legend ‘The Pope’s mule’ written by Alphonse Daudet. Later, in the 18th Century, the vineyard was dloped by the local aristocracy and the commercial bourgeoisie. At the end of the 19th Century, under the leadership of Joseph Ducos, mayor of Chateauneuf-Calcernier, the town was renamed Chateauneuf-du-Pape. In 1893, after the vines had been devastated by phylloxera, the same Joseph Ducos, owner of the Nerthe Castle, undertook the vineyard’s reconstruction. He planted sral grape varieties, among which the 3 major ones, grenache, mourvedre and syrah would bring strength, mellow, and rich colour, essential characteristics of great wines. The other varieties then bring unusual notes and new combinations become possible. The blending of grape varieties is a subtle task, giving birth to complex and beautifully balanced red or white wines. One of the key characteristics of the Chateauneuf-du-Pape terroir is the mineral signature of land previously covered by the Mediterranean sea and then the Rhone river. The ground is still covered with stones and pebbles, restoring at night the heat accumulated during the day. The hot and dry Mediterranean climate as well as the Mistral play an essential role in the good health of the vineyard. Vine culativation and wine making play a very important part, whether direcly or indirectly, in the local economy. Today, the population is over 2000 inhabitants. Shortly after having established the Popes’ residency in Avignon, where he had previously been Bishop, John XXII started to dlop the Chateauneuf-du-Pape vineyard, formerly known as Calcernier. Calcernier, dominated by the Pope Castle, became Chateauneuf-Calcernier. In 1317, John XXII had the first vines planted by winemakers from Cahors, his home town. What will later be known as Châteauneuf-du-Pape became the first Pontifical vineyard. The winemakers from Cahors planted the first plots on ground abandoned by the Templars, chased by King Philippe le Bel. By 1325, the Pontifical vineyard covered 8 hectares. Pope Urbain V further dloped the production area by planting Muscat grapes. From 1833 onwards, Chateauneuf become Pope Clement VII’s favourite residence. He would come riding on a mule, hence the famous legend ‘The Pope’s mule’ written by Alphonse Daudet. Later, in the 18th Century, the vineyard was dloped by the local aristocracy and the commercial bourgeoisie. At the end of the 19th Century, under the leadership of Joseph Ducos, mayor of Chateauneuf-Calcernier, the town was renamed Chateauneuf-du-Pape. In 1893, after the vines had been devastated by phylloxera, the same Joseph Ducos, owner of the Nerthe Castle, undertook the vineyard’s reconstruction. He planted sral grape varieties, among which the 3 major ones, grenache, mourvedre and syrah would bring strength, mellow, and rich colour, essential characteristics of great wines. The other varieties then bring unusual notes and new combinations become possible. The blending of grape varieties is a subtle task, giving birth to complex and beautifully balanced red or white wines. One of the key characteristics of the Chateauneuf-du-Pape terroir is the mineral signature of land previously covered by the Mediterranean sea and then the Rhone river. The ground is still covered with stones and pebbles, restoring at night the heat accumulated during the day. The hot and dry Mediterranean climate as well as the Mistral play an essential role in the good health of the vineyard. Vine culativation and wine making play a very important part, whether direcly or indirectly, in the local economy. Today, the population is over 2000 inhabitants. Shortly after having established the Popes’ residency in Avignon, where he had previously been Bishop, John XXII started to dlop the Chateauneuf-du-Pape vineyard, formerly known as Calcernier. Calcernier, dominated by the Pope Castle, became Chateauneuf-Calcernier. In 1317, John XXII had the first vines planted by winemakers from Cahors, his home town. What will later be known as Châteauneuf-du-Pape became the first Pontifical vineyard. The winemakers from Cahors planted the first plots on ground abandoned by the Templars, chased by King Philippe le Bel. By 1325, the Pontifical vineyard covered 8 hectares. Pope Urbain V further dloped the production area by planting Muscat grapes. From 1833 onwards, Chateauneuf become Pope Clement VII’s favourite residence. He would come riding on a mule, hence the famous legend ‘The Pope’s mule’ written by Alphonse Daudet. Later, in the 18th Century, the vineyard was dloped by the local aristocracy and the commercial bourgeoisie. At the end of the 19th Century, under the leadership of Joseph Ducos, mayor of Chateauneuf-Calcernier, the town was renamed Chateauneuf-du-Pape. In 1893, after the vines had been devastated by phylloxera, the same Joseph Ducos, owner of the Nerthe Castle, undertook the vineyard’s reconstruction. He planted sral grape varieties, among which the 3 major ones, grenache, mourvedre and syrah would bring strength, mellow, and rich colour, essential characteristics of great wines. The other varieties then bring unusual notes and new combinations become possible. The blending of grape varieties is a subtle task, giving birth to complex and beautifully balanced red or white wines. One of the key characteristics of the Chateauneuf-du-Pape terroir is the mineral signature of land previously covered by the Mediterranean sea and then the Rhone river. The ground is still covered with stones and pebbles, restoring at night the heat accumulated during the day. The hot and dry Mediterranean climate as well as the Mistral play an essential role in the good health of the vineyard. Vine culativation and wine making play a very important part, whether direcly or indirectly, in the local economy. Today, the population is over 2000 inhabitants.


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